Thinset instead of Grout?

On very narrow joints, is there any reason I can't use thinset instead of grout?
Since there is 10 lbs of thinset left in the bag, and it is the same color as the grout I chose, I'm tempted.
Somebody stop me if this is a mistake...
Thanks in advance.
KB
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Both are portland cement plus sand. Thinset is hidden and so it usually is composed of the cheapest grey portland cement. White or colored grout uses white portland cement which is more expensive than grey, it can be left white or tinted to any grout color. Since grout is non-structural just about any cementitious base would suffice, unless you are looking for decreased water permeability. So if it is the same color, go ahead and use it but you MUST seal it.
Kyle Boatright wrote:

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buy the real thing the thinset will likely need cleaned and resealed every year. for a few nucks why create another yearly project?
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Kyle Boatright wrote:

As long as the joints are wide enough for sanded grout, thinset is fine. No real difference other than color.
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dadiOH
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Thinset and grout are not the same. They are formulated only for their specific purpose. If you had a few small joints to fill, such as in a small repair, you could use the thinset as grout.
On "very narrow joints" as you describe, you shouldn't use sanded material, as thinset is. The grout also has properties that make it set-up quickly, so it can be worked to it's finished look. Thinset is designed to do the opposite- stay fluid for a long time, thereby washing-out the joint as you sponge it.
Spend a few bucks and get the correct grout and save yourself some work. Do it right.
thetiler
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replying to Kyle Boatright, Outdoorman wrote: I did a glass floor mosaic tile in my shower and used Custom white polymer modified thinset for the thinset and grout. Side note, I had to do 2-3 runs, as it didn't fill the cracks as as well as sanded grout, but 4 years later it's working great. I used really heavy coats of 511 for the sealer and let it cure for 72 hours before use. I think is much stronger than the sanded grout. Initially I planned to use sanded grout but my trowelled sub straight lines were too thick and the thinset came up between a lot of the tiles, that's when the idea struck to just also grout with thinset. I also used the logic Portland cement is Portland cement. It was an accidental success.
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Uncle Monster posted for all of us...

The gerbils were the ones doing the tunneling. He didn't notice the cover over the booby trap. They have relocated and are thriving.
--
Tekkie

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