Condensing Tumble Driers

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Martin Angove wrote:

Many years ago, we had a washline running on a pulley from just outside the window of the back bedroom, to a tree across the parking area. I didn't need to go up and down the stairs, and it worked fine, except when the weather was bitterly cold - when I wouldn't want to dry things outdoors anyway.
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So irons don't consume electric then? Well probably not in your house. Your wife probably has a flat iron heated in the fire.

[snip]
Oh bog off back to the to the 19th Century. >:(
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Nah, I'd miss uk.d-i-y too much :-)
I know it's not really my job to comment about the ironing because (luckily for me) my wife does that job, and I know how much I'd hate it if it were my job instead. Having said that, she probably does more than I would (my "working" t-shirts for example).
The point I was trying to make was that tumble-drying isn't the only option for drying clothes, and that even "old fashioned" air-dried clothes *can* finish up with a minimum of creases, especially if you are careful in your choice of styles and fabrics as you have explained.
On top of that, using the washing line is completely free, and not only is it free but anyone trying to reduce their personal energy use (we're getting into "green" arguments here) will make a great saving by only using a tumble dryer when absolutely necessary. In these circumstances it makes perfect sense (to me) to have the wet part of the laundry close to the washing line - usually downstairs and out the back though as someone else has pointed out, not always!
Hwyl!
M.
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NO!!! Cheap condensing dryers are a waste of space. Get a Bosch, and no less.
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life
I Have the bosch classixx condensor - EXCELLENT!

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Just bought a Bosch 6920 integrated condensor. It's got more buttons and lights than a 1960's Star Trek episode. Of course, all you need to do to actually use it is load up and press "Start", but all the options could be found rather intimidating.
Christian.
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Condensing driers are much more energy efficient. Instead of blowing hot air outside they reuse it round and round, just extracting the water content. They dont blow heat out at all.
However, a fast spin washer is more sensible in most cases. With 1300 or 1400 spin you dont need a tumble.
Regards, NT
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That I agree with. Just bought a 1600 spin washing machine that should cut down on energy bills quite considerably.

That I don't. Are you seriously suggesting that you can wear clothes straight out of a 1400 spin washing machine? You couldn't even put them away without them rotting.
Christian.
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Well, lemme think. Nope, I dont remember suggesting that. One only need leave stuff out overnight and put it away in the morning. With ironing even less drying time is needed.
Regards, NT
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life
both
I disagree. I think a fast spin mashes creases in. Fine if you love ironing. I HATE ironing.
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snipped-for-privacy@meeow.co.uk (N. Thornton) wrote:

The question is, how do they extract the water? I heard tell that some use copious amounts of cold water so although your heat-energy argument could hold in that instance, surely the water-conservation argument is lost? Presumably (since it's in a bedroom) Suz's drier doesn't do this, so how does it work?
Just curious...
Hwyl!
M.
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Don't fight technology, live with it: http://www.livtech.co.uk /
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(N. Thornton) wrote:

They do. Mine does.
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On Sat, 11 Oct 2003 21:22:56 +0100, Martin Angove

There are two circulating fans, a small one on the internal circuit which blows through a resistance heater and then to the clothes, the airflow circuit on the one I looked at used the door as a plenum. After it leaves the clothes the moist air passes into an aluminium cross flow heat exchanger. A larger fan blows ambient air in over the secondary side of this and vents to the room. As the moist air cools below its dew point in the heat exchanger it drips into a container, there is also the option to take a drain to waste. The internal circulation fan is much smaller than the heat exchanger fan.
AJH
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Snore.. but true. Sucks cold air in through metal heat exchanger. Blows hot wet air through other side of exchanger. Condensation occurs. Drained off (into removeable tank or plumbed to drain). Hot dry air back into room. Makes soft noise. Baby sleeps.
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Snore= Boring?

Unlikely to suck the air after it has been warmed, by recovering latent heat from the heat exchanger, as this increases the necessary fan power, more usual to blow ambient air. The salient feature is that there are two separate circulations.
AJH
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wrote:

I'm sure this is all true, but I wouldn't know as I slumped forward into my dinner and nearly asphyxiated in the mash half way through.
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quote -
In "combo washer/dryers" (i.e. machines that can BOTH wash and dry the clothes), the ventless condenser system is also widely used, but in these cases the condensers are water-cooled. During a dry cycle, several gallons of cold water is used to condense the moisture evaporated from the clothes, which again is pumped away through the drain line. Most of the "combos" currently available in North America use this method - i.e. units from Equator, Splendide, Malber, Haier, Quietline, Thor, LG, and Eurotech. Note that unlike the air-cooled design, these models do NOT significantly heat the indoor air in one's laundry room - but on the other hand, the fact that they use extra water during the dry cycle must be taken into consideration, especially for anyone on a very limited (or expensive) water supply.
Answers both those points
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Eh? Surely you mean: "NO!!!- buy two cheap dryers instead. Dry washing twice as quickly as with one expensive one. Then when the first one breaks you have no downtime."
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no
No! I mean "Cheap condensing dryers are a waste of space. Get a Bosch, and no less." It to do what it is supposed to do. That is dispense the moisture in the tray. Cheap ones do not. Got it?
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Could get a large gas dryer. We bought one second hand for 70 (loot.com). Get a handyman with a hole cutter to make hole or rent one. Get plumber to connect gas, or you do it and get a plumber to check it out. Should come to around the 200 mark and it's way cheaper than electricity. Neil>
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