Brad nailer - 18 ga. big enough?

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They only sting a little.........or so I'm told.
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wrote:

You can test that theory and get back.
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Staples are good for lots of things. I used a 1/4" crown staples on the backs of book cases. The 1/4" wood back into a 3/8" cutout.
Staples (Quality Stainless steel please!!) are used in roofing. (non SS last a few years before letting go.)
I have a box nail gun - board - does up to 3 1/2" (IIRC) headed nail. They are the coil nailers and are often used in roofing. (sheet works).
Martin
Martin H. Eastburn @ home at Lions' Lair with our computer lionslair at consolidated dot net "Our Republic and the Press will Rise or Fall Together": Joseph Pulitzer TSRA: Endowed; NRA LOH & Patron Member, Golden Eagle, Patriot's Medal. NRA Second Amendment Task Force Originator & Charter Founder IHMSA and NRA Metallic Silhouette maker & member. http://lufkinced.com /
On 8/8/2010 4:44 PM, Pistol_Pete wrote:

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I have a box nail gun - board - does up to 3 1/2" (IIRC) headed nail. They are the coil nailers and are often used in roofing. (sheet works).
tWith the guns I have, the coil guns used for roofing generally use larger headed nails, and therefore a wider spacing in the coil. I have coil framing nailers, and coil roofing nailers, and a wide crown roofing stapler.
The last one has been sitting since I got the coil roofing nailer. I wouldn't use a roofing staple on a doghouse. They set to an inaccurate depth, far too often, or back out. That is my experience with them, at least. That was with a roof sheathing consisting of random width SPF 1 by material. They are better in OSB or plywood, but when they hit a rafter or truss, they will often not set as deep as is necessary, causing the roofing applier to crawl back on a roof to renail several shingles-for years to come. DAMHIKT! :-(
--
Jim in NC



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Morgans wrote:

I recently had my roof professionally replaced. They used the staplers with 3.5" staples to attach plywood sheeting only. A coiled roofing nailer was used for the shingles.
--
Jack Novak
Buffalo, NY - USA
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On 8/10/2010 8:12 AM, Nova wrote:

The packaging on the 50 year GAF shingles I put on my garage a couple of years back stated explicitly that the warranty was void if they were attached with staples.
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Mine did too. Forget the brand but not GAF. Staples rip the shingles through too easily.
Even power nailers area problem with the two layer shingles. The impact past the edge of the second layer tend to rip through the upper layer where the hollow spot is. Warranty void again.
The packaging on the 50 year GAF shingles I put on my garage a couple of years back stated explicitly that the warranty was void if they were attached with staples.
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I found the18 GA nail gun to be a bit light and went with the 15 GA for case work. But the 18 GA would work for tri - but those who do a lot of fine trim work would likely recommend the lighter GA pin nailer. No heads as I understand it so less putty/filler and sanding . . . If you can only afford the one, a good 18GA 'l do ya
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OH, make SURE your guns have a DEPTH ADJUSTMENT!

Not for insulation - well, if the depth adjustment allows you to set on and not drive through the paper backing I suppose it would work. I use a hammer stapler T50's 3/16 deep for installing insulation in walls.
They work where nails work. I've used them everywhere I can imagine. I've ONLY used quarter-inch crown staples in a pneumatic gun. And, I suspect, that is the kind used by guns that shoot either brads or staples.
One caution, they can "blow a leg out" and surprise you - and, then, getting them out is tough.
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Pistol_Pete wrote:

I recently bought the 18g pin nailer/stapler from HF
http://tinyurl.com/29bok9f
I rarely had a need for an air nailer in my shop, or a stapler, but have always wanted one for just what you are wanting to do. I read in here all about the HF stuff, some good, some bad. My brother bought the above nailer for some bee hives he was making, and a friend of his recommended the HF. I told him I had read (here) they were ok, but don't get the combo. He said he had no problems with it... so, I bought one.
When I got it home, I tested it out, first shooting some 1 3/16 pin nails... Worked fine. Then, put in stables and it jammed... I though damn, this sucks, but when I cleared the jam, it was a pin and a staple that jammed, and apparently, when I removed the nails, I left one in the firing mechanism, and the staple and pin both fired at once, jamming the gun. Since then, I've only used it a few times, about 500 pins and no jamming.

18g is skinny and won't split much of anything. I first built a bird house and bird feeder ( only thing I could think of other than trim I'd use a nailer for) and I shot pins into the edges of 3/8" lumber and no splits. More of a problem is pins shooting out the sides if it hits something like a knot, or your aim is not straight.
The pins hold fairly well, the bird stuff I used no glue, and they feel solid. Other than that, the pins are way too weak for anything structural. They would be good for nailing backs on cabinets.
As far as pinning until the glue dries... nah, I like clamps. Nails require putty, something I avoid as much as possible. A more appropriate use would be nailing a template, say for a shaper or bandsaw pattern.
If I don't buy any air nailer,

I never glue on a back, always just use nails. Perfect use for a pin nailer.
but a pneumatic nailer would make the job a whole lot easier.
Yes, unless you manage to shoot a nail out the side, or get a jam...

I bought 1 3/16th pins, figuring I could pin 2 3/4" boards together.

Staples are used for lots of stuff. I bought 1/2" and will probably need longer ones. Haven't used the stapler yet, other than to test it out.
I would definitely buy the HF stapler/nailer combo above for intermittent use in a home shop. If you do it for a living, say a trim carpenter, you would not be asking:-)
I liked it so much, I built a $50 case to store it in.
--
Jack
Those who trade liberty for security have neither.
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