Reinforced (door) strike plates

Little brick bungalow in a midwest US city. Quikset door locks.
When I moved in 25+ years ago, everybody had just knob-set locks on their doors. Burglars got more active, folks added deadbolts, mostly with the little Mickey-Mouse screws holding lite strike plates. Thats what I got now.
Burglars keep getting worse and worse, just kicking in rear doors. I need to reinforce my locks.
I got front and rear doors, each with a knob-set and a deadbolt. Old lite strike plates are about 2 1/4 " long. There is about 1 1/2 " between the plates on the rear door, about 3" betwixt on the front.
I figure I'd be reasonably secure if I could get, say, a single very heavy duty strike plate to handle both locks on each door using 6 or 8 3.5" screws driven into the 2 2x4's in the door frame.
I checked Lowes and HD online, stopped by 1 hardware store, called a locksmith. Doesn't look like they have anything like what I need (the usual case).
Any ideas? Whats the best I could do for, say, $20-40 per door, installing myself?
Thx, Will
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wrote:

To be secure you really have to reinforce both sides - the door and the jamb. There's also the visual deterent. Your door will look tougher to get into so they'll be less likely to try and go for an easier target.
Check Amazon for: Security Strike, Brushed Nickel 6"H x 1-1/8"W by Mintcraft $8.32 Door Reinforcer, 4" x 4 1/2" Brushed Nickel by Mintcraft $7.79 Door Reinforcer, 4" x 9" Brushed Nickel by Mintcraft $9.76
Please note I came in right in the middle of your budget range at around $30. I expect extra points when you do your grading. ;)
R
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wrote:

To be secure you really have to reinforce both sides - the door and the jamb. There's also the visual deterent. Your door will look tougher to get into so they'll be less likely to try and go for an easier target.
Check Amazon for: Security Strike, Brushed Nickel 6"H x 1-1/8"W by Mintcraft $8.32 Door Reinforcer, 4" x 4 1/2" Brushed Nickel by Mintcraft $7.79 Door Reinforcer, 4" x 9" Brushed Nickel by Mintcraft $9.76
Please note I came in right in the middle of your budget range at around $30. I expect extra points when you do your grading. ;)
R
I have seen a door kicked in twice and even the cheapest Kwicksets held while the wood frame split. I used a 6' x 1/2" x 1/2" x 1/8" piece of angle iron screwed in behind the molding with 3 1/2" deck screws. some grinding around the strike plate was required. Add another 12 or so screws around the perimeter if the door frame wasn't screwed in real well the first time. Add small steel plates sandwiched around the locks if the door is not strong enough.
It took me about 3 hrs but the next guys really gonna work up a sweat kicking his way in. Cost about $15 per door.
If you don't mind the ghetto look put an extra deadbolt down low that says go away and try the neighbors.
--
They can have my command prompt when they pry it from my cold dead fingers.


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spend money on the strike plate f you want.........
but get a deadbolt with a LONG arm that goes not only in the sstrike plate but into the framing...
this will slow them down a lot. but remember they may just look for another way:(
a yappy dog can do wonders to discourage intruders, so can a alarm system or just signs warning of alarm system........
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Well, I tend to agree re visuals.

This stuff might work OK on the front door ...

Not until the assignment is finished. The Strike, Brushed Nickel 6"H will not clear the strike on the knob-set on the rear door, hence cannot be used there. Eh?
Thx, Will
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wrote:

Longer screws on the deadbolt lock plate are the fastest and cheapest solution.
At some point it's not worth it since a couple of crowbars will probably open any of your windows. Just slip one under each side and pry up. The window latches will pull out.
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In typed:

That's good for the strike plates it would appear. But don't forget the door itself; is it hearty enough to withstand a good hit? How about the hinges? How about the door frame all the way aroun d?
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On 8/18/2011 12:55 PM, Twayne wrote:

Strike plates won't help with a typical thin-jambed wood front door from that era. A solid kick will shatter the door where it is drilled out for the knob and deadbolt. Unless there is a charming old wood door the house would look wrong without, just buy a quality steel-clad prehung door and install it, and be done with it. Make sure it is installed and shimmed and insulated properly. Another advantage- unless you want the ability to have the door open for air on those few balmy spring and fall days, you can deep-six the entire storm door. The heat savings alone will pay for the door in a few years.
--
aem sends...

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Wilfred Xavier Pickles wrote:

Don't know about your particular geometry, but here are a couple of associated, low-cost, tips:
1. Modest computer skills - and browsing through Google Images - can yield a "Protected by Blackwater Alarm System" or similar which can be printed on a transparent label and stuck on your windows and such.
2. 12-gauge shells are about two for a dollar.
3. Motion sensitive lights or motion sensitive recorded dog barks might help.
4. You might look into how reactive armor works. As I understand, when a projectile (boot) strikes the reactive armor, the armor explodes violently destroying the projectile (foot).
5. There are door reinforcement mechanisms that range from a simple drop bar to a bar that drops down from the door diagonally into a floor anchor. Some apartment dwellers in New York use a mechanism similar to one found on a safe; turn the handle and pins extend to all four sides of the door (probably more than $30, though).
6. Remove one screw from each hinge and replace with a nail that extends past the hinge about 1". Cut the head off the nail and drill a hole on the other hinge's face to correspond with the nail. When the door closes, this resulting metal rod enters the hole and strengthens the hinge side of the door. This is a modest way of protecting a door with outside-accessible hinges.
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On Aug 18, 9:02am, "Stormin Mormon"

That's the most important thing, long screws that will reach into the framing. don't forget to replace a couple of the screws in at least the top and bottom hinge as well. You should predrill the holes to prevent splitting.
If you want something that gives a more imposing appearance, there's also metal plates that wrap around the door in the area of the deadbolt. But really making sure that the strike plates and hinges are anchored to the framing is Step One in upgrading your security.
good luck
nate
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