Rotting Window Frames

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On Tue, 17 Nov 2009 10:11:15 -0500, "EXT"

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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

They are made by "Feldmann", built somewhere near London, Ontario. Very good windows, except for some poor wood in them, however the company folded during the last recession in the late '80s or early '90s.
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I use a belt sander and usualy 80g , cleans it fast
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Peter H wrote:

Yes, there are epoxies for that purpose; as mentioned, Git Rot is one.
The success in using them depends on the extent and type of rot; the epoxy needs to penetrate into the entire rotted area. If the rot is "wet" rot and superficial they would work IF the wood is completely dried first. If the rot is deep "dry" rot, you would need to drill numerous holes and fill them with epoxy...all the fungus causing the rot needs to be encapsulated. In either case, any missing wood can be replaced with Bondo after the epoxy sets.
How practical it is to do that is impossible to say without knowning the extent of the rot. Quite possibly it would be cheaper to replace the windows considering the amount of work to fix them, prime and paint. Especially if the rot is also in the overhead member of the frame...try getting thin epoxy into *that* :)
--

dadiOH
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On Mon, 16 Nov 2009 18:58:48 -0800 (PST), Peter H
-snip-

first you need to find out why they only lasted 22 years. Once that's fixed, I love this stuff; http://www.rotdoctor.com /
It is expensive, and not that easy to use-- but given all the things that replacing otherwise good windows entails, it is probably a good idea.
I fixed the bottom of my garage door with it 10[?] years ago & there is no sign of rot returning.
Jim
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That stuff is just epoxy thinned and marked up a couple 100%. Get ordinary epoxy and after mixing it, thin with alcohol. You can add up to 10% alcohol without affecting the results.
Lowes and Home depot sell brick molding and window sash. It's not that hard to cut out the bad parts and replace them on most windows. Unless the rot has gone way in.
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1. The home inspector could have answered your questions about repair rather than replacement. Rot signals damage by moisture, and long-term repair requires eliminating the source of this damage. Plastic and metal-covered windowframes are much easier to clean and maintain than (cheaper) wood.
2. You should be aware of the government-subsidized "Eco- Energy" programme for Ontario, see http://www.homeperformance.com/energy-advisor-home-eco-energy-advisors-ontario-bc-canada
This subsidizes ($150) an "energy audit" of your house (cost $300 to $450) and provides for part payment of upgrades that improve your energy economy. The federal government announced in 2008 (as an economic incentive) extra tax deductions for home improvements, but this has not yet been enacted for tax year 2009.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
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Peter H wrote:

A carpenter can cut out rotted sections and replace with new lumber, blend and paint.
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Peter-
I have done extensive epoxy repair on my 1930's home in SoCal. A fair number of the the sills (redwood) & sash frames (missing glazing compound) were neglected for quite awhile before I got to them.
The redwood sills were badly weathered & eroded but no rot (clear old growth heart wood). Only one sash (both lower corners were "gone") was rotted. None of the window framing was rotted.
The suggestions about using epoxy products are good ones. I used (1987) Bondo on two window sills (redwood) with VERY POOR results. A call to Bono's tech support line got the following response "while we recommend the use of Bondo for wood repair, we don't recommend its use on redwood".
I switched to www.abatron.com wood repair products; LiquidWood & WoodEpox. The stuff ain't cheap but it really works & really lasts! Repairs that I did in 1987 just need to be sanded & repainted. East facing sills especially.
I was burned so badly by my Bondo experience and the epoxy I used preformed so well. I never gave any Bondo products another shot at exterior wood repair on any of my work. Luckily it only screwed up two window sills.
In the latest "go 'round' (2006) I rebuilt the lower corners of a rotted window sash. I embedded SS all thread (www.mcmaster.com) in the sound wood, jigged up the sash and rebuilt the corners. Like icing a cake. When cured, I shaped & sanded it. Perfect result.
BUT if I had had a number of sashes to do, I might have set up & done a a wood repair or just bought or built new sashes. For a single sash it "may" have made sense to do the epoxy repair.
that's all about the repair side....but why do you have the rot? Paint failure? Water intrusion? Bad window material?
My sashes are nearly 80 years old...yellow pine? maybe? The only rot I've experienced is due to my lack of proper maint but SoCal aint Toronto.
Per other posts.....window / sill repair via epoxies is a LOT of work.
I learned my lesson.....keep windows & sills properly painted. At the first sign of paint film failure, sand them & give them a another coat. Paint needs to be sound to protect the wood.
cheers Bob
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I'd like to thank all who replied. I'm not sure why the windows rotted, but suspect that they just didn't keep up the painting. Eventually the wood weathered and split, letting moistur in. I'm not in the house yet. We take possession next month and December in the Greater Toronto Area is not prime time to be up on the side of a house working on your windows, but I'll be up there in the spring.
Epoxy seems like the way to go. I'll spend some time at Home Depot and see what they have there.
Peter H
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