What size electrical junction box fits a 1-inch diameter cable anyway?

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On Thu, 16 May 2013 08:26:33 -0700, Oren wrote:

But I *wanted* the junction box!
For two reasons: a) Ease of disconnection b) Freedom to swap in emergencies
With the four new unions and the junction box, I now can move the pumps and motors about if/when I need to. There are other similar pumps on the property (e.g., for the koi pond that is currently a koi swamp due to the pump being out of commission - but that's another story).
I've been pining for that junction box ever since I first started taking the motors off to fix them.
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I know you really, really wanted that box. But after looking at the final pictures that show a good view of the wiring on the ends of the motors, I have to agree with Oren. With what I see there, all that you need to do to remove a motor is:
Remove the wires from the terminals Unscew the nut that is on the conduit outside the box Pull off the conduit. Work the wires out with a pair of needle nose pliers.
Unless I'm missing something, I don't see why that can't be done in just a few minutes. And you should rarely have to do even that, because those pumps last a long time.
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On Fri, 17 May 2013 05:12:37 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I must, belatedly, agree.
I think all my cursing and swearing from the initial motor removals had swayed me, before we ever started.
If you recall, the original elbow setup made it nearly impossible to get the wires out, mainly for these three reasons:
1. The covers of the original 3 motors were rusted on tightly 2. The motor had to be spun in order to spin off the elbow 3. It was impossible to pull the spaded wires through the elbow
With the covers rusted on in the past, I couldn't disconnect the wires, which meant I couldn't spin off the elbow nor pull the spaded wires through it.
In hindsight, the simpler solution would have been to put a multi-piece straight-through connector on the motor. Luckily, there's nothing stopping me from doing so, except I'm heading off to camp with the kids this weekend.
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wrote:

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be done in just a few minutes. And you should rarely have to do even that, because those pumps last a long time. <<<
Because DDD is doing the thinking & working. He only listens to & follows parts of the great (& free) advice he's given.
He has the most unusual "logic co-processor" I've ever seen employed in A.H.R I used t find it extremely frustrating but now I just see it as funny & sad.
I've decided to only put minimal thought & effort into his threads. Experience has shown they will drag on forever as he substitutes "his brand of logic" of the sound advice he's given. :(
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On Wed, 15 May 2013 11:27:36 -0700, Oren wrote:

Hi Oren,
I went back to find this because DD_BobK said I had ignored your suggestion, so I apologize for not having taken greater note of this.
The location gets torrential rain during the winter (and not a drop of rain for the other 9 months of the year); so, I agree raising it up a bit might be a good idea.
How does it sound to put it on a thick block of wood?
Or is there a better way to raise it off the concrete? (bearing in mind the concrete itself is already raised a couple of inches)
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On Thu, 16 May 2013 09:13:40 -0700, Oren wrote:

I've decided to elevate it an inch or two up on concrete. I'll snap a photo when done to show it to you.
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On Wednesday, May 15, 2013 11:00:24 PM UTC+5:30, Danny D wrote:

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On Wed, 15 May 2013 02:09:51 -0400, gfretwell wrote:

Does that mean that what I measured as the old 1-inch conduit and 1-inch elbow is actually a 3/4-inch conduit and elbow?

If that's the case, why doesn't it then fit the 3/4-inch junction box?
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wrote:

That elbow is a 3/4" flex to 1/2" thread. You need a 3/4 to 3/4
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On Wed, 15 May 2013 14:07:52 -0400, gfretwell wrote:

OK. If the large side of the elbow, which measures at 1-inch, is actually a 3/4 inch connection, then that means the existing conduit is 3/4 inch and not 1 inch as I had thought.
So I bought the wrong box (because I bought a 1-inch box).
However, that doesn't explain why the 3/4-inch threaded connector is still too large for the 3/4-inch box?
It's close, but the threads don't fit?
I'm wholly confused because 3/4 inch conduit doesn't fit the 3/4 inch box???
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What you have doesn't work, so you have to take it back, right? You apparently have 3/4" liquidtight conduit. Measure the inside diameter. Go down to HD or wherever you bought what you have. Take a piece of the conduit with you or measure the inside diatmeter. I see markings on the conduit in the pic and I'll bet it even says what size it is. Find a piece of conduit at HD to use or take a piece with you. Then go to the parts bin and find the appropriate fittings, box, etc. Make sure it all works before you leave.
One fundemental problem that has been explained to you is that you have two different ends of that elbow. One end has threads that mate with the nut for the conduit. That end will never mate with the box. If that conduit is 3/4, then you need a 3/4" elbow. It fits 3/4 conduit on one side, 3/4 box hole on the other
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On Wed, 15 May 2013 15:07:26 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I did exactly as advised, and found out the answer to the size enigma can only be had with experience, as measurements do not prevail when it comes to flexible conduit connection sizes.

It turned out that this fitting (that clearly measured at one inch diameter) isn't even close to what they call a one-inch fitting:

In fact (even though it clearly measures out at 1 inch), it's not even close to what they call a 3/4 inch fitting; it turns out that it is a half-inch fitting!

So, the end result is that the original conduit and both sides of the elbow were actually nominally half inch sizes all along!
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We told you many times right from the start that the size is *not* based on the fitting. It's based on the size of the inside diameter of the CONDUIT.

Well, there you have it.
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On Thu, 16 May 2013 05:34:50 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

And, I erroneously thought all the time that the fitting size was the same as the size of the inside of the conduit.
It wasn't even close.
My mistake.
Lesson learned. (Listen to the huckleberry team!)
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On Thu, 16 May 2013 11:18:04 -0700, Oren wrote:

I did exactly that at Home Depot today, and the guy came up with these nice new two-piece conduit connectors. I also bought extra long lengths of the 10 AWG wire, as recommended, to replace that which I put in yesterday:

Note: I did try to find insulated male & female spade connectors; but they didn't have any for 220 volts and 10 AWG stranded wire; so I'll be using the waterproof wire nuts with di-electric grease instead, on a waterproofed junction box on an extra two inches of concrete to keep it high (although the concrete pad itself is two inches off the ground).
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If the box is waterproof why the need for waterproof wire nuts? If the box was mounted on a post.... it would never get water inside If the box didn't exist...you wouldn't need to mount it or use wire nuts.
Are you learning....your way of doing things makes more work for you & achieves subpar results.
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Doh! We lost that battle early on. Danny had a real hard-on for installing that box. I agree with you and Oren that the box wasn't really necessary. But I think we missed one point in explaining to him why. As I recall, he was complaining about two things with regard to disconnecting and removing a pump motor:
A - Very difficult to get the wires out from the motor. I disagreed with that. Yeah, it's a little tight, but with a pair of needle nose pliers, they should come out without much trouble.
B - He had to rotate the whole motor/pump to unscrew it from the conduit, because the elbow screwed into threads in the motor. I knew what he meant, but didn't think through that there are two piece conduit elbows, where you could remove the CONDUIT from the elbow, pull the wires out of the motor and elbow, then unscrew the elbow. He now has that type connector, actually he got rid of the elbows at the motors all together, so taking it apart at the motor should be no problem. But I don't think we clearly explained those finer points to him.
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On Fri, 17 May 2013 05:26:03 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I do belatedly agree, in hindsight ... I had not realized that the *simpler* (and better) solution would have been to buy the following:
a. Two straight-through multipiece (easily removed) conduit connectors b. About 20 feet of conduit & 12 AWG or 14 AWG stranded copper wire c. Spade and open-end crimp-on connectors d. About 20 feet of bare copper 10 AWG bonding wire & connectors
Instead of: a. Six straight-through multipiece conduit connectors b. 20 feet of conduit & 10 feet of 10 AWG stranded copper wire c. Spade and open-end crimp-on connectors d. About 20 feet of bare copper 10 AWG bonding wire & connectors e. Waterproof junction box and waterproof cover f. Waterproof wire nuts & di-electric grease g. Concrete pedestal
The key to the lesson was to better understand the difference between the absolutely horrid elbow connectors and the lousy one-piece patent-pending straight connectors versus the much easier to remove multi-piece connectors!
That took time and experience. The lessons learned are remembered for the *next* wiring job!
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On Wed, 15 May 2013 15:07:26 -0700, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

It turned out to be even worse than you said.
Apparently the one-piece straight-through half-inch ends that I bought from Home Depot won't work on the motor end because they actually *screw* onto the conduit!

In fact, the Ace Hardware guy was amazed that they weren't two pieces, and he kept trying to take it apart!
His two-piece connector has a nut that holds it onto the conduit, just like the old elbow had.
However, the one-piece Home Depot connector actually, somehow, grabs onto the "ribs" of the conduit, to screw on tightly (patent pending I'm sure).
If I used the one-piece connector on the conduit end by the motor, it would make spinning off that connector impossible without spinning the motor or conduit itself!
And that's the whole problem I'm trying to avoid!
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Must be like my local Ace Hardware where every time I walk in, the resident wingnut who is clueless insists on "helping" me. One visit I was looking for a basic water pressure gauge for a well pump and he gave me a lecture about how residential water systems operate at 2 PSI.
That fitting you have is common. It works fine for most applications. The end that connects to a box, typically goes into a blank hole and then the nut that is provided goes on inside to hold it. As you figured out, that won't work because your motor has a threaded fitting.
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