OT: Do You Put Grease On Your Brake Caliper Bracket?

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On Fri, 17 Jun 2016 20:49:53 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

http://www.mcratracing.com/wheel_bearing.html calls the "bracket" a caliper frame. in step 4. http://installuniversity.com/mb/w203/w203/amg-brake.html Caliper frame in step 10 - Mercedes calls it a frame. http://eco-hondacar.blogspot.ca/2015/05/rotor-wear-thickness-and-dimension.html Look at step2. and step 3 calls it a caliper frame on a Honda.
https://www.amazon.ca/ADVICS-AD1211-Ultra-Premium-Front-Brake/dp/B00CYGWMEU says "I was told that these Advics brake pads were the OEM type used on my 2008 RAV4. Since it was time to replace my front pads, and the OEM had lasted a long time without coating my alloy rims with ugly brake dust, I figured I would try the Advics pads even though I had never heard of them before. Well guess what? When I removed my factory Toyota pads and pried off the shims, there was the name Advics stamped on the pad. And the brake caliper frame had the Advics name cast into it as well. These pads are absolutely the same as the OEM pads the Toyota dealer would love to sell you for a lot more money. Also, the dealer charges extra for the anti-squeal shims which are included with these pads. So far after almost 2000 city miles, these pads are just as sure stopping and quiet as the factory pads were. I'm confident they will last just as long"
He calls it a "caliper frame" on a Toyota.
http://www.ehow.com/how_7472501_change-alero-rear-brake-pads.html On an Olds Alero - Install the brake pads onto the caliper brackets. Apply silicone grease to the caliper bolts. Install the brake caliper onto the caliper frame. Install the bolts in the brake caliper and tighten them. Remove the wheel nuts from the brake rotor. Install the wheel and tire assembly using the reference mark to make certain that it is in the same position, and tighten the wheel nuts.
It refers to both bracket and frame.
So I'm not the only one - and it's not JUST Canadian.......
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On 06/17/2016 10:27 PM, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

I jsut happen to have the service manual for a V-Strom up -- they refer to it as a 'caliper holder'.
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snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca posted for all of us...

So what would you know? <g>
--
Tekkie

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"Tekkie®" wrote in message posted for all of us...

So what would you know? <g>
--
Tekkie

You can put the grease on many different places "However"
  Click to see the full signature.
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On Monday, June 20, 2016 at 6:33:54 PM UTC-4, Tony944 wrote:

What would a person be able to grease such that the "centrifugal force of Rotation" would throw grease on the rotor, except perhaps the wheel itself?
What other part of a disk brake system is "rotating" other than the wheel and the rotor?
Are you talking about using so much grease on a stationary part of the brak e system that it *drips* onto the wheel then gets thrown onto the rotor?
Please explain.
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The caliper frame/bracket/torque plate / whatreveryouwanttocallit doesn't rotate unless you flip the car end over end, and it would be a spectacular flip to produce enough centr force to fling the grease - and it would throw it AWAY from the rotor.
The bif thing is not to use enough grease for it to run off and get onto the pads. Like the old Brylkreme ? commercial - "a little dab'll do ya"
More than a smudge is a waste.
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On Fri, 17 Jun 2016 20:49:53 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Just about every "how tro" about disk brakes refers to the "caliper frame"
http://www.sevenoffroad.com/showthread.php?427-Dana-30-44-Unit-Bearing-Replacement •Using a 21mm wrench, loosen and remove the two 21mm bolts holding the brake caliper frame to the knuckle. With the bolts removed, slide the entire brake caliper/frame assembly aft off of the rotor. Use a bungee cord or spare wire to tire up the brake caliper out of the way. Be sure to not allow the caliper to drop and be held in place by the brake line as this could tear/rupture the brake line.
https://autopartsdirecttoyou.wordpress.com/category/by-task/wheel-hub-bearing-replacement/ In order to remove the hub nut, you will need to either have someone apply the brakes or do as I did and jam a socket extension into the rotor vents and let it jam against the caliper frame to keep the axle from turning while you remove the hub nut. This 1-11/16? (corrected) nut is torqued on at 175 lb-ft so it will take a bit to get it off. I had to buy a 3/4? drive socket set ($42 from Harbor Freight… hey I only need it a few times) in order to remove it.
http://www.ranger-forums.com/engine-drivetrain-122/how-replace-front-abs-wheel-speed-sensor-117573/ . Remove the two bolts holding the brake caliper frame on, not the caliper pins, but the bolts holding the caliper frame. They are 15mm bolts that are access on the back side of the caliper frame
http://www.phaysis.com/2014/02/ I pulled into a parking lot, lifted the car, and removed the tire. What I found was a scored brake rotor and a little stamped metal clip that was getting pinched between the brake caliper frame and the rotor. This is, as you can expect, not supposed to happen. So I limped out of there, picked up a new pair of clips, installed them at home, and took another test drive. It was still grinding, so the new clips got damaged as well. Something was drastically wrong with the wheel.
Volvo refers to "Brake Caliper Frame-To-Wheel Spindle Bolt" in the mitchell repair manual for Volvo V70 XC 1999-2000 front suspension repair section (www.matthewsvolvosite.com/forums/download/file.php?idP33)
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On Saturday, June 18, 2016 at 12:49:54 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

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re: Just about every "how tro" about disk brakes refers to the "caliper frame"
Granted, just about every how-to *you* posted referred to them as a "calipe r frame", but I'm pretty sure that I could find just as many, and probably more, that call it a bracket. OK, it has 2 names, I'll give you that.
I still find it interesting that I have been unable to find a "frame" on an y of the 4 or 5 different parts sites that I looked at. Were you about to fin d a part number or part description for the "frame" on your Ranger? Or a part number for a "frame" for any other model car?
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On Fri, 17 Jun 2016 22:06:59 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

I've just posted half a dozen different names for the part from different manufacturer's sites. and NONE of them called it a "bracket". There are likely some that do.
Just saying, inalmost 30 years doing it for a living, and another 20 doing it as a hobby "I" have referred to it as a caliper frame, and so have the parts men and other mechanics I've had to deal with.
When I asked my Toyota parts man for a caliper frame, he gave me a "torque plate" and if I needed a caliper frame for a Mazda, I'd get a "caliper mount", and for a Land Rover I'd get a "caliper carrier".
On many disc brake systems it is quite a bit more than a "bracket".
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On Saturday, June 18, 2016 at 1:26:41 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@snyder.on.ca wrote:

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I believe that I have already agreed with you that it is known as a "frame" in certain circles. I got it. I bow to your internet search abilities in finding numerous sources where the term "frame", as well as many others, is used to describe the part.
However, I still go back to the fact I can't find a parts web site where I can find a caliper frame. It must be me. My search abilities must suck. I a sked if you could supply a site where I could order a caliper frame. I even aske d for a part number for a caliper frame for your own vehicle. I guess you don 't want to help me out in that regard. OK, we'll move on.
I Googled Toyota torque plate and got this:
http://www.bhjproducts.com/bhj_content/products/honingplates/hp_applist.php /DSC_9841logo.jpeg?v49163474
and this
http://cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/0890/6136/products/DSC_9841logo.jpeg?v=1 449163474
And many more similar hits. If you asked your Toyota parts man for a caliper frame, why would he give you a "torque plate"?
And once again, while I hate to keep going back to this, I'm sincerely aski ng for an explanation. I'm not arguing with you, I'm trying to learn something . Why can I find internet sites that use terms like "Land Rover caliper carri er" but the only thing I can find at sites like AdvanceAuto, AutoEverything , etc. is Land Rover caliper *bracket*. It's not just for the Land Rover caliper carrier, or the Toyota caliper frame, it's for every vehicle I checked at numerous sites. All they sell are caliper brackets, even for the vehicles o n which you say (and have proven) that they are called something else.
If all the other terms are fairly common, why can't you find the parts at auto parts sites using those terms?
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On Fri, 17 Jun 2016 20:49:53 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

https://books.google.ca/books?id=SV7lCwAAQBAJ&pg=PA111&lpg=PA111&dq=brake+parts+%22caliper+frame%22&source=bl&ots ]QuJV22tv&sig=YZeFWABPEnhl9reXSW_sl34kEpk&hl=en&sa=X&ved hUKEwj-5t3r47DNAhUHEVIKHQCPBmcQ6AEIHDAA#v=onepage&q=brake%20parts%20%22caliper%20frame%22&flse
Putting oversized Wilwoods on a BMW E36 - Step 5 says "remove the main part of the caliper from the caliper frame" and "Remove the 2 16mm bolts that hold the caliper frame to the hub" in the book "BMW 3-Series (E36) 1992-1999: How to Build and Modify" By Jeffrey Zurschmeide. on page 111.
The you-tube at
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8IxJFoZxKaE
also refers to removing the slider bolts from the caliper frame.
Land rover calls it a caliper carrier. On a Ford Aspire it's called a "torque member" ` On a Toyota Celica the part is called the "torque plate" Mazda calls it a "caliper mount"
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That's not an area where one needs to use copper grease (lube) to eliminate brake noise (squeal). The copper grease needs to be placed on the back (non-rotor side) of the pad.
That's why I said "No" to his original question. So there! >:p
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This isn't the first time, by your own admission, you've voted wrong. I'm keeping my eye on you. ;-)
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On Fri, 17 Jun 2016 15:10:48 -0500, Gordon Shumway

As a mechanic i virtually never used copper grease(anti-seize) on the back of new pads - but I used the good pads thar come with anti-squeel shims - and sometimes even special silicone brake grease.
I prefer SilGlyde brake grease for rubber parts and squeel pads.
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On Wed, 15 Jun 2016 08:22:33 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Generally yes.
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On Wednesday, June 15, 2016 at 11:22:37 AM UTC-4, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I follow the repair manual for the vehicle. Only one I've worked on in quite awhile is BMW X5. It calls for brake lube, ie special grease, to be put where you showed, plus a couple other spots.
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On 06/15/2016 09:22 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

No.
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On Wednesday, June 15, 2016 at 10:01:27 PM UTC-4, rbowman wrote:

It appears that the correct answer for my area is "Yes".
Caliper brackets in the rust belt can experience "rust-jacking" which can bind up the pad. This is the exact situation I had on a 2007 Honda Civic. I had to bang the pads out with a rubber mallet and then grind the rust of off the bracket in the area behind the pad clips. Once I cleaned up the brackets, the pads slid right in.
Eric O discusses the issue a few times in this video and is seen applying the crease at ~23:00. He does brake jobs in the rust belt section of NY.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Yhw_d_EWrOQ

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On Friday, June 17, 2016 at 9:50:12 AM UTC-7, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Liked the swivel head on the airline (surprised his impact wouldn't take on that second caliber bolt) STG
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On 06/17/2016 10:50 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

If I still lived in upstate NY, I'd buy Nevr-Seez by the case.
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