pushfit are they reliable?

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I've used it and hate it - just that feeling of quality and reliability that is lacking. Will not buy it again, ever.

Used loads of Hep2O on a number of properties and never had a problem with it, provided it gets pushed into the fitting sufficiently. Buy the 'proper' pipe cutting tool or blag your local merchants into giving you one for free. Always use pipe inserts. Barrier pipe is supposed to be better for CH systems but I don't know of a single plumber (all CORGI registered) who bothers paying the extra. The only drawback of not using it is that British Gas will not then cover it as part of their 'breakdown insurance' packages.
The pipe is reasonably priced but fittings can be expensive. You just need to know where to go. I can get hold of any Hep fitting for 1 each if anyone is interested, although you would need to make it a pack big enough to be worthwhile. E-mail me direct if you want some.
Overall, pushfit is a boon and much quicker that copper, without any fire risk. Let me hope I never live to regret saying that!

Screwfix is selling some copper push-fits. They look ok but not sure of their quality in service. They are much lower profile and yesterday I put a few in where the pipework would be visible. We shall see how they fare.
Just some thoughts. Rob
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I know what you mean.

What do you expect from plumbers. Non-barrier is fine in an opoen veted system, but should be used in a sealed system. Marley, Spedfit and Osma Gold only have barrier pipe.

I see why.

Use cheap copper pipr and pushfit, much better all around.

New to me. Must be very recent.

There are a number of makers with a history of quality around: Conex, Tectite, etc..

They are probably make by a third party, hence the low [profile. John Guest, originally a toy maker, are a plastic company and that is where they make big bucks.
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That is not quite correct. The issue of oxygen diffusion is not related to whether the system is open or sealed but whether it is a closed circulation system or not - i.e. the same water circulating continuously; and the fact that heating systems normally contain ferrous metal components - e.g. radiators.
For DHW and potable water services, it becomes a non-issue because the water already contains a fair amount of oxygen anyway.
.andy
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wrote:

You are right: again..
What do you expect from plumbers. Non-barrier is fine in an open vented system, but should not be used in a sealed system.
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No. The issue is not between open and sealed CH systems (both should use barrier pipe) but between CH systems and DHW/potable water.

.andy
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wrote:

You are correct. But an open vented system with correct inhibitor will see little if no deterioration.
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On Sat, 29 Nov 2003 12:17:20 +0000, Andy Hall wrote:

red herring put about by BG for there own reasons. [1] Although I have no data to hand for oxygen diffusion rates through >1mm of plastic, ot does seem counter intuitive that oxygen could diffuse into water under pressure from outside.
All this has to be set against the oxygen diffusion that possible with a F&E tank.
Anyone got soem real data around, is the Hepworths advisor about?
[1] There might be a number of reaons for this: A) BG workforce conservatism. B) Possible greater reveue from selling a new installation. C) Possible greater realiability by forcing a replacement of the system.
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On Sat, 29 Nov 2003 15:44:43 +0000, "Ed Sirett"

It is a real phenomenon.
For example, there is an ISO standard in progress on its measurement.
http://tinyurl.com/wztd
http://tinyurl.com/wztk
It does seem counterintuitive that oxygen would diffuse through plastic when the mechanical pressure on one side is higher than the other.
However, the phenomenon is going on at a molecular level and is related to concentrations rather than mechanical pressure..
Diffusion is basically the tendency of molecules to move from an area of higher concentration to one of lower concentration. The oxygen diffuses through because the concentration of molecules in the air is less than that in the water.
Many types of plastic have a very large molecule in comparison to oxygen which increases the diffusion rate. There are even specific plastics for biological and medical purposes (e.g. dialysis) designed to maximise diffusion - e.g. www.visking.com

.andy
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|Doncaster, UK http://www.hepworthplumbing.co.uk |DN12 1BY
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On Sun, 30 Nov 2003 20:10:33 +0000, text wrote:

over!
Many thanks - I always suspected that the oxygen diffusion through plastic pipe was not a real problem - although I always use barrier pipe since that is what my merchant stocks.
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|Doncaster, UK http://www.hepworthplumbing.co.uk |DN12 1BY
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writes

I don't know if that's good advice, I think my house was plumbed with cheap imported copper pipe which is why I'm getting pinholes appearing. I would pay a bit more and get better quality, its worth it in the long term, unless you buy two cheap heating/water systems and if one fails use the other one, simple!
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I said cheap, as compared to expensive plastic pipe. I did not say buy inferior quality.
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writes

if you didn't mean that you should have phrased it differently otherwise people won't take you seriously
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Did you have specific problems?
Have you used the newer type of fittings with the twist-lock and the inserts with additional O-ring?

Says it all, doesn't it. Buying on price and not the appropriate product for the job.
They probably don't put inhibitor in either - another way of ensuring repeat business.

That's probably a blessing....... .andy
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Can anyone vouch (or not) for the quality of the kit that Screwfix sell? Described as "Pushfit" - presumably that's not the brandname - is it an own brand or someone else's rebadged?
Thanks David
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When I used it a few years back it was all speedfit stuff. No problems so far. AFAIK, they still sell speedfit although the design has changed since I did our kitchen - I think it now has an extra twist lock or something.
Darren
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Speedfit? Please!!!

Osma Gold and Marley Equator are about the best.
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On Sun, 14 Dec 2003 16:32:11 +0000, Lobster wrote:

The copper stuff (p 205 of Catalogue issue 72) is Conex.
I think if you google this thread back a few weeks you'll get a reasonable spread of view points.
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Well, I have lost track of this post but I certainly wouldn't say Speedfit was quality kit. They are absolute crap.
As for the Screwfix stuff, I bought a load of the copper push-fit stuff to try them out. I am sending them back tomorrow. Every single fitting has leaked on heating systems. I am very dissapointed.
If it helps, I have replaced every one with Hep2O and no problems so far. No problems in all the years I have been using Hep either. I cannot commetn on the other makes since I have no experience of them.
HTH Rob
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