10" TS blades

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I'm just a hobbyist, make little organizers, odds and ends. Very much budget constrained.
For 10+ years I've been running with:
Freud 10" Carbide Finishing 40 Tooth Advanced Anti-Kickback Design and haven't done too badly.
Rockler currently has: Freud 2-pack of 10" Rip and Fine Crosscut ... $40 #47943
How much of an improvement (if any) might the new blades make? Speculation is encouraged.
Thx, Will
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If you haven't had your blade sharpened, it'll make a huge difference. If you've had it sharpened every now and again, maybe not so much.
Puckdropper
--
Make it to fit, don't make it fit.

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On 10/10/2012 6:54 PM, Wilfred Xavier Pickles wrote:

If you keep this up one day you will buy a Forrest. With it be sooner or later?
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Wilfred Xavier Pickles wrote:

If funds are tight, consider getting existing blade sharpened.
$20 a blade doesn't get you much of a blade, IMHO.
Lew
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On 10/11/12 12:00 AM, Lew Hodgett wrote:

They are marked down quite a bit... a whole lot of a bit. :-) I couldn't see the model numbers in that Rockler ad, nor if they were thin kerf/thin plate blade. But the rip blade looks like it might be their glue line rip blade without the fancy paint job. Same with the cross cut blade. Both of those would be very good blade, if the same as their high end.
When I called Freud a while back when researching blades, one of their tech guys told me that they often have these large runs of "plain" blades to sell in bulk for many different reasons. Some are for industrial use, some are for huge retailers so they can have a unique sku number, and other reasons.
He said some are thinner kerf versions, some are smaller tooth versions (less sharpening), but many are the exact same blade as their marquee lines except with different printing and no "slippery red"paint job.
If the ones in this pack are the latter, it is an exceptional deal. If they are thinner kerf, even "Diablo" blades, they are still pretty good for the price. The plate thickness is the real issue on those blade, because the teeth with be great. But if they have a thin plate, they will wobble too much and have a less that perfect cut.
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Do you know about what plate thickness the "good" blades are? I can pack a caliper, maybe make an actual measurement at Rockler.
Thx, Will
"Law Without Equity Is No Law At All. It Is A Form Of Jungle Rule."
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On 10/11/12 12:49 PM, Puddin' Man wrote:

You won't need a caliper. :-) Just go look at the expensive full kerf blades and take note of how thick their plates are. There are about 3 thicknesses in general... much thinner than the kerf, by about 1/2; a bit thinner than kerf; and darn near the same thickness as kerf.
The latter two will be much heavier than the thinner plate blades. They will have no flex if you try to bend them. They will be much heavier. They will have a high, long, bell-like tone if you hold them by the hole and strike them with your knuckle.
The thinner plate blade will have a bit of flex when you try to bend it. It will feel much lighter than you think it should. When struck with the knuckle, the sound will be a lower pitched and shorter tone.
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I'll check 'em out.
Many Thanks
"Law Without Equity Is No Law At All. It Is A Form Of Jungle Rule."
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Much later. Would first require a new and better TS. And I'm now too old/decrepit to lug/setup. So, much, Much, MUCH later. :-)
Will
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On 10/11/2012 2:29 PM, Wilfred Xavier Pickles wrote:

Seriously I put a new Forrest "REGULAR KERF 40 tooth WWII on my saw just under 2 years ago, the job paid for it. Since I have mounted that blade I have built over 100 drawers, 40+ MDF kitchen door and drawer blanks, several components to that kitchen re-do, A Murphy bed with matching tower cabinets on both sides, a queen side bed with drawers underneath, a quilters cutting table, an 8'x8' wall pantry, a corner curio cabinet, three double cabinet book cases, an additional full wall of book cases, and a bedroom TV chest with drawers and 7 or 8 picture frames. The blade is still cutting quite well without having been sharpened yet.
I know you feel you need a better saw for this blade but you really do not. Prior to buying a cabinet saw 13 or so years ago I used a good quality Systematic regular kerf blade on my 1hp Craftsman TS. It cut better than any think kerf blade I had used.
A Forrest could be the last blade you ever buy, maybe. ;~) I keep 2 Forrest blades on hand. When one goes to Forrest for resharpening I mount the other for the next 3~4 years of use. You will save money on the long run and never be able to blame the blade for poor results.
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wrote:

WHAT? You mean that one blade did your entire Bridge of Sighs Bedroom Suite without being sharpened? ;) That's a good blade.

I finally upgraded from HF to a Freud blade for my circ saw and it really is an improvement. Well, was, until the blade height adjustment loosened and it started cutting the blacktop. She cuts a mite slower nowadays. I'll replace it some day soon.
-- Energy and persistence alter all things. --Benjamin Franklin
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On Wednesday, October 10, 2012 4:54:36 PM UTC-7, Wilfred Xavier Pickles wrote:

For A long time I used thin kerf but have gravitated towards full kerf and find I get less chatter on rips so less sanding of edges.
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On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 22:34:10 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com"

Never went the ripping blade route. I've always used a 60 tooth combination blade. Did fine for ripping and crosscut nicely on the veneered plywood.
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On 10/11/2012 1:24 AM, Dave wrote:

Kinda agree, using a cabinet saw I used a decent brand rip blade long enough to dull it and never saw/realized the point of switching blades from a WWII.
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On Wednesday, October 10, 2012 11:24:44 PM UTC-7, Upscale wrote:

To each his own I guess. I might leave in a cross cut blade if I have one rip. Rarely use a rip for cross cuts, unless they are not so important. Rip blades do cut about twice as fast. Takes me less than a minute to change blades and just kind of do it without thinking. I doubt you can rip cherry with a cross cut very often without some burn. But as I said, to each his own.
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On 10/11/2012 1:18 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

that ripping (cutting with te grain direction) will be much better with a rip blade. Never went the ripping blade route. I've always used a 60 tooth combination blade. Did fine for ripping and crosscut nicely on the veneered plywood.

Rarely use a rip for cross cuts, unless they are not so important. Rip blades do cut about twice as fast. Takes me less than a minute to change blades and just kind of do it without thinking. I doubt you can rip cherry with a cross cut very often without some burn. But as I said, to each his own.

The trick to not changing blades is to use a combination or general purpose blade. I would not recommend cross cutting with a rip nor ripping with a cross cut blade.
Now if you have 2 table saw, that might change considerations.
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On Thursday, October 11, 2012 12:51:21 PM UTC-7, Leon wrote:

I have one I throw on when making plywood boxes, etc. for around the shop or sets and stage furniture for my daughters school, etc.
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On 10/11/2012 3:53 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

2012 11:24:44 PM UTC-7, Upscale wrote: >> On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 22:34:10 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com" >You will find that ripping (cutting with te grain direction) will be much better with a rip blade. Never went the ripping blade route. I've always used a 60 tooth combination blade. Did fine for ripping and crosscut nicely on the veneered plywood. > > To each his own I guess. I might leave in a cross cut blade if I have one rip. Rarely use a rip for cross cuts, unless they are not so important. Rip blades do cut about twice as fast. Takes me less than a minute to change blades and just kind of do it without thinking. I doubt you can rip cherry with a cross cut very often without some burn. But as I said, to each his own. > The trick to not changing blades is to use a combination or general purpose blade. I would not recommend cross cutting with a rip nor ripping with a cross cut blade. Now if you have 2 table saw, that might change considerations.

similar (good enough is OK) jobs and not the typical furniture pieces I am usually building. And even then only because the cabinet guys usually oversize their face frame rips and clean up the edges in bundles ganged up in the planer.If you believe that a "good" combo blade is only appropriate for basic cabinet work something was/is not right. I no longer own a jointer as I never used the one I had and I never over size a cut. I get what might be considered perfect cuts 98% of the time and sanding is most often not necessary other than to prep the cut surface to be consistent with the face surface for a consistent application of a stain or finish. Any tooth marks are pretty much non existent.
I sell my work too and it is pretty intricate. I don't tolerate sub par results from my equipment and don't use another machine to clean up what another has not left done properly.
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On Thursday, October 11, 2012 9:26:03 PM UTC-7, Leon wrote:

I don't dispute your claim. Sounds like you have a well tuned instrument (saw) and good technique.
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On 10/12/2012 12:01 AM, SonomaProducts.com wrote:

2012 12:51:21 PM UTC-7, Leon wrote: >> On 10/11/2012 1:18 PM, SonomaProducts.com wrote: > On Wednesday, October 10, 2012 11:24:44 PM UTC-7, Upscale wrote: >> On Wed, 10 Oct 2012 22:34:10 -0700 (PDT), "SonomaProducts.com" >You will find that ripping (cutting with te grain direction) will be much better with a rip blade. Never went the ripping blade route. I've always used a 60 tooth combination blade. Did fine for ripping and crosscut nicely on the veneered plywood. > > To each his own I guess. I might leave in a cross cut blade if I have one rip. Rarely use a rip for cross cuts, unless they are not so important. Rip blades do cut about twice as fast. Takes me less than a minute to change blades and just kind of do it without thinking. I doubt you can rip cherry with a cross cut very often without some burn. But as I said, to each his own. > The trick to not changing blades is to use a combination or general purpose blade. I would not recommend cross cutting with a rip nor ripping with a cross cut blade. Now if you hav e 2 table saw, that might change considerations. > > IMNSHO combo blades are only approriate for basic cabinet work or other similar (good enough is OK) jobs and not the typical furniture pieces I am usually building. And even then only because the cabinet guys usually oversize their face frame rips and clean up the edges in bundles ganged up in the planer. If you believe that a "good" combo blade is only appropriate for basic cabinet work something was/is not right. I no longer own a jointer as I never used the one I had and I never over size a cut. I get what might be considered perfect cuts 98% of the time and sanding is most often not necessary other than to prep the cut surface to be consistent with the face surface for a consistent application of a stain or finish. Any tooth marks are pretty much non existent. I sell my work too and it is pretty intricate. I don't tolerate sub par results from my equipment and don't use another machine to clean up what another has not left done properly.

Well I do only use a 40 tooth general blade which might make the big difference and I seldom rip material thicker than 3/4" thick, another big factor.
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