Move washer/dryer to other side of wall

I want to move my stackable washer/dryer to the other side of the same wall. Negatives : it will be on carpet. Is it as simple as cutting a hole in the drywall on the other side of the wall, accessing the water/power lines and moving the machines? If this is not DIY friendly, what kind of contractor do I need? There are obviously already water lines because the washer is on the other side of the wall. Thanks!
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On Thursday, February 2, 2017 at 9:14:06 PM UTC-5, Leeny wrote:

What is your plan? To leave a hole in the wall and just run the power cord through the hole to original receptacle? The same plan for the water lines?
Amateurish at best and probably not to code.
What about the drain and the dryer vent?
Now, if you were planning on installing a new receptacle and water connections and then closing up the drywall (IOW, a proper installation) then the DIY question is up to you.
Do you know how to properly wire a receptacle? If not, do you have the skills to learn? Do you know how to take care of the plumbing?
What about the drain and the dryer vent?
It's all DIY-able if you know how (or can learn how) to wire, plumb and repair drywall. If you were planning on just running wires and washer hoses through the hole in the wall, the call around and talk to a few local handy-persons/contractors and get some quotes. After three or four calls, you'll figure out what type of person to hire.
What about the drain and dryer vent? I keep asking that because bringing power and water *to* the washer and dryer is the easy part. Getting rid of the water and the moisture laden air may be the part that makes this a major project.
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On Fri, 03 Feb 2017 02:14:02 GMT, Leeny

If everything is served through the wall cavity it is pretty easy. The water and electricity probably is. The drain and vent may be the issue. Since you have a drywall patch and paint coming anyway, open up a decent size hole so you can flip the boxes and plumbing to the other side. It should be pretty surgical on the other side if you have access to the back. Patching a big rectangular hole in drywall is about as easy as it gets. Just cut from halfway across the stud face and take out a piece. Cut the new piece to size and screw it in. Tape, mud and paint. If this is a utility area and you can live with an access hole, use a piece of plywood and frame it.
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On 2/2/2017 9:14 PM, Leeny wrote:

Do you have plumbing experience?
Could be simple if you know how to move the connections. You'd have to open the wall, install new faucets and standpipe for the drain, then close up the wall on the other side. Same with the dryer vent.
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Whack out the suggested dyi steps then cut uot a sizeable part of carpet an d replace with nice tile and new edging or lay down some easy linolium. A p ro would knock this out same day. I would be 2 days with beer breaks. Addit ional painting would take me several months.
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On Friday, February 3, 2017 at 4:23:51 AM UTC-5, Thomas wrote:

and replace with nice tile and new edging or lay down some easy linolium. A pro would knock this out same day. I would be 2 days with beer breaks. Add itional painting would take me several months.
A pro would do it in a single day? Including repairing the drywall in the old location? Painting? Also it depends on whether he intends to follow local code and law, ie take out permits if necessary and use licensed pros. Around here, NJ code would require two permits and plumbervpros aren't licensed and don't do electrical work and vice-versa. If you have the skills, know what you're doing and there are no show stoppers, eg the dryer vent goes out through a side wall in the current location, like mine does, then it's a DIY job that isn't a big deal.
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On Friday, February 3, 2017 at 8:06:47 PM UTC-5, trader_4 wrote:

t and replace with nice tile and new edging or lay down some easy linolium. A pro would knock this out same day. I would be 2 days with beer breaks. A dditional painting would take me several months.

We really don't know enough to be able to answer his questions.
One question I have is this:
Once he moves the unit to the "other side of the same wall" is the goal to remove all traces on the previous installation? No vent, no drain, no exposed plumbing in the original location. Nothing to indicate that there was ever a washer/dryer in that room.
We don't where the drain is or where the dryer vent is. As I said in an earlier post...
Bringing power and water *to* the washer and dryer is the easy part. (That' s really all he asked about.) Getting rid of the water and the moisture laden air may be the part that makes this a major project - especially if the goa l is to eliminate all traces of the current set-up.
It would help to know a little bit more about the "outgoing" part of the current installation.
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On 2/3/2017 8:06 PM, trader_4 wrote:

I wonder how many people would actually get a permit for a job like that. A good handyman type can easily do both aspects. If I was not doing it myself that is what I'd do.
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On Friday, February 3, 2017 at 11:40:03 PM UTC-5, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

The people who would get permits are mostly those that would have to get a pro to do it. I hear you.
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On Fri, 3 Feb 2017 21:03:51 -0800 (PST), trader_4

It just takes someone who knows how to line up ducks. My wife would bang that out in a day, using the 3 trades (electrical/plumbing/ drywall) necessary. It is all in having reliable trades, scheduling them and working around the inspector. Inspection is the wild card but on a little job like this but you may only see one inspector once if they have "1&2 family" guys. (who can do the whole FEPA/C in residential) They might want to see the electrical trim out (2 receptacles installed in the boxes with plates on them) but I would accept a picture and just inspect the rough.
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