"We kept Wal-Mart out of our town!"

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On Aug 24, 9:58am, Samantha Hill - remove TRASH to reply

And what is the difference between the procedure in WM and any other store? Well, there is one. WM will take it back no questions asked.
Harry K
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I'm also pretty accomplished at admitting I don't know.
I am afraid that if I DIDN'T know the answer, but made one up and delivered it to the customer, I would get it wrong or someone would overhear my b.s. and call me on it. The worst would be that my wrong information resulted in poor service to the customer.

I try to NOT look stupid, even when I don't have a clue. I'm pretty good at it. <bg>

Agreed. For remedies that requires such detail, opening the box and, often with cameras, reading of the Owner's Manual is required.
I bought my first dSLR camera and THEN learned about the concept of "crop factor" with image sensors smaller than the size of a full frame of 35mm film - the benchmark by which virtually all lens's focal length is determined. It was a BIG deal, wasn't on the outside (or readily available INSIDE) of the box, but I still have (and love) the camera.
It's too bad that most packaging is designed to minimize waste and thwart a shoplifter.
--
:)
JR

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Jim Redelfs wrote:

Wow, you need to come over here and teach seminars to retail people on how to say, "Sorry, I don't have that information," or maybe to the management on why it's better to admit you don't know something rather than look ignorant. There is a horrible dearth of that around here, even when I ask the waffling retail people to their face, "are you trying to say you don't have the answer to that question?" It's like there is some unwritten law in retail around here of "Death before admitting you don't know something."
The other thing that REALLY irks me is if you ask if they carry something and they say, "Did you see it on the shelf?" If I did, I wouldn't be asking. (this, of course, is ludicrously counterbalanced with the question by the cashier, "Did you find everything you were looking for?" One of these days I am going to be able to tell the cashier that I couldn't find something because the person on the floor refused to help, and then I bet heads will roll.) My eyes are not always as good as they used to be, and sometimes a second pair or eyes to find something is helpful, like the nice pharmacist that found the OTC med for me when I told him that I thought it should be located around such-and-such category but I didn't see it.
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That would keep me from asking to open the box.
Jim Redelfs wrote:

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Samantha Hill - remove TRASH to reply wrote:

This is why stores used to have demonstrator models on display- actual plugged-in working units, not empty shells zip-tied to the gondolas.
As to the alarm clocks- don't most have the db ratings listed on the box?
-- aem sends...
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Do any of them have such ratings? Can you name a single example?
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AZ Nomad wrote:

No idea what the (meaningless on made-in-China generic junk) brand name was, but the one in my bedroom now said 85 db on the box, which is why I picked it over the others. (no, I didn't save the box- this was several years ago.) I'm half-deaf in one ear, and needed one I could hear through the pillow if I happened to be sleeping on my good ear. I have found that other than old-style windup alarms, you have to get a 110v line-powered one. None of the battery-powered ones does more than chirp, in my experience.
(Goes and looks) Westclox m/n 124721. But I have seen the same basic clock under other brand names. Their website appears to be dead, so I guess they are now just another zombie brand name used by one of the import-export companies.
-- aem sends...
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On Sun, 24 Aug 2008 15:34:53 -0500, AZ Nomad

And what is the industry-wide measurement standard which would make this information useful?
--
Mark Lloyd
http://notstupid.laughingsquid.com
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wrote:

You aren't aware that sound pressure levels can be measured? Never heard of the decibel unit? However, I know of no alarm clock maker that bothers to do so.
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On Sun, 24 Aug 2008 17:54:09 -0500, AZ Nomad

There's still a lot of missing standards. What standards are used to calibrate the meter? Where do you put the sound-level meter? Under the pillow? 5 inches in front of the clock? What is the "standard test room" like? How quiet is it? How many square feet of curtains? All these and more affect sound level readings. Unless measurements are made under agreed-upon controlled conditions, they're of limited (if any) use.
This lack of standards reminds me of the useless "peak music power" ratings on audio equipment.

BTW, you might know that bels (a decibel is .1 of a bel) are NOT a unit of sound. They're just a way of representing ratios on a logarithmic scale. 0db is an arbitrary point.
--
Mark Lloyd
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In the first example I gave (one of the DTV converters), they did have a display model out. However, it was tied down so as to completely block view of one of the most important parts (the connectors). Without being able to determine if it had a baseband output, it was unsuitable (I DO NOT want the signal degraded by the unnecessary use of RF modulator and tuner).

The ones I've looked at do not. Anyway, it would be meaningless because of lack of measurement standards (is it measured 5 feet away or 5 inches, etc...).
--
Mark Lloyd
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aemeijers wrote:

Not specifically to alarm clocks, but I have too much experience with dB figures for consumer electronics:
1. Products X and Y specify dB at different distances, and too few consumers know how to translate/compare these figures.
2. Product Z specifies dB without specifying what distance.
3. Products sometimes have incorrect/dishonest dB figures.
- Don Klipstein ( snipped-for-privacy@misty.com)
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Jim Redelfs wrote:

How loud the alarm is, for one thing.
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I can assure you the reason for the skylights is savings on the electrical bill. It's not just a 'side effect'. It's the main reason. Natural lighting could hardly increase sales. And it's used equally all across the store, not just the food section.
s
Now they are using more natural light in store -- particularly the grocery section. Why? It increases sales. Side effect -- cuts down on electrical usage.
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In article

This flies in the face of "my" store, built perhaps 7 years ago.
The entire store is pocked with large skylights. During the day, when the sun goes behind a cloud, the ENTIRE store's array of fluorescent lamps fire-up. Moments later, when the sun reappears from behind the cloud, the whole stores-worth of fluorescents switch off. This folly goes on EVERY day.
This is INCREDIBLY annoying when working in the photo department, trying to color-correct images and do other visual work. I suspect the effect is as distracting while trying to color-match paint or select fabric for a sewing project.
Given the CO$T of incorporating the skylights into initial construction, the ongoing thermal loss during heating and cooling and the wear-and-tear on the light fixtures themselves, Walmart isn't saving a damned dime. It's all "feel good" green effort for show.
As for the produce department: It's the only part of the store with always-on quartz lamps shining on the product. You tell me...
--
:)
JR

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In article

I am skeptical of "a bundle". In fact, I doubt there is any NET savings, given the considerations I previously listed.

Let's just say the lights switch on and off frequently enough that, when working in the store, it is annoying.
I do, however, acknowledge that natural light is physically and emotionally beneficial. Regardless, I'll have to get used to the "light show" on partly cloudy days.
--
:)
JR

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On Fri, 22 Aug 2008 17:57:36 -0500, Jim Redelfs

They could adjust the thresholds for the automatic light controls, to lengthen the on-off cycles.
--
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the
Missed the original thread, but catch the drift. It's amazing that America created the society and economic environment that generated the Wal-Mart phenomena, and now mostly detests it.
Sure, I want dirt cheap endless consumer goods, just not in *my* neighborhood.
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Was a big fight trying to keep a supercenter out of Pullman, Wa - went on for a couple years. People screaming "I won't shop there" but were the same ones who would be seen in the check-out line of a WM just 7 miles down the road in Moscow Id.
Don't know what the current status is. Last I heard last year was that all permits were finally approved and the last lawsuit was pitched out of court.
Harry K
Harry K
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On Thu, 21 Aug 2008 19:00:13 -0700 (PDT), Harry K

A How do you know they were the same ones?
B If one person opposed shopped in Moscow, how do you know how many others did?
c Did they say they would shop at any WM or that they wouldn't shop at this one, because they resented it being in their town.
D If they said they wouldn't shop there, does that mean they can't change their mind later?
E If they said they wouldn't shop there and they were bluffing, is that so bad? Don't many people bluff for many reasons? Is it always bad? Because it is lying?
F Again, how do you know that the ones who said they wouldn't shop there are the same ones who shop in Moscow? How many faces could you possibly recognize?

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