Blade Guard on a Table Saw?

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HotRod wrote:

Uh, by 'freehand' do you mean without using either fence or miter?
If so, I daresay that is a feature, not a defect.
--

FF


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No I do not, but should I decide that I should, I'll buy a SawStop instead.
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A guard is lot cheaper... <g>
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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LOL, yes, much cheaper. But I like to see what's going on and I cut dado's on the TS and that was the only time so far that I have been injured using the TS.
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Yes, Uniguard. Also has a very good splitter
Frank
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"Frank Boettcher" wrote in message

Ditto ...
--
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Last update: 10/22/06
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Biesemeyer overhead guard. It can not be used on every single cut but it is there for every one that will work.
Samson wrote:

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Samson wrote:

I don't. The saw I have didn't come with one. I got it used and the guard wasn't included.
I am however building an overhead guard for it. The guard I'm building is made of 3/8 lexan on an overhead mount, It'll be wide enough that I can also do dado's on it. For the plans just do a search on lexan blade gaurd in the rec. There are several sites with the instructions.
I had a close call and was lucky that's all it was... Was doing a series of cuts on several pieces, got too cozy with it and didn't shut off between cuts, in the process of moving back across the blade the wood brushed the blade.... ZING!!!! I did a quick inventory, got to ten and decided a guard might be a good idea.
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Samson wrote:

A shop-made overhead guard, made of Lexan. I built mine following a woodcentral.com article, complete with a dust fitting.
My splitter is also shop made, consisting of a shop-made zero clearance insert with a glued in a white oak splitter. I have different versions for different blades.
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Does your's resemble the pictures on WoodCentral? I ask because their's looks loike it is connected to the ceiling.
Mike
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Mike wrote:

Yes and yes!
The main differences are: the top plate of mine is maple (I ran out of lexan <G>), I used 6-32 cap screws (I had them) and I used a 3" threaded PVC connector as the dust port, which takes a 4" hose nicely.
I'm extremely happy with that guard and glad I built it. I like the idea of screwing parts together without glue, in case a replacement is needed. The saw is cleaner, too!
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Hi,
    I try to use the guard/splitter/antikick back thing when I can. There are times such as when cutting dadoes when it does not work. I have practiced installing and removing the guard so that the process is relatively quick. Also I try to plan my cuts to minimize switching cut types. I do not have a guard on my cutoff sled, mostly, because I have not figured out a good design, that would not get it the way of my product runs of 100 identical pieces.
    With that said, my biggest safety feature has been the constant training of myself to put my full attention on the saw if the blade is spinning. If there is a distraction or I feel even a bit dazed or tired, the saw gets turned off immediately. No "One more cut."
Thanks Roger Haar
******************************************************************************* Samson wrote:

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I use a bladeguard any time it doesn't impede an operation and I require 350+ college student shop users to do the same. Back when I didn't have to set an example, I hated bladeguards as much as the next guy, but after a few years of using 'em, I get uncomfortable when it should be there but isn't.
Of course most stock guards are worthless and are thrown out for a reason. Aftermarket overheads are pretty good or you can build your own or just get a new saw (a good excuse for a new tool!!). The new PM has a riving knife as does the sawstop. I think I recently heard that riving knifes will be required on new saws in 09? (I'll check this out at work tomorrrow) So if your looking for new equipment, you might put it off to see what happens with this.
We use Beismeyer overheads. The cheezy adjustment bolts are removed, so it's an easy slide of the telescoping tubes to tweak the location of the guard or to push it out of the way for narrow rips.
We have SawStops, so the riving knives are ALWAYS(nearly) there, invisibly making stock go straight and preventing binding. I actually worry that our students will get into trouble if they use saws without riving knifes in some other setting: the riving knives almost make things too easy.
BTW: we have not changed any sop's with the advent of sawstops, they're just another layer of protection.
I agree that watching the blade is not necessarily sound practice. You really cannot discern what your stock is doing if your fixating on the blade spinning 'round. If you're ripping, it's much more important to keep an eye on the edge of your stock against the rip fence so that you know that it's going straight and can adjust accordingly if it isn't. The blade is going to spin and cut, you should be concentrating on making the stock go straight.
I've got 2 unbending, shorter-than-the-other fingers due to an unguarded tablesaw that I got into when I was in college. I've been preventing it from happening to other students for 12 years now. Blade guards (and sawstops) are a no-brainer.
If you don't use a guard you're just asking for trouble.
I don't care how experienced, careful, knowledgable or invincible you are, WHY would you leave that spinning blade out in the open when you can put something over it.
Kevin Groenke University of Minnesota College of Design - FabLab
Roger Haar wrote:

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"MNFabLab" wrote in message

Bingo! ... As you get older you realize that gaining good habits is as easy as gaining bad ones and the sense to find a good blade guard and use it, and the discipline to make the use a habit, ends up just like you describe.
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That's the whole discussion in a nutshell.
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Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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I use the guard & splitter whenever the cut permits it (which is about 99% of the time)
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I...ummm...don't. But after reading Nigel's post I'm going to.
Mike
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On 10/23/2006 3:45:12 PM, wrote:

Thanks for all the replies. I haven't used a guard for years, but after reading the posts, I'm going to start using one.
Samson
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Samson wrote:

When I had my Craftsman I always used the guard for through cutting and would have preferred to have a suspended guard for dado/grooving, etc. Shortly after upgrading to a Unisaw I added a Uniguard and I use it for all types of cutting. I really enjoy the "security" a blade guard offers - even for non through cuts - but I don't let my own guard down and become careless. As a side note, several weeks ago I posted a message about a potential accident that occurred when my basket guard caused the table insert to lift due to some adhesive that got stuck from a previous cut. I was able to shut off the saw before the blade made contact with the insert. This just adds to the fact that you need to be careful and mindful of everything when using a table saw, irrespective of the safety devices and guards that it is fitted with. Marc
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I've never used a guard, but I bought a new saw recently and thought I'd at least try using the guard. Well, after two cuts or so, the guard was removed, and there it sits. As in the past, I felt more comfortable without it. That said, I really want to find a blade guard that works. It seems there are so many different styles of guard out there, that one shouldn't have any excuse why they're not using something! Anyway, I recently acquired an Excalibur overhead guard and just got it installed yesterday. I haven't tried it out in use yet, but I do like that the guard can be moved out of the way and returned easily without removing it from the saw. This is a step in the right direction for me - being able to keep the guard attached to the saw means I'm more likely to use it! --dave

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