pushfit are they reliable?

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Plenty of car radiator parts are fabricated from plastic, which handles water at a running temp of around 100 deg C, and with presumably a margin of safety on top. So it seems that plastic is a suitable material for hot water - even our kettle is plastic.
I think its more a case that the tooling for large plastic structures is expensive and not viable when cheaper materials / tooling is available.
Nick
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arise.
ask
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The expectancy of most car parts is less than a plumbing or heating system. If a car has done 15 years it is deemed to have done very good service. Many of the components during those 15 years would have been replaced. No one expects a top radiator hose to last 15 years.

expensive
I think it a case of, that the current plastic offerings are not suitable for storing large volumes of hot water that may overboil here and there. I'm sure they can come close, but it will be expensive to do so. Look at the cost of plastic v copper pipe.
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*some* car parts.

The top radiator hose is not likely to be plastic. I would be very surprised to see the plastic endcap of a radiator fail in 15 years. The core fairly likely but then that is made from a much inferior material (hint: not plastic :))

Eh? Isn't that the arguement? Its not that it can't be done just that there is little economic point in it. Plastic pipes/pushfits have a lot of advantages despite the extra cost. Its harder to see how to justify the expense for a hot water tank IMHO.
Darren
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wrote:

I would say "most".

It is a type of plastic, certainly not metal.

You mean "inferior quality".

suitable
I'm
The argument is that it "can't" be done 100% successfully. If they could have done it they would have by now.

Alas, far too many disadvantages, in which many bury their heads in the sand when assessing.
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Not where I live. Water is so acidic copper pipe rots through in under 10 years !!
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Stick to the recommended distances and its fine, it sags a bit but this isn't a problem.
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David

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wrote:

horizontal
Best just use copper on long horizontal runs, then no problems at all.
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[snip]

But the whole point of using plastic is to avoid joints in long runs. I have not had problems with plastic sagging.
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Well wait then.
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It sags between clips which isn't a problem
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David @chaplehouse.demon.co.uk wrote:
Hello David

Is there any advantage to clipping it along the length when, say, it's running in an underfloor void?
Is there any disadvantages to letting it just lie on the ground? (Apart from mechanical wear from movement)
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I don't see any great advantages or disadvantages either way really.
Most of mine is fixed because it would have either got in the way for future access, or just because I could and it makes for a neat job.
But have areas where the pipe was just pushed in one end and then out the other, and just left to it's own devices.
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Hello chris

That's what I thought. I've used MDPE a lot and that's tough stuff, but since my screwfix stuff didn't make the "next day" delivery time I still don't know what the speedfit is like. (Moan, whinge)
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wrote:

Water could build up there covering the pipe. Heat cold be extracted from the pipe too.

Inside the house?

You will not be impressed.
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My 1st floor runs are just laid flat on boards, technically I don't see any reason why it can't just be left lying on the ground, assuming you mean under the floor boards so chances of mechanical damage aren't a problem, mind you plastic pipe is a lot less susceptible to damage than copper and of course it won't corrode or develop pin holes, sound like a good solution all round.
cue John...
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On Wed, 3 Dec 2003 12:07:51 +0000, David @chaplehouse.demon.co.uk wrote:

Oh I know that, what I was trying to say was I didn't try the hair dryer trick because I didn't think it was worth it - the pipe's designed to carry up to 92 degrees C, so an ickle hairdryer wouldn't make a blip on allowing flexibility. -- cheers,
witchy/binarydinosaurs
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On Thu, 04 Dec 2003 10:37:57 +0000, Witchy wrote:

Heat does improve the flexibility. However why bother just get Hep2O pipe which is flexible.
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On Thu, 04 Dec 2003 19:11:59 +0000, "Ed Sirett"

If our local shed stocks it I'll give it a go. I always seem to need it when normal merchants are closed :) Pity really, since the local merchant is 5 minute's drive away! -- cheers,
witchy/binarydinosaurs
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Hep2O doesn't seem to available in the sheds, they only seem to stock Speedfit
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