Paint - still with the 'brush strokes' !!

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On Saturday, August 24, 2013 12:36:22 PM UTC-4, dadiOH wrote:

+1
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On 8/23/2013 10:32 AM, RobertMacy wrote:

That may be PART of your problem. I wonder where/how you stored what was left of the original paint...garage, very high temp?

That is plain crazy....no modern paint is supposed to run like low-fat milk. Most are like thick cream. It is beginning to seem that you haven't the faintest idea what the label says or why it says what it does.
If you are painting plain, flat interior drywall, I think it would be best to sand the wall with fine sandpaper and start over with fresh paint from a good brand paint store. The nonsense of drying in 10 sec. or being so runny is just ridiculous.

Paint ALWAYS needs stirring....perhaps the reason you got no brush marks from that paint is that you used the thinner, upper part of the liquid and left the heavy solids in the bottom
I would not bother painting unless I used quality (yes, expensive) paint, roller and/or brush. Good brushes are expensive, but with proper care will last a lifetime. That said, it takes time and practice to gain skill at painting...most of the paint companies have all kinds of tips for choosing product, clear instructions for use, and skill-building advice. A good paint store can also advise what additives are useful or beneficial...a business with experience knows what the sell and how to use it best. Good luck!

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On Friday, August 23, 2013 7:30:25 PM UTC-4, NorMinn wrote:

I agree about the thickness. I haven't done any painting in quite a while and last year painted a couple of rooms with Benjamin Moore. It was thicker than I remember other paints being from 15 years ago, but it was by far the best performing paint I've ever used. No brush strokes where cutting in, no back spatter from the roller, beautiful finish, right out of the can.
At the same time, I just had the fast drying experience that the OP is talking about. That was with Zinnser oil based stain killer. It was drying so fast, I was having a hard time getting the brush strokes out. First I thought it was because it was going on areas that had been repaired, covered with mud. But it performed pretty much the same on the areas that were previously painted.
If I has something to thin it with, I would have done so, but I wanted to get through the job, so I toughed it out. Still, as it dried it did pretty much level itself out, but next time if I need that type of product, I would choose a different brand. But again that was with a stain killer, so they may be thicker and have different properties than a regular latex paint.
If the paint is drying as fast as he says, I think the advice to take it together with some materials to the store and show them what it's doing is good advice. And I'd be choosing a different brand of paint next time.

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On 8/24/2013 1:03 PM, snipped-for-privacy@optonline.net wrote:

I normally use BM, but got some Sherwin Williams exterior alkyd semi when I stripped and painted exterior trim on my daughter's house. That paint was like pancake batter, it was so thick, but it went on, spread, levelled like a dream!

I think Zinsser has a water-based stain blocker, don't they? I know the shellac based primer dries pretty fast, but I had to sand that project anyway. Zinsser, I think, might be the oldest of the reliable stain-blockers, but I would use any of the good brands if they make a stain-blocker....the labels are pretty reliable.
I used Zinsser water-based (IIRC) on dark walnut-colored Formica bathroom cabinet....if it didn't work, I would have ripped it out. Worked fine, with semi alkyd over the primer after repairing the powdered particle-board doors that had gotten wet. Moisture would seep between the two Formica surfaces and pop the particle-board. Same thing with an old kitchen cabinet...I now smear a touch of silicone caulk into the seams of Formica on my counter to keep unnoticed puddles from getting down to the p.b.

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wrote:

And I paint all cut edges of particle board or MDF that might possibly see water. Paint ALL sink cutouts and ALL kitchen counter hidden edges.
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Any chance that you are doing EXTERIOR painting (in the sun, for example), and not INTERIOR painting?
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On Thu, 22 Aug 2013 07:30:21 -0700, RobertMacy

That's not "high quality paint." It's junk. Even with a junk brush, decent paint will self-level. Didn't you post before about some paint that wouldn't dry? If that was you, maybe you should hire somebody to buy your paint and do your painting. Anyway, here's a few tips for everybody who's running into junk paint. Buy a quart - or pint if available - and try it out before you pay up for gallons. There's garbage paint out there. If paint doesn't brush or roll well, thin it. Be careful, and thin it very little at a time. If you overthin - it's now junk. And don't use old paint. Buy it when you'll use it, and throw away whatever's left over. Whether oil or latex, only put what you'll use in one work session into the work container, and keep the rest sealed in the can. As soon as your brush becomes saturated near the handle, dirty, or stiffens anywhere, stop. Clean your gear. Same with rollers, but different. If they skip on the surface, or don't leave a smooth, self-leveling surface, something's wrong. Stop and figure out what's wrong.
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wrote:

Don't know if that was this OP or not but AFAIR the flaws were lap marks. Not all that long ago.
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dadiOH
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