7" Tee Hinge Painted/Rusted

I have some 80 year old garage door hinges that don't look easy to replace. I believe they are called tee hinges and have a 7" length pad. I'd like to try rejuvinating them as using the original hardware would be a huge bonus to my project. Beyond that, if there are any suggestions on where I might find such a non-standard hinge, I'm open to suggestions.
I've removed them from the garage/door and used some JASCO paint remover I had laying around. While the hinge used to be completely frozen, taking the paint off helped a lot and uncovered some nice rust. I'd like to clean the rust out, but common sense tells me I'd have to take it apart to do it right (it's still amost frozen solid)..
How would I know if the hinge has a non-removable pin? It does appear to have a small sliver of space on one pin that looks made for prying where the other end is flush. Never having taken a hinge apart (much less put one back together), any suggestions on how to take it apart, clean the rust and get it back together without destroying it?
Thanks!
Jeff
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I doubt you will have to take it apart. One thing you can try is to soak it in a bath of water and hydrocloric acid, but be carefull! Hydrocloric acid is very nasty stuff, just the fumes alone will cause burns, especially to your nose! Another method is electrolosis. It is a method of using a very mild acid solution, and a battery charger to electrically remove the rust. More info on this method can be had over at rec.crafts.metalworking. Greg
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vaguely proposed a theory ......and in reply I say!:
remove ns from my header address to reply via email
From what I know electrolysis uses alkaline (caustic soda or washing soda), not acid solution. Acid would etch the good metal. Alkali does not.
http://myweb.tiscali.co.uk/andyspatch/rust.htm http://www.rowand.net/Shop/Tech/Electrolysis.htm

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Jeff, It's just a hinge. Toss into a bucket of motor oil for a few days. Remove, clean with solvent, wire brush or if you have access to a glass bead blaster. (Many auto repair shops have them.)
Remove the hinge pin, clean again, grease the pin, re-assemble, prime with red oxide, paint to suit then re-install.
Dave

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Jeff,
Here is my suggestion. Take the hinge to a local blacksmith, he/she will be able to free it in a matter of a few minutes. You do not have to take it apart. You only need to heat the hinge to a red heat and work it back and forth. this will burn off any paint or crud that has gotten into the hinge joint and will burnish the pin with the barrels. While working it back and forth, cool the hinge in a bucket of water. Allow to dry and you have fixed it as well as cleaned off any excess gunk. repaint to suit and you are done.
I helped another blacksmith free a rust-frozen pair of tongs in this manner and it is fast and easy. No disassembly required.
Hope this helps, Paul
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