Compressed air distibution in garage

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15 mm copper tube is approved for the distribution of gases in laboratories and hospitals. Oxygen is commonly provided to the bedside via 15 mm tube with soldered fittings.
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Copper will be fine, you just have to make sure you use either compression fittings or HARD soldered (brazed) joints. That's how all the medical gases in your local hospital are piped (working pressure max 7 bar).
Dave
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sheet
max.
A properly made soft soldered joint should be fine for compressed air up to 100 psi.
You would have no qualms in using soft soldered joints for a rising main, and the pressure there could easily be more.
I would however avoid soft soldered joints where there might be compressor vibrations.
Andrew Mawson
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On Wed, 3 Dec 2003 16:53:38 +0000 (UTC), "Andrew Mawson"

Although it is typical to connect directly to the receiver so that the pressure may well be 10bar or so.

There are special flexible attachment hoses to go from receiver to pipework.......

.andy
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around
can
the
Bundy tube (thin wall galvanised steel) is the usual stuff for airlines under about 1/2" or so. Not only will it take the fittings without needing to adapt them, but it should be cheaper than copper. Look for any airline supplier in yellow pages or a trade directory. When copper is used for airlines, it is normal to use fully annealed copper, but that may be because copper tends to be used only where there are difficult shapes to make.
Colin Bignell
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On Mon, 1 Dec 2003 15:35:54 -0000, "Alan"

I would include a ball valve at this point to allow instant shut-off. This is very handy if(when) a hose experiences a failure

Copper will require that you be gentle when operating the quick disconnect fittings. If you use plastic, ensure that your compressor delivers air at a reasonable temperature. This is not usually a problem if your compressor has a standard tank type reservoir and you do not run it continuously (such as when painting a car) .

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Last compressed air line which went into our factory was done in 22mm copper pipe. I was surprised, but apparently the latest regs allow it.
Dave
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On Thu, 01 Jan 2004 02:44:20 -0600, Bill Coffel

What's the reason for that, Bill? Not that one should treat any compressed air fittings with other than respect.....

.andy
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