WD-40 & Silicone Spray. When is one better over the other?


Congrats on the best answer of them all.... But I've even used plain marine grease, and it works well also. I think maybe his hinges are captive pin, negating our answers.
WD40 "toolbox in a can"? I don't think so.....

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 5 Oct 2006 08:40:29 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@webtv.net wrote:

The only anit-seize I know is for keeping soldering iron tips from sticking to the soldering iron, and maybe to keep sparkplugs from sticking in their sockets. Etc. Thing related to heat.
Is that what you use or is there something else I don't konw about?

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is what you want. Regular White lithium grease (tube/spray) is fine also.
Don't buy it at Amazon, it's at any hardware store, Home Depot, Lowe's, etc.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
-zero
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

I use WD-40 for cleaning. That's all.
I use silicon for applying a fine layer of lube over a larger area.
As for garage door hinges, and pins, a few drops of light machinery oil lubes and adhearse to the surfaces I want to keep lubed.
This is me, I generally give my garage door a yearly cleaning and lubing.
imho,
tom @ www.MyFastCoolCars.com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Tom The Great wrote:

silicon and silicone are two completely different things.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Ah thx, for the spelling assist. :D
tom
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Holy Crikey wrote:

Use a petrol-based machine oil, like bike lube. Don't use 3-in-1, since it's a vegetable-based oil and oxidizes into varnish.
White lithium grease is better than oil.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

??? You're kidding, right?
CWM
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Charlie Morgan wrote:

Not according to the several bike repair manuals I've read. Oils come in two flavors, drying and non-drying. Drying types, made from plants, are what varnishes are made from, with the addition of resins to add body.
The current best lubricating oils are made from Pennsylvania crude. The previous best was spermacetti, from whales, which you rightfully can't get anymore.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Wow. So many errors in just two paragraphs.
First off, *no* oil "oxidizes into varnish". Varnish, as you said, contains resin. The oxidation process doesn't magically cause resin to appear if it wasn't there before.
Second, varnish isn't just oil plus resin: it needs a solvent or vehicle as well.
Third, you imply that all vegetable oils are drying oils, when in fact many, if not most, vegetable oils are non-drying.
Finally, the claim that 3-in-1 oil is "vegetable-based" is simply absurd, and is, I suspect, what triggered the "??? You're kidding, right?" remark. Just look at the label on a can of it: "Contains petroleum distillates." Or read the MSDS here: http://www.wd40.com/Brands/pdfs/msds-3in1_multipurpose.us.pdf
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

"Varnish," meaning a dried coating of gunk that jams up fine, precision
machinery, like Sturmey-Archer 5-speed hubs. Not "varnish" enough that I'd use it to refinish a piano.

Linseed, tung, etc.

Not according to the bike manuals.

If so, I'll gladly reconsider.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Varnish has two meanings, and, yes, that's one of them -- but you were *clearly* using the other meaning when you described varnish as a blend of oil and resin.

Yes, some *are* drying oils, as I clearly acknowledged -- but most are not, e.g. corn, soybean, canola, etc.

Then your bike manuals are wrong. Which do you suppose is a better source for the composition of 3-in-1 oil, some bike manual, or the manufacturer of 3-in-1 oil?

Don't just take my word for it -- go to wd40.com and read the MSDS for yourself. Go to a hardware store and read the label on the can. 3-in-1 oil is a petroleum oil. It is NOT vegetable-based.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller writes:

Of your examples, only canola is non-drying.
Corn (maize), soybean, safflower, sunflower, and some other vegetable oils are semi-drying and do find use in paints. This is why they get gummy on the outside of the bottle.
Drying vs non-drying is not a neat distinction. All of the above consist of the same 5 fatty acids, just in different proportions. Two of those five fatty acids are polyunsaturated and contribute drying properties. Raw linseed oil typically contains 30 percent non-drying fatty acids: palmitic, stearic, and oleic. Same constituents as found in beef or pork fat.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I didn't say that any of them were non-drying -- I said they are not drying, which encompasses non-drying *and* semi-drying. As you say...

I was responding to a post that implied that "vegetable oil" and "drying oil" were equivalent, which is absolutely not the case.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

Or the mechanic who has to rebuild a hub after it's been gunked up by 3-in-1.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

I'm not debating whether 3-in-1 is, or is not, an appropriate product for lubricating a bicycle -- I'm just saying that it's NOT a vegetable oil. The ingredients statement on the product package says it's petroleum. The manufacturer's MSDS says it's petroleum.
You have a bike manual that says it's vegetable.
Your bike manual is wrong.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Doug Miller wrote:

I have a bike manual that says it gums up freehubs.

I've taken down freehubs and seen the claimed effect for myself.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Father Haskell wrote:

You said in an earlier post that you had a bike manual that said 3-in-1 oil is vegetable-based. That claim is what Doug is contesting.

When Doug wrote "Your bike manual is wrong", he was referring to your claim that the bike manual said 3-in-1 oil is vegetable-based. He took no position on whether or not it gunks up hubs.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Ether Jones wrote:

Doesn't much matter what it's made of. It fouls up delicate machinery. Italian bike component manufacturer Campagnolo claims that their tolerances and finish exceed aerospace grade. Read that as saying bike shops are probably the best place to buy lubricating oils.
3-in-1 is good for door hinges. Good also for jamming locks with less risk of raising suspicion than super glue.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

The original post asked what lubricant to use on a door hinge!! What it may do to delicate machinery is completely irrelevant to this discussion.
And it's *not* vegetable oil, no matter what your bike manual says.
--
Regards,
Doug Miller (alphageek at milmac dot com)
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.