goats

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Knowing goats, they'd eat soft hobbles... ;-)
--
Peace, Om

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OK. No more mister nice guy. How about the fenceless dog collars? I hope your herd isn't too large. I believe a wire is buried in the ground and if the collar wearer gets too close to the charged wire, they get a jolt from the collar. If it is adjustable, crank it up. If the sensitivity is adjustable, same thing. Then we aren't just talking a stinking wire but an exclusion zone that they won't be able to be in. If you set the charge too high, maybe Joan Flora (?) in Alaska will have a recipe:-(
It may be too pricey but it may be worth looking into.
- Bill Coloribus gustibus non disputatum (mostly)
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<lol> I wasn't the OP, but that is a concept I'd not thought of. I've personally no experience as to how goats would react to zap collars.
Those fenceless electric perimeters are really not all that expensive iirc.
Tethering my goats to rim/tires worked for us, using a regular dog collar. :-)
YMMV.
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Peace, Om

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Kill a goat. Dig a pit. Put 1/4 cord of good cooking-type firewood in the pit. Let it burn down to coals. Wrap the cut up goat chunks in wetted burlap sacking, after slathering the BBQ sauce of your choice on the meat. Wrap baler twine around the burlap. Lay the wrapped pieces of meat in the pit. Cover pit with a piece of something -- we use plate steel. Shovel dirt over the plate and around the edges. Let the goat cook all night. Uncover, unwrap, eat.
That's how we BBQ beef here, but we generally use more wood and a backhoe to dig the pit.
Jan beef cattle rancher
--
Bedouin proverb: If you have no troubles, buy a goat.

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Thanks Jan, I knew you would have the appropriate recipe. What would you use for garnish and side dishes?
I have almost the same recipe.
Chuckwagon Hoedown Bbq Categories: Beef, Bbq, Jw, Canadian Yield: 480 Servings
1 Steer
From the Northern Bounty cookbook, subtitled "A Celebration of Canadian Cuisine", ISBN 0-394-22431-0.
First you need a backhoe to dig a hole big enough to accommodate several cords of wood. Use hardwoods, apple is good and fenceposts are acceptable, but do not use treated or creosoted wood. Once the wood has burned down to a bed of coals several feet deep, about four hours, prepare the beef: cut into large chunks of 15 pounds each, wrap in butcher paper and then in wet burlap bags; tie securely. Toss the packages directly onto the coals, quickly cover with a large sheet of tin, and cover the tin with dirt. The secret is to keep out oxygen so the coals do not burn quickly and burn the meat. The beef is left to cook- allow 12 hours for this.
After the 12 hours are up uncover the bundles; they will not be charred. Unwrap, slice and serve with baked beans, fresh bread, salads, pickles and for dessert 60 assorted pies and 30 cakes.
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Are your steers grass fed or feed lot? Local stores are getting more requests for grass fed and local ranchers are getting higher prices.
I think the Bay Area may be the slow food capital of the world.
- Bill Coloribus gustibus non disputatum.
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Are you in the Bay Area??? Lordy, I was born/raised there, but left as soon as I came to my senses. That was about the same time I got a drivers' license. Moved to the Mother Lode, then moved to Alaska in 1989. My brothers are still in the Gray Area, but I won't visit, unless there's a really hot ballgame coming up. (SF Giants.) The only thing I miss is professional baseball and the live music. (Bluegrass/Newgrass/Folk/Country. And the Dead. Used to go see The Dead every New Years Eve.)
But I digress... Our cows are grassfed. They'd be "organic" except we have to use commercial fertilizer on our hay meadows, so we are legally allowed to call our animals "natural beef".
Our growing season is too short & cold to do organic fertilizer. Other than that, we grow our own hay & grain. The cows eat green grass in the summer and our hay/grain in the winter. No antibiotics unless some bonehead steps on a nail and comes it holding a hoof up, or something like that. Then the animal will get one shot of Penicillin-G Procaine. Maybe two shots, if the animal isn't a bitch to catch. (When they're well enough to run away from you, that's a good sign.)
We don't feed our cows ground-up sheep parts, old phonebooks, cardboard, chicken manure or any of those things that feedlot cows in America eat. (Cows can digest cellulose. Old phone books & cardboard are made of cellulose. Believe it or not, cows can digest them and some people feed them to cows. I happen to like my cows. I don't feed crap like that to them!)
Side dishes for a BBQ: what you said. Lots of potato salad; lots of pies, cobblers, cakes; cornbread; homemade rolls; LOTS of baked beans; coleslaws; pickled everything; etc.
Growing up in the Gray Area, I never went to a potluck. When I moved to the country, I had to learn. Now when I make lasangne or a pie, I always make two and stick one in the freezer. I have to attend a potluck event at least once a month.
Jan in Alaska Zone 3 -- my soil temp is up to 48F. *woohoo*!!
--
Bedouin proverb: If you have no troubles, buy a goat.

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Well, the goats got the corn again. Too late to replant corn around here. I've never seen more determined goats. They are officially up for sale.
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>does anyone have any advice on keeping our goats out of the garden and flower beds?&nbsp; we had them&nbsp;fenced in&nbsp;high powered&nbsp;electric fencing, but they just run right thru it like it doesn't bother them.&nbsp; hate to have to sell them, as they were gifts to my&nbsp;son&nbsp;from my grandfather before he passed away.&nbsp; just hate them eating all my plants!</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>thanks............</FONT></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>
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The 3 goats were sold this morning. Hated to do that. We tried tethering them & chaining them up, they tangled themselves up to often. They drug the tires & rims around like they weighed nothing. Didn't have the extra money in our budget for a wireless fence and collar system. Eating the remaining of the garden was the last straw so to speak. It was either sell them or let my husband fill them full of holes...........at least i am 150 dollars richer now. Thanks for everybody's help and advice.
Rae
<DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>does anyone have any advice on keeping our goats out of the garden and flower beds?&nbsp; we had them&nbsp;fenced in&nbsp;high powered&nbsp;electric fencing, but they just run right thru it like it doesn't bother them.&nbsp; hate to have to sell them, as they were gifts to my&nbsp;son&nbsp;from my grandfather before he passed away.&nbsp; just hate them eating all my plants!</FONT></DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2></FONT>&nbsp;</DIV> <DIV><FONT face=Arial size=2>thanks............</FONT></DIV></BLOCKQUOTE></BODY></HTML>
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