Ailing globe maple

Hi Group,
I'm hoping that someone may be able to help diagnose a problem with a maple tree on my lot in the Toronto, Ontario area (zone 5).
Short history: We moved to this home about 18 months ago and were told that this is a "globe maple", perhaps 10 years old. The previous owner claimed that it had been quite wide in 2002-3, extending almost to the house in the background (12-15 feet). Because of this it had been pruned back to approx. 8-10 feet in diameter. It is now approx. 12-15 feet across. I've posted pictures to Webshots showing the tree from base to tiptop. http://community.webshots.com/album/371776352TmMgNe?762
The problem: One side of the trunk has apparently had some blistering or trauma in the past (photos 1 2 5 7 8) and this has returned in parallel strips as seen in photos 1 2 3. The extent of the earlier damage in the 'ball' of branches can be seen in photos 4 5 6 8. The new split in the bark often weeps sap/liquid all the way to the ground. (Difficult to detail as it has rained lots in the last 10 days.) Recent storms have blown a couple bushels of curled leaves out of the tree. The tree is shaded only in the very early AM and after ~4:00pm by the house next door. Like all maples in this region, leaves last fall were largely covered in mold but no other maples (we have 3 others and many neighboring) are similarly ailing like this globe.
This is a photo of a similar, younger, but apparently healthier specimen in the same climate zone, with description.
http://www.city.hamilton.on.ca/Parks/Forestry/images/Species_Globe.JPG
GLOBE MAPLE Norway Maple variety, dense round form Ball shaped crown Fast growing to 25' spreads to 15' Pale green leaves, fall colour is yellow Suited for small lots or under hydro lines
This three is great for shade so I'm hoping that it will survive many more years, but this blistering and splitting of the bark is worrisome. Can anyone provide info/advice?
Thanks, -- + Tom + antonomasia-at-canada-dot-com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

<snip>
Wow, this tree has a lot going on. I'm fairly certain the vertical cracks are frostcracks, and it appears that a limb was torn down at some point, pulling a lot of live bark down as it fell.
I have to tell you, I loathe Norway Maples in all their various forms for this very reason. As well, they have shallow, greedy root systems and vigorous seeds which sprout everywhere. They are susceptible to verticullum wilt, tarspot, and anthracnose. They have lackluster fall color. There really isn;t anything you can do with regard to the cracking.
--
David J. Bockman, Fairfax, VA (USDA Hardiness Zone 7)
email: snipped-for-privacy@beyondgardening.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 17 Jun 2005 22:59:55 GMT, David Bockman
Hi David, and thanks for your reply.

I'm fairly certain that you are correct about this being frostcracks. The latest were noticed this spring, and the bark has popped away from the crevices which opened underneath. The limb damage may be damage that extended _up_ from the lower bark.

They also produce large amounts of 'garbage' -buds, keys, leaves- all year.

Would it be helpful to use pruning paste on the exposed core wood?
Thanks again,
Tom
-- + TomH + antonomasia-at-canada-dot-com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Nope. :o)
--
David J. Bockman, Fairfax, VA (USDA Hardiness Zone 7)
email: snipped-for-privacy@beyondgardening.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
Looks like sunscald to me; common in thin barked trees exposed to sun on the south or se sides. Sets the tree up for various and sundry fungal diseases.
Acer platanoides, which is what I think you've got, is going to be a big tree at maturity 40-50'x40-50' -- apparently much too big for where you've got it, since someone has already pruned it drastically.
Personally, I'd start looking for specimens that fit the space available, choose one and plant it to replace your norway maple, taking the maple down as soon as your other tree becomes more established. It's easier and cheaper sooner than later, and by choosing a species that fits the site size, exposure and soil type, you'll have a good chance of having a healthy, long-lived tree that adds value to your property.
http://www.extension.umn.edu/projects/yardandg arden/diagnostics/mapleother-s.html
http://www.plantamnesty.org/pruning_tips_content.htm
Kay
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
LOL@ the idea that another tree could begin to get established in the greedy root zone of a norway maple. I think the owner will have to bite the bullet and take down the maple first, as painful as it will be to do without shade for a few years. Red maples are fairly fast growing and don't have the bad habits of either the Norway maple or silver maple, which grows VERY fast.

Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On 18 Jun 2005 02:42:02 GMT, Kay Lancaster
Thanks for your reply, Kay.

Yes, some of this looks like sunscald, however it is on the more northern flank. The broader openings lead me to agree with David Bockman. (Not that one ailment is preferable to the other!)

Yes, I believe it is a 'Norway', however, it is rather small for its age. The pruning was apparently to keep it as the 'globe maple' the original owner purchased. I'll have to keep it well pruned because of the potential for size.

If it comes out, we may well take the opportunity to rearrange some stonework and other bedding sites. (And live with an umbrella for shade in the meantime.)
Thanks again, Tom -- + TomH + antonomasia-at-canada-dot-com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
] On 18 Jun 2005 02:42:02 GMT, Kay Lancaster
] [] ] ] >Acer platanoides, which is what I think you've got, is going to be a ] >big tree at maturity 40-50'x40-50' -- apparently much too big for where ] >you've got it, since someone has already pruned it drastically. ] ] Yes, I believe it is a 'Norway', however, it is rather small ] for its age. The pruning was apparently to keep it as the ] 'globe maple' the original owner purchased. I'll have to ] keep it well pruned because of the potential for size. ]
Hi Tom,
I believe Kay may be grouping all cultivars of A. platanoides together, which does describe your tree IMO. A. platanoides 'Globosum', is what is commonly called a Globe Maple. James Harris describes this as "a small tree to 10m (30ft) high, with a dense, round shape." The van Gelderens describe it as "A modestly growing tree with a flat-topped crown, densely branched.... fruits hardly ever formed." (This tree doesn't figure among the maples I have in the garden, so I can't comment from personal experience.)
So if it dropping seed all over the place, and growing like a weed, it is probably not a globe maple, but some other A. platanoides pruned to a "globe-like" shape. Still, one comment suggest you've got the real cultivar (small for its age).
Injured maples do bleed a lot, but although yours has been through the wars, they're a tough lot. Were I you, I'd give it a few years to see if it recovers.
HTH,
-E
--
Emery Davis
You can reply to snipped-for-privacy@ebayadelka.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Sun, 19 Jun 2005 13:07:00 +0200, Emery Davis

Not dropping keys like its neighborhood brethren, but does grow rapidly. I suspect it would easily attain 25x25' if allowed to spread out, having seen specimens like these: http://www.midwestlandscapeplants.org/plantdetails.cfm?speciesidA6 http://www.diplomlandespfleger.de/englisch/acerplatanoidesglobosum.html
The leaves are much as decribed here: "Leaves sharply and acutely dentate, red-brown in spring, developing to medium green, and yellow in fall." http://oregonstate.edu/dept/ldplants/acplg.htm

I think that I will enjoy this tree in the summer, and NOT in the fall with leaves and pruning.
Thanks for your input. -- + TomH + antonomasia-at-canada-dot-com
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
[] ] The leaves are much as decribed here: ] "Leaves sharply and acutely dentate, red-brown in spring, ] developing to medium green, and yellow in fall." ] http://oregonstate.edu/dept/ldplants/acplg.htm ]
Tom,
As chance would have it I just received a new maple reference, by Antoine le Hardy de Beaulieu. FYI, here's his bit on 'Globosum:'
"A very beautiful cultivar, 8 to 12m (26-39 ft) tall, with a flat crown, and globular, very dense branching. This shape is retained without cutting or pruning but develops slowly. The green leaves are similar in shape but smaller than those of the species. In early spring, the wholly unfolded young leaves present a remarkable appearance: olive green, with red bracts and beautiful yellow flowers -- truly magnificent. This old cultivar is still very much in use. Its globular habit and its proportions make it suitable for urban sites, tree rows, lane borders, and so forth."
There are a couple of pictures, it looks very showy in springtime.
-E
--
Emery Davis
You can reply to snipped-for-privacy@ebayadelka.com
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Mon, 20 Jun 2005 13:10:16 +0200, Emery Davis

Sounds like what I've got.
Thanks again.
-- + TomH + antonomasia-at-canada-dot-com
A: Because it messes up the order in which people normally read text. Q: Why is top-posting such a bad thing? A: Top-posting. Q: What is the most annoying thing on usenet and in e-mail?
Also: http://www.blakjak.demon.co.uk/gey_chr0.htm
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.