Puck lighting

If you have them, do you like them? Do you have any recommendations, such as LED, dimmer switch, brand?
Thanks
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You might think about led strip lighting. I'm going to work on mine. Bought long 30 foot strip, which can be devided in sets of 3 . Also got dimmer control. More work putting it all together. They are bright and I got warm white. Many LEDs have a sky or bluish tint, not mine.
Greg
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wrote:

hot, use a lot of power, and are expensive to replace (many of those bulbs are over $8 each for Xenogen 5 watt bulbs) and do not last long. Get "warm white" - dimmable are nice as you can adjust the light level to what you want, instead of guessing how much light you might want before purchace, and finding they are either too bright or too dim.
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responding to http://www.homeownershub.com/maintenance/puck-lighting-698763-.htm DA wrote:

When you say "puck", do you literally mean round flat light fixtures? This particular type seems to be prone to overheating, at least those products that are 120V powered and LED ones were especially bad in terms of manufacturing quality. Horror stories about those puck LED lights abound ( http://elabz.com/repairing-lights-of-america-7200led-bn-led-lights/ is one or search for "Lights Of America" for more ), at least a couple of years ago. Even their CFL counterparts seem to be having similar issues, most likely due to overheating. I have both LED and CFL pucks and neither lasts as long as their different design counterparts do. The shape must be messing up with efficient heat dissipation or some other such inherent problem with design.
Anyhow, I think if you really wanted to recess the lights or otherwise hide them from view, use low voltage versions (12V, 24V) because the position of the lights will make them simmer in the waste heat of the voltage conversion from 120V and they won't last long. Low voltage ones might still be warmer than necessary but at least there will be fewer sources of that heat.
------------------------------------- /_/ ((@v@)) NIGHT ():::() OWL VV-VV
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On Sat, 26 May 2012 16:58:51 +0000, DA

ANY LOA product seams to have about the same reputation.

Low voltage LED lights - of current technology, run cool and are quite long-lived.

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PUCK YOU
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