Boeshield T9 Problem

Page 2 of 2  


Are you mixing your own shellac and brushing it on, or are you using a spray like Bull's Eye?
-Peter
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 04 Mar 2004 08:43:28 -0600, Peter De Smidt

I had some dewaxed pale mixed up already and wiped it on with a rag.
The surface is at least as slick as proprietary coatings and it's less time consuming to reapply than wax, as it does not have to be buffed.
So far I'm happy enough with it to plan on stripping the coatings off the other machines and using the shellac on them - when the weather gets a little warmer.
Thomas J. Watson - Cabinetmaker (ret.) (Real Email is tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet) http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1 /
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom Watson wrote:

Why do you say wax has to be buffed? I never buff after applying wax to tool surfaces.
-- Jack Novak Buffalo, NY - USA (Remove "SPAM" from email address to reply)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I buffed out the surface with a lamb's wool bonnet so that I was pretty much guaranteed that wax would not transfer to the wood, particularly sheet goods.
Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker (ret) Real Email is: tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet Website: http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
buff the wax to make it nice and slick and to remove the excess before your wood does.
dave
Nova wrote:

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
brought forth from the murky depths:

Don't you even wipe the dusty residue off, Yack? (which reminds me to wipe off that thickest scraper blade I found slightly rusted in a box last week...)
------------------------------- Iguana: The other green meat! ------------------------------- http://diversify.com Comprehensive Website Development
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Nova wrote:

In reading about T-9, Peter Schwarz, President of PMS Products - the company that manufactures BoeShield T9 explained that Boeshield is mainly a paraffin wax in a solvent vehicle. "Once the solvent evaporates, the remaining film is a dry paraffin wax which will not stain wood." <- a quote. Application calls for spraying then wiping off but he went on to indicate that for long-term storage, spray on but do not wipe off. And T9 is also billed as a waterproof lubricant. BTW, I use it on my bicycle chain and it performs magnificently.
Philski
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

It doesn't have to stain the wood in order to create problems in finishing. If the wax gets into the pores it will create a spot that is lighter than those areas that have no wax on them, once you get to the staining and finishing.
It's not as bad as smeared in glue but it can be a problem.
Thomas J. Watson-Cabinetmaker (ret) Real Email is: tjwatson1ATcomcastDOTnet Website: http://home.comcast.net/~tjwatson1
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Next go round, I'm going to try it as well.
Barry
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I've followed your lead and will chime in with an amen (if it works as advertised) as soon as the snow starts melting and the humidity in the shop climbs above 30%.
Ken Muldrew snipped-for-privacy@ucalgazry.ca (remove all letters after y in the alphabet)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.