Antiquing Pine


Hi All,
Can someone tell me the procedure to finish bare pine (radiata) with an antique look. I would like to end up with a clear finish with the grain visible but with the furniture looking like it might have been made 50 years ago.
From the look of the furniture in the local pine shop this process applying a wax - at least it has that feel to it.
Thanks,
Steve
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I usually do the preliminary sanding, and then before applying finish, I apply dings, dents, gouges, bangs, etc. A ball peen hammer is useful because of the different types of edges. I press the shaft against the wood edges and run it around.
Then I apply a dark stain - sometimes ebony. The dark stain soaks into the dents and cuts.
Then I sand off the top layer, so only the distressed pieces of wood are dark.
I then apply the normal color stain, and finish as usual.

A dark wax can be used as well, afterwards. This fills in the gaps etc, and looks like years of crude and build-up.
I sometimes use the Beall buff system. This gives the piece a warm well-polished look - like it's seen a lot of use.
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Check out Jeff Jewett's video (or book). I remember he uses muriatic acid on pine to age it.
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www.refinishwizard.com has discussed this in the past if memory serves. If not ask.
On Sat, 20 Aug 2005 20:50:14 +1000, "......... :-\)\)"

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On Sat, 20 Aug 2005 20:50:14 +1000, "......... :-\)\)"

I paint it with a simple strong solution of washing soda, then leave it overnight. This gives some age darkening, but is a pretty benign process. Almost any chemical oxidiser will do, but most are overkill.
Then I'd apply a finish. I wouldn't use bare wax on pine, because it's not a high enough quality timber to demand it as a "precious" piece and it's not a strong enough finish for the everyday use that pine will probably see. I'd probably oil it first, then apply a clear wax. If it's wanting a hard-wearing surface, then maybe two (no more) coats of a gel poly.
Local practice in the "instant antique" trade is a tinted wax, usually Briwax. I don't like this, as it gives a darker surface over a lighter timber. Any small scrapes are very visible.
I find a plastic rotary wire brush a good tool for applying and power-buffing wax. Although these will clean and polish copper, they do very little to the surface of timber, bar a gently softening of edges.
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