WD-40 & Silicone Spray. When is one better over the other?

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I have squeaking front and garage entrance door hinges in my house I need to spray with lubrication during the winter because it gets so loud. I used WD-40 a couple of times, but the irritating noise would come back only after a few days.
Someone told me to give silicone spray a try, so I might do that, but thought I'd pose a question in here to learn when using one over the other is better.
Is metal on metal contact for WD-40 and the silicone spray for everything else? Please clarify. Thanks!
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wrote:

WD-40 is not a lubricant. Silicone spray is excellent except you will have great difficulty painting anything that has silicone residue on it.
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WD-40 is essentially kerosene and a carrier/spray. Nice for cleaning metal, loosening things up, etc., like a penetrating oil, but NO long-term lubricant properties. For garage doors, etc., I use an SAE-80 gear oil, as it doesn't run as much, and pretty well stays where I put it. The silicon lubricants are generally waterproof, but as the last poster points out, they mess up the surface for painting, unless very throughly cleaned. I use WD-40 for cleaning, but NOT lubricating firearms, cleaning the rims of my bicycle wheels, and stuff like that. I find that a pump oiler full of ordinary 10W30 motor oil really meets the majority of lubricating needs around the house, plus the SAE-80 gear oil for stuff like the garage door pivots and the bearings on the push lawnmower. A small grease gun is likewise handy to have around.
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wrote:

Good Stuff Paul!
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WD-40 says "lubricates" on the can.
Gunk and similar brands of "silicone" spray are just WD-40 with a few drops of silicone oil for laughs. Odd that you think it is "excellent" but WD-40 is not.
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On Wed, 04 Oct 2006 22:59:21 -0500, Richard J Kinch

Silicone is just for laughs? Water can be a lubricant also but I doubt it would be your first choice.
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Richard J Kinch wrote:

Who told you this? They were having fun at your expense.
WD40 is mostly kerosene. There is NO kerosene in any of the major brands of silicone spray. WD40 and silicone spray are completely different chemical formulations.
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Ether Jones writes:

Nope. Read the Gunk brand can or MSDS linked in my earlier posts. Gunk "silicone" spray is 99 percent petroleum, roughly kerosene weight, with a tiny bit of silicone oil.
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Maybe *you* should read it before you post further on this topic. I did, and posted what I found. The contents are not what you claim they are.

The MSDS you linked is more than ten years old, and is not from the manufacturer. Here's a recent (21 Mar 2005) MSDS from the manufacturer:
http://www.gunk.com/msds/AM914_6.PDF

Wrong on all counts.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller writes:

Sorry, but that's what's on the can on my shelf.
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Either the can you have is as old as the MDSD you posted the link to, or you need to look at the can again. The composition of the stuff now simply is not what you say it is.
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Doug Miller writes:

Sez you. Reality doesn't correspond to your petulant annoyance.
Here are Gunk MSDSs from 2005 or 2006:
http://www.gunk.com/msds/M914.PDF http://www.gunk.com/msds/M914_6.PDF http://www.gunk.com/msds/M949.PDF http://www.gunk.com/msds/AM914_6.PDF
Looks like they may have upped the silicone from 1-2 percent to 6-7 percent. Still 93 percent petroleum/propellant/surfactant, like WD-40.
It is: paint thinner with a little silicone added.
It is not: silicone spray in the sense of a spray made of silicone.
Kind of like calling Mountain Dew "fruit juice" because it has some fruit flavoring.
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Yes, "sez me." The reality is exactly as I said: the stuff just isn't what you say it is.

Yes, I know, I read them. I posted that last one, remember?

Take a look at the MSDS for WD-40. Compare the two.
Gunk Silicone Spray Lubricant #AM914 is, according to the MSDS: aliphatic solvent naphtha 15 to 40% butane 10 to 30 % dimethyl polysiloxane 1 to 5% propane 1 to 5%
WD40 is, according to the MSDS, Aliphatic Petroleum Distillates 45-50% Petroleum Base Oil 15-25% LVP Hydrocarbon Fluid 12-18% Carbon Dioxide 2-3%

It is not.
From the MSDS for Parks paint thinner (a brand widely sold at home centers): Stoddard Solvent (percentage not given) 1,2,4-trimethyl benzene (percentage not given)
http://www.newparks.com/PDF/MSDS/SOLVENTS/PaintThinner . pdf#search=%22parks%20%22paint%20thinner%22%20msds%22

Straw man -- nobody ever claimed that it was.

And now I suppose you're going to argue with Sherwin-Williams for calling their products "latex paint" when they're mostly water?
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller writes:

OK, your analysis is, Stoddard solvent is not an aliphatic petroleum distillate. Let's leave it at that.
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It's not.
You might want to Google on "Stoddard solvent" to find out what it really is, since you appear to be totally ignorant of its composition. It *contains* aliphatic petroleum distillates, but its composition is more than half NON-aliphatic.
Now stop, before you make yourself look even sillier than you already have.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller writes:

My total ignorance cannot possibly win against such diligent Googling. I eagerly await your rewrite of organic chemistry.
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*I* didn't need to use Google to know that Stoddard solvent isn't an "aliphatic petroleum distillate". I suggested Google because I figured it was the easiest way for *you* to learn what it is, as it appears rather unlikely, on the basis of this and earlier posts, that your household includes any chemistry textbooks.

In other words... you really *don't* know what it is, and refuse to learn. :-)
Let's summarize here, shall we?
You claimed that Gunk Silicone Spray Lubricant is basically nothing more than WD-40 with a few drops of silicone added.
Wrong, as I demonstrated by posting the composition of each.
You also claimed that it's basically nothing more than paint thinner with a little bit of silicone.
Wrong again, as I demonstrated by posting the composition of a common brand of paint thinner.
Your basis for those claims is the fact that the principal ingredient in all three is petroleum distillate; you seem to be under the impression that this is a single compound, rather than a generic term that encompasses thousands (if not millions) of widely different compounds that often have nothing more in common than their origin in petroleum.
Then you suggest that I'm trying to rewrite organic chemistry!!
I'd also like to remind the readers, if there are any left at this point, that Richard has in the past claimed that gasoline is safe to drink, and carbon monoxide is safe to breathe -- but common household borax is a deadly poison.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Your "demonstrations" consist of finding differences in ingredients and nomenclature.
Doug Miller writes:

What a sad and pathetic attitude you have.
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That was kind of the point, you know -- that having different ingredients means they're NOT THE SAME. I'm not sure why that's difficult for you.
As for "differences in ... nomenclature", do you seriously contend that Stoddard solvent and the aliphatic solvent naphtha which is the principal constituent of Gunk Silicone Spray Lube are merely the same thing under different names?
If so ... I'd love to see the explanation of *that*.
If not ... please clarify what you meant.

What a sad and pathetic "understanding" of chemistry *you* have. And you *have* made those claims.
As for my "attitude", I find it entertaining to puncture pretentious gasbags and watch them sputter. Thank you for being a continuing source of amusement, not only to myself but to others as well.
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Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
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Doug Miller writes:

That explains a lot. You take pride and pleasure in the humiliation of others. Gasbags you deem fair game, unworthy of civility. You are profoundly lonely, such a skunky personality being repulsive, except to other skunks.
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