What size electrical junction box fits a 1-inch diameter cable anyway?

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Finally! Good grief!

.
Part of this comes from experience. One inch conduit is so large that it makes no sense that it would be used to hook up your pool motor. Once you have some experience, it's easy to recognize what size it is just by looking. Apparently, it's not so easy to tell by looking at a pic. You did have that one recent pic that shows the end of the 1/2", but the hole in that compared to the thickenss of the wall, and the different colors, made me think it was some kind of bushing inside a 3/4" conduit

As DD pointed out, it's not really a one inch box. It's a 4" box with one inch holes. Just so you don't wind up going over to ACE and asking for such a thing. The dopes they have over there might spend an hour looking for one.

Well, I guess that's why even the right end wouldn't go into the box threads.
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Completely....
1) That elbow is meant to attach to your existing flex. The end with straight thread (the bigger end) makes up the water connection to the flex, The smaller end looks to be 1/2".... in screws into just able an wet location box.
2) The "box end" of conduit connectors are sized like water pipe. RIgid conduit is sized like water pipe. Checkout conduit sizes.... http://www.home4c.com/conduit.htm
3) Conduits don't have widths...they have diameters.
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On Wed, 15 May 2013 07:01:18 -0700, DD_BobK wrote:

I guess I missed the clue stamped right on the elbow all along!

The enigma turns out to be that the elbow was 1/2 inch on both sides!
The clue I missed is that it was clearly stamped 1/2 inch, but it never occurred to me that this meant *both sides* were half inch (yes, even the side that measures out at 1 inch).
Note: The straight-thru connectors are stamped 1/2NPT.
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UPDATE:
It's mostly done. Thanks for all the advice. I learned a lot.

A lesson learned is those patent-pending one-piece connectors stink!

You have to spin the entire cable to remove them!
That's the problem I was trying to avoid in the first place!
Tomorrow I'll pick up two more two-piece connectors and finish the job.
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Only if it's going into a box with threaded holes or the pump motor that you have, which is threaded too. If it goes into a box with blanks, then you use the provided nut to secure it on the inside. To remove, you take the nut off and the connector comes out. You're right, they don't work well for threaded connections.

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On Thu, 16 May 2013 07:25:01 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

In hindsight, I should have shopped around more for a non-threaded junction box, but no hardware store I went to had any.
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Not to get critical, but I can't help but wonder at his choice of locations for elbows. Like why they are used at the top of the pic, where it looks like the conduit could have gone straight in. An elbow on the motor on the right and an elbow where the left motor conduit enters the box would seem more logical.
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On Thu, 16 May 2013 09:15:33 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

That was a compromise.
Having lived the horrors of threaded elbows, I had intended on replacing all the elbows with straight-through connections instead.
However, I then realized I strongly disliked *all* the straight-through connections also (none seem particularly water tight) ... so I decided to keep the original elbows, which, at least, were clearly water tight.
In hindsight, were I to rip it all up and start again: a) I'd have bought a non-threaded junction box! b) I would have use straight-through connections at the junction box c) And, at the motor, I would have drilled out the threads and used a non- threaded elbow so that it could easily be removed simply by removing the nut.
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wrote:

choice of locations for elbows.   Like why they are used at the top of the pic, where it looks like the conduit could have gone straight in.  An elbow on the motor on the right and an elbow where the left motor conduit enters the box would seem more logical.<<<
+1
I don't understand.... why the new box at all?? Just run new conduit & new conductors all from the control panel. No box on the slab. No intermediate connections.
Now he's got a hacked up fix to an original hack job..... at least consistency is being maintained.
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On Thu, 16 May 2013 22:26:49 -0700, DD_BobK wrote:

I took (most of) your advice and reconfigured the wiring:

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On Thu, 16 May 2013 12:29:34 -0700, Oren wrote:

Done.

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On Fri, 17 May 2013 09:35:30 -0700, Oren wrote:

Auuuuurgh. *now* I understand what you were trying to tell me! You are wholly correct! In fact, while I was testing the system just now, I kept kicking the concrete paver, and thinking I should have moved it up a foot or so, out of the way.
That's *exactly* what you had forseen, and were desperately *trying* to tell me! Mea culpa. I did what I thought you had suggested, only I didn't fully understand it.
Next time, I'm just going to put a straight shot conduit from panel to motor - but - if I were to have the junction box, I would move it closer to the panel so that it's more out of the way!
Sigh. (slaps head).
Anyway, since the leaks moved backward (now they're coming from the underside of the pump to motor interface!), I'm glad the paver is there to keep the electrical box dry!

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I

DDD-
That's got to be the most unusual wiring job I've ever seen in 45 years of DIY & real engineering too.
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On Fri, 17 May 2013 22:12:52 -0700, DD_BobK wrote:

It was my first conduit wiring job ever.
I designed it specifically to make it easy to remove the pumps when the covers are permanently rusted onto the motors (such that the wires can't be disconnected from the pumps).
For that, it works.
However, in (my now more experienced) hindsight, I'd just cut the conduit when the end caps rust on the conduit - since I'm no longer scared about conduit wiring.
And, when that happens, I'd just replace the entire cut conduit with a straight run right into the controller, which will be easier and even cheaper than adding the junction box. And more reliable.
I never said I didn't learn any lessons after having done a task.
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Two things:
1 - Do you actually have to take the whole end off the end of the motor, which I assume means removing the 4 very long motor bolts? I haven't done a pool motor, but the typical motors I've worked with, they had a small cover plate over the wiring connections that was easy to remove. Especially if you put some grease on the screws before assembly.
2 - If you hook it up direct, you can leave some extra slack in the conduit and some extra wire at the controller box, so that if you need to cut it off at the motor to remove, you will have enough conduit and wire left so you can reconnect without redoing it. have enough conduit
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On Mon, 20 May 2013 06:29:32 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

You must take the endcap off the motor, but it's two short steel bolts (about an inch long).
If you don't take the endcap off the motor, you can't unscrew the ground wire (which is bolted down); nor can you unclip the two power wires (as they're clipped on).

I understand; but there is no cover plate on these motors. In addition, the bolts are soft rustable steel; and they sit outside. Makes no sense to me that they're not stainless steel bolts.

I understand. Makes sense.
I saw a video while I was looking for motor rebuilding where they drill out the bolt heads - which would be the first thing to try.
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Why not replace them with SS? And I'd put some grease on them.
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On Mon, 20 May 2013 16:58:35 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

The hard part, of course, is sourcing the stainless steel bolts.
For example, the "real" rust problem is these foot-long bolts!

It is beyond me how they can make bolts that thin, that long, and that vulnerable out of soft steel for a motor that is expected to be outside.

As per the suggestions here, I put anti-seize on the cap bolts, and, next time I remove the long bolts, I'll put anti-seize on them too!
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Unless they are some hard to find size, HD or Lowes, ACE hardware. Also boat supply places, like West Marine
.
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On Mon, 20 May 2013 20:33:00 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

If I could find replacement through bolts, my last three or four motors might have been more salvageable:

Googling, I found drastic removal of those super long "through bolts" referenced in this informative (but a bit obnoxious) video by Joe Tomorrow at http://wetheadpumprepair.com
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ogvSkRUCamc

Of course, while cutting the heads off (as shown above) allows the motor to be disassembled, it still leaves the last threaded inch of the thru bolts stuck fast inside the motor housing.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6XgzmDE3Rdc

I called wetheadpumprepair at 631-671-8302 and they said to use the contact form to locate the desired through bolts. As always, I will update you on what I find out so others can follow in our footsteps.

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