How do you drill through stainless steel at home?

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What's the trick to drilling a hole through 1/2" thick stainless steel?
From my guardrail experience, I had bought titanium coated drill bits.
So I thought it would be easy to drill a hole in a stainless steel can opener (for hanging on a loop outside by the BBQ cooler).
Nope!
I can't make a dent!

What's the trick to drilling through stainless steel?
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On 3/7/2013 2:46 PM, Danny D. wrote:

1st, you don't have a Ti drill bit. you may have a TiN coated drill bit. the TiN isn't to make it stronger or sharper, it's to make it look better, for the most part.
you probably want a cobalt drill bit.
2nd, you probably want to google this question. there are plenty of resources on the net on how to do this.
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On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 21:46:00 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Ding it with a punch to get started, else you'll just skip around on that convex surface. Use the right cutting fluid and a slow-ish drill speed.
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On Thu, 07 Mar 2013 16:58:09 -0500, Rich Webb wrote:

I didn't get any further than the punch mark with the titanium coated drill bit, even after 10 minutes of trying:

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I'd love to see what's left of that drill bit.
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"Danny D."

** Using a punch work hardens the metal.
Maybe file a flat instead, then fit the drill bit way up in the chuck and try again.
Slowly and with some oil.
... Phil
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wrote:

Good point there. I too often myself default to chucking the bit at the end of the flutes rather than down towards the work.

Machinery's Handbook recommends "Stainless Steel: ... Broaching, threading, drilling, and reaming produce best results using a sulfochlorinated mineral-fatty oil" which, unfortunately, exceeds my knowledge of the subject.
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Just thinking out loud, could you anneal it with a torch before drilling?
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Rich Webb Inscribed thus:

And a carbide drill ! You can buy ones specifically ground for stainless and other hard to machine materials.
--
Best Regards:
Baron.
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I'm certainly not an expert. Looks like you're using a drill press, and small vise, which is good. I wonder, if you rough up the area with a corner of a bench grinder wheel, that might help. Might not.
You might have better luck with a clamp, or some heat shrink tubing to attach the loop.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
What's the trick to drilling a hole through 1/2" thick stainless steel?
From my guardrail experience, I had bought titanium coated drill bits.
So I thought it would be easy to drill a hole in a stainless steel can opener (for hanging on a loop outside by the BBQ cooler).
Nope!
I can't make a dent!

What's the trick to drilling through stainless steel?
Add pictures here
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<% } %>
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On Thu, 07 Mar 2013 17:16:32 -0500, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Indeed. If there was some other way to hang it by the tail, I would.
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You might be able to make a loop shaped like a U. Make the long part of the U, a couple inches long. Slip that over the shaft, and heat shrink tubing over the U and the shaft. The Home Depot near me has heat shrink tubing in the electrical section near wire nuts. Harbor Freight has it, in the box parts section, along with screws, cotter pins, and such.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
On Thu, 07 Mar 2013 17:16:32 -0500, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Indeed. If there was some other way to hang it by the tail, I would.
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Wonder if a welding shop can weld it? Probably for more than the item costs.
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
On Thu, 07 Mar 2013 17:16:32 -0500, Stormin Mormon wrote:

Indeed. If there was some other way to hang it by the tail, I would.
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On Thu, 7 Mar 2013 22:23:55 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

Sheesh... why didn't you mention that before?
1. Do you have a bench grinder? If so, grind a groove around the circumference of the handle. Tie a rope around the groove. Pull tight. It shouldn't slip.
2. Shrink tube and rope. I have some really nasty shrink tube used by PGE to insulate splices. It's quite thick and comes with a sticky heat activated glue on the inside. Put your rope or hook under the shrink tube and use a heat gun to lock it in place. <(Amazon.com product link shortened)>
3. Do a knife handle wrap. Find some flat leather strips, and lace it like it was a knife handle. Apply wet, and it will shrink into place. Attach a rope or hook under the leather.
4. Chinese finger trap. Find one. Apply glue. Slide over handle. <http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chinese_finger_trap> Ummm... don't forget to remove your finger first.
5. Compression fitting. See if you can find a 1/2" compression fitting. It think something in the plumbing department will work. Watch out for stainless to copper corrosion. Also, the electrical department will have power cord compression outlet fittings for electrical junction boxes that might be 1/2". Use your imagination on how to attach a hook.
6. Capacitive discharge spot welding. It's tricky to weld to such a large thermal sink, but I think it can be done with a sufficiently big capacitor. Spot weld a hook onto the handle.
etc...
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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On Fri, 08 Mar 2013 09:21:29 -0800, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Hi Jeff, Actually every one of those would work!
You're very clever (we should invite you to our weekly "inventor's lunch" up in Palo Alto on Wednesdays).
I've been needing to buy a bench grinder for years, so, maybe I'll use this as my need-based tooling!
BTW, the chinese-finger-trap seems the most clever!
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On Fri, 8 Mar 2013 17:28:53 +0000 (UTC), "Danny D."

I don't invent anything. I steal all of my ideas.

You'll also need a left-handed wrench for removing/installing the grinding wheel.

I just noticed the coil cord on the telephone handset. Wrap an old handset coil cord over a hook, around the handle, and add some glue. Totally ugly, but easier than drilling.
Personally, I like the shrinking leather knife handle wrap method mostly because the result will be more artistic than the others.
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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On Fri, 08 Mar 2013 09:44:35 -0800, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

Wasn't than an old native american torture?
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Much like the heat shrink tubing someone with the initials C.Y. mentioned?
Christopher A. Young Learn more about Jesus www.lds.org .
BTW, the chinese-finger-trap seems the most clever!
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On Fri, 8 Mar 2013 14:22:27 -0500, "Stormin Mormon"

Ordinary thin wall heat shrink isn't really strong enough. What he needs is the really thick stuff used for insulating electrical connections and that has sticky goo on the inside, much like what someone with initials J.L. mentioned. <http://solutions.3m.com/wps/portal/3M/en_US/EMDCI/Home/Products/Catalog/~/3M-Heat-Shrinkable-Thick-Wall-Cable-Sleeve-ITCSF-0800-BK-48A-MSHA-Black-8-10-AWG-4-ft-lengths-20-each-per-case?NB94668725+5427538&Nr=AND%28hrcy_id%3AGS36G07Y9Fgs_QLF12KCC9C_N2RL3FHWVK_GPD0K8BC31gv%29&rt=d>
However, if that's too much trouble, just use a hose clamp instead. Form follows function.
--
Jeff Liebermann snipped-for-privacy@cruzio.com
150 Felker St #D http://www.LearnByDestroying.com
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On Fri, 08 Mar 2013 15:27:27 -0800, Jeff Liebermann wrote:

This is an important point!
< begin embarrassing truth >
First, I tried shoe goop + leather strips. Disaster. Luckily, the shoe goop cleaned off the stainless perfectly.
Then I tried rubber strips (made by cutting a 26" length of bicycle tube strips about 1/2" wide. Wouldn't stay on even though I used glue (it unwound while the glue was setting.
Then, in frustration, I simply used electrical tape and hanging wire! Butt ugly!
But, as Jeff said, form follows function ... And, as Oren is fond of saying, "looks fine from far away!".
Here's a picture of the abomination! (Drilling would have been prettier!).

Notice the Ballantine Church Key from the 60s' next to it. At least they had holes in the ends way back then.
I'll probably unwrap the electrical tape when I find something better - but - for now - it should work (but it's fuuuugly).
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