Energy, health care, agriculture, climate change, global outbreaks like swine flu

Page 2 of 2  


Might I assume that by "buy into", you mean serving as CEO for G.D. Searle, bought out by Pfizer, and serving as Chairman of the Board for Gilead Sciences, Tamiflu developers? ;-)

Pretty damn sturdy limb! Check this out.
http://sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Donald_Rumsfeld#Rumsfeld_.26_Big_Pharma
Charlie
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

We truly hope so.
--

- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

--

- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

This is the kind of misinformation produced by people with an "agenda".
Recombinant forms of influenza like "swine flu" are the results of human - animal interaction of a very close sort. In order for this to happen both must be able to be infected with the virus (like influenza) and the humans and animals have to be in close contact at the time of the infection, either sneezing in each others faces, or, since influenza is shed in the saliva, nasal secretion or FECES the human can also by hand transfer the virus to their own mouth (inhale), nose or eyes, all portals of entry.
In a well run big or factory pig farm (or chicken farm) the workers are required to change into and wear special "clean" suits complete with bootie covers, masks, gloves, hoods and even eye protection. The reason for this is to prevent humans from walking in and/or passing their bacteria and viruses and microbes to the pigs, and, after working they clean up before they leave so they dont track anything out. The cleanup of the feces and urine is done automatically (large amounts which can really foul the environment if not handled properly. Enforcement depends on state). Feeding antibiotics, BTW, has absolutely nothing to do with viruses. Hogs are housed in buildings which limit the entrance of "wild type" bacteria and viruses, mostly by preventing outside disease carrying animals from getting in to the areas so they are much more likely to NOT have disease and much more likely to be healthy (stress aside). A healthy pig will produce large litters, will put on weight and go to market faster. Everything is done to maximize big healthy pigs going to market. I am sure if classical or rock music encouraged growth, they would pipe this in to the barns as well. This is what is typically seen in the US.
In contrast the farms I worked on during the summers of my youth (grandparents and friends) the pigs were out in a pen or field mixing it up with disease carrying wild life. I didnt have much to do with pigs cause I was told to STAY OUT OF THE PIG PENS as they might go after me (pigs eat flesh with relish, BTW). These are not cute little pet pigs. And there is a much higher chance of these pigs carrying diseases that can be transmitted to humans as well.
And then there are the pig factories that have gone to Mexico do so to AVOID the environmental requirements and are flushing, I am sure, the urine and feces right out the "back door". They may have lax enforcement of sanitation within the farms, they certainly have more diseased wild animals (and biting insects to carry disease) in the area and health standards for the workers may be nonexistent along with "time off for being ill". Local labor is cheap and I am sure they make no effort to instruct their workers in health standards, etc.
INgrid Somewhere between zone 5 and 6 tucked along the shore of Lake Michigan on the council grounds of the Fox, Mascouten, Potawatomi, and Winnebago
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Fri, 15 May 2009 09:21:25 -0500, snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

Despite the facts that pigs reach slaughter weight in less than six months and their diet is laced with drugs to control disease, 13.7% of them die before slaughter because of the poor conditions and harsh treatment.
Hogs produce three times more excrement than human beings do. The 500,000 pigs at a single Smithfield subsidiary in Utah generate more fecal matter each year than the 1.5 million inhabitants of Manhattan. The best estimates put Smithfield's total waste discharge at 26 million tons a year. That would fill four Yankee Stadiums. Even when divided among the many small pig production units that surround the company's slaughterhouses, that is not a containable amount.
Smithfield estimates that its total sales will reach $11.4 billion this year. So prodigious is its fecal waste, however, that if the company treated its effluvia as big-city governments do -- even if it came marginally close to that standard -- it would lose money. So many of its contractors allow great volumes of waste to run out of their slope-floored barns and sit blithely in the open, untreated, where the elements break it down and gravity pulls it into groundwater and river systems. Although the company proclaims a culture of environmental responsibility, ostentatious pollution is a linchpin of Smithfield's business model.
A lot of pig shit is one thing; a lot of highly toxic pig shit is another. The excrement of Smithfield hogs is hardly even pig shit: On a continuum of pollutants, it is probably closer to radioactive waste than to organic manure. The reason it is so toxic is Smithfield's efficiency. The company produces 6 billion pounds of packaged pork each year. That's a remarkable achievement, a prolificacy unimagined only two decades ago, and the only way to do it is to raise pigs in astonishing, unprecedented concentrations.
Smithfield's pigs live by the hundreds or thousands in warehouse-like barns, in rows of wall-to-wall pens. Sows are artificially inseminated and fed and delivered of their piglets in cages so small they cannot turn around. Forty fully grown 250-pound male hogs often occupy a pen the size of a tiny apartment. They trample each other to death. There is no sunlight, straw, fresh air or earth. The floors are slatted to allow excrement to fall into a catchment pit under the pens, but many things besides excrement can wind up in the pits: afterbirths, piglets accidentally crushed by their mothers, old batteries, broken bottles of insecticide, antibiotic syringes, stillborn pigs -- anything small enough to fit through the foot-wide pipes that drain the pits. The pipes remain closed until enough sewage accumulates in the pits to create good expulsion pressure; then the pipes are opened and everything bursts out into a large holding pond.
The temperature inside hog houses is often hotter than ninety degrees. The air, saturated almost to the point of precipitation with gases from shit and chemicals, can be lethal to the pigs. Enormous exhaust fans run twenty-four hours a day. The ventilation systems function like the ventilators of terminal patients: If they break down for any length of time, pigs start dying.
From Smithfield's point of view, the problem with this lifestyle is immunological. Taken together, the immobility, poisonous air and terror of confinement badly damage the pigs' immune systems. They become susceptible to infection, and in such dense quarters microbes or parasites or fungi, once established in one pig, will rush spritelike through the whole population. Accordingly, factory pigs are infused with a huge range of antibiotics and vaccines, and are doused with insecticides. Without these compounds -- oxytetracycline, draxxin, ceftiofur, tiamulin -- diseases would likely kill them. Thus factory-farm pigs remain in a state of dying until they're slaughtered. When a pig nearly ready to be slaughtered grows ill, workers sometimes shoot it up with as many drugs as necessary to get it to the slaughterhouse under its own power. As long as the pig remains ambulatory, it can be legally killed and sold as meat.
The drugs Smithfield administers to its pigs, of course, exit its hog houses in pig shit. Industrial pig waste also contains a host of other toxic substances: ammonia, methane, hydrogen sulfide, carbon monoxide, cyanide, phosphorous, nitrates and heavy metals. In addition, the waste nurses more than 100 microbial pathogens that can cause illness in humans, including salmonella, cryptosporidium, streptocolli and girardia. Each gram of hog shit can contain as much as 100 million fecal coliform bacteria.
Smithfield's holding ponds -- the company calls them lagoons -- cover as much as 120,000 square feet. The area around a single slaughterhouse can contain hundreds of lagoons, some of which run thirty feet deep. The liquid in them is not brown. The interactions between the bacteria and blood and afterbirths and stillborn piglets and urine and excrement and chemicals and drugs turn the lagoons pink.
Even light rains can cause lagoons to overflow; major floods have transformed entire counties into pig-shit bayous. To alleviate swelling lagoons, workers sometimes pump the shit out of them and spray the waste on surrounding fields, which results in what the industry daintily refers to as "overapplication." This can turn hundreds of acres -- thousands of football fields -- into shallow mud puddles of pig shit. Tree branches drip with pig shit.
Some pig-farm lagoons have polyethylene liners, which can be punctured by rocks in the ground, allowing shit to seep beneath the liners and spread and ferment. Gases from the fermentation can inflate the liner like a hot-air balloon and rise in an expanding, accelerating bubble, forcing thousands of tons of feces out of the lagoon in all directions. The lagoons themselves are so viscous and venomous that if someone falls in it is foolish to try to save him. A few years ago, a truck driver in Oklahoma was transferring pig shit to a lagoon when he and his truck went over the side. It took almost three weeks to recover his body. In 1992, when a worker making repairs to a lagoon in Minnesota began to choke to death on the fumes, another worker dived in after him, and they died the same death. In another instance, a worker who was repairing a lagoon in Michigan was overcome by the fumes and fell in. His fifteen-year-old nephew dived in to save him but was overcome, the worker's cousin went in to save the teenager but was overcome, the worker's older brother dived in to save them but was overcome, and then the worker's father dived in. They all died in pig shit.
The chairman of Smithfield Foods, Joseph Luter III, is a funny, jowly, canny, barbarous guy who lives in a multimillion-dollar condo on Park Avenue in Manhattan and conveys himself about the planet in a corporate jet and a private yacht. At sixty-seven, he is unrepentant in the face of criticism. He describes himself as a "tough man in a tough business" and his factories as wholly legitimate products of the American free market. He can be sardonic; he likes to mock his critics and rivals.
"The animal-rights people," he once said, "want to impose a vegetarian's society on the U.S. Most vegetarians I know are neurotic." When the Environmental Protection Agency cited Smithfield for thousands of violations of the Clean Water Act, Luter responded by comparing what he claimed were the number of violations the company could theoretically have been charged with (2.5 million, by his calculation) to the number of documented violations up to that point (seventy-four). "A very, very small percent," he said.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

Wow. What a great post :O)
--

- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

You didn't need any help, but when it's pitched slow and over the plate...
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On May 15, 3:21pm, snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:

Surely you are not trying to tell us that some business men are greedy and seek to circumvent the regulations? Some of us had noticed that first from the finance industry and more recently from the government industry.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
snipped-for-privacy@wi.rr.com wrote:
Ingrid, you seem a little shrill lately, everything OK?

Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus: A Growing Link between MRSA Infections and Pigs http://www.biojobblog.com/2009/03/articles/rants-and-raves/methicillin-re sistant-staphylococcus-aureus-a-growing-link-between-mrsa-infections-and- pigs/
SUPERBUGS The new generation of resistant infections is almost impossible to treat. http://www.newyorker.com/reporting/2008/08/11/080811fa_fact_groopman?curr entPage=all -----
And then, this one which has elements for conspiracy theorists everywhere. A tedious but satisfying read.
The A H1N1 Pandemic: Pig to Human Transmission of the Swine Flu? http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid 622
(excerpt) Scientific Evidence of Pig to Human Transmission
A recent authoritative study by the John Hopkins School of Public Health on Industrial Farm Animal Production (IFAP) refutes the statements of the WHO. It confirms that IFAP hog farms are not only the source of contamination of surrounding groundwater but also of the spread of novel viruses including swine flu (See Pew Commission on Industrial Farm Animal Production, Pew Foundation and Bloomberg and John Hopkins School of Public Health, Putting Meat on the Table Industrial Farm Animal Production in Americas, see also Washington Post, May 9 2009). These viruses can be transmitted from pigs to humans and then "from person to person in a community setting and well beyond." (Ibid) The transmission can also occur in the food chain. The virus contaminates the meat which is then consumed: "An infectious agent that originates at an IFAP facility may persist through meat processing and contaminate consumer food animal products, resulting in a serious disease outbreak far from the ifap facility" (See Putting Meat on the Table Industrial Farm Animal Production in Americas, p. 11.)
--

- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
wrote:

Lemme add to this article (thanks for your link). I'm sure Steve is looking in, as this is for him also (wait a minute! I *assume* Steve is a he, but can I be sure? Can't recall any gender identifiers....hmmm...apologies for any erroneous assumptions, Steve...)
Anyway, I digress and wax idiotic in the eyes of some........here's the article
http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=civilization-food-shortages
Charlene, back to the garden........
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 14 May 2009 19:17:33 -0500, Charlie wrote:

Yeah? I gots yur gender identifier right here. ;-)

Thank you, sir. (Livin' on the edge there, eh?)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Ooohhh, I love it when you talk like that! ;-)

:-)
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
On Thu, 14 May 2009 19:17:33 -0500, Charlie wrote:

"When Elizabeth Kolbert, a writer for the New Yorker, asked energy guru Amory Lovins about thinking outside the box, Lovins responded: There is no box." /shudder/
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload
In article

It looks like it's time to reduce energy, and meat consumption, and start eating more plants.
--

- Billy
"For the first time in the history of the world, every human being
  Click to see the full signature.
Add pictures here
<% if( /^image/.test(type) ){ %>
<% } %>
<%-name%>
Add image file
Upload

Related Threads

    HomeOwnersHub.com is a website for homeowners and building and maintenance pros. It is not affiliated with any of the manufacturers or service providers discussed here. All logos and trade names are the property of their respective owners.