Woodworking Classes?

On Wed, 04 Apr 2007 10:57:42 -0400, Corner of My Mind

There are numerous books, although it's more difficult to grasp a technique from words. There are a few woodworking shows on TV/Cable. I've learned techniques even though I did not build the specific project. Classes can be expensive but if you have the cash that will work well. Our local Woodcraft has classes. I learned what I know from my dad, TV, books, videos, craft fairs, etc. Woodworking is mostly a solitary activity.
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SWDeveloper wrote:

Yes, I feel that way too. That is why I was more interested in hands-on type learning.

I think the only shows I get are the ones that air on HGTV. I only pay for basic cable.

I'm hoping the initial upfront costs of buying tools and learning are soon recovered (and then some) by savings between building things versus buying them. Plus I'm hoping custom built built-ins look better than store bought shelves.
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     snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com writes:

Be sure to check the PBS listings. That's where I get my fix of "New Yankee Workshop" and "Woodwright's Shop" (for opposite ends of the power tool spectrum).
(Back to lurking, while pondering what would happen if Norm and Roy collaborated on a show.)
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|Drew Lawson | Of all the things I've lost |
| snipped-for-privacy@furrfu.com | I miss my mind the most |
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Drew Lawson wrote:

PBS... I keep forgetting that station exists. Thanks.
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I'm sure we've all used that rationalization. But don't kid yourself. You will not know when to use cheap materials and when to use better, so you will buy all good stuff and spend more on materials than a pro will. Or you will cut corners when you shouldn't, then have to throw away the bad materials and replace with good, spending more on materials than a pro will. Or you will screw up something and end up spending more on materials than a pro will.
DAMHIKT!!!
And often when making something, you will not be willing to accept the compromises that you find perfectly acceptable when buying a finished piece of furniture.
P.S. I still use that rationalization, but it is not myself that I am trying to convince<g>.

That, to me, is a better reason for doing the work, if you need one other than enjoying it.
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Alex -- Replace "nospam" with "mail" to reply by email. Checked infrequently.

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alexy wrote:

I hadn't thought of those issues.

I am a computer nerd and enjoy tinkering alone so I do imagine I would also enjoy woodworking also.
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On Thu, 05 Apr 2007 09:01:37 -0400, Corner of My Mind

My math abilities complement both programming and woodworking.
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Check with the Woodcraft store in Pompano Beach, 1157 South Federal Highway. Their phone is 954.785.6321. (www.woodcraft.com)
The Woodcraft stores have a pretty good lineup of classes at reasonable prices. I've taken Woodcraft classes in Orlando and Jacksonville. (A Note of Caution: I'm finding there may be some truth in the adage about old dogs and new tricks!)
The Woodcraft stores can also give you information on local woodworking and woodturning clubs.
You might also check the Constantine's store in Ft. Lauderdale for classes and clubs.
Good hunting and welcome aboard,
John Flatley Jacksonville, Florida
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John Flatley wrote:

This seems like an excellent idea. Thanks.
They have 22 classes taught at the nearest location. Of those, I'm guessing the following 3 would be most beneficial for a newbie like me:
* "Woodturning 101 & 201" - 2 Days (15 hours total - lunches?) for $250
* "Tablesaws from A to Z" - 1 Day for $75
* "Learning the Router" - 1 Day (5.5 hours - lunch?) for $75 + materials
So, for about $400 I can become a pro :)

I didn't find any classes listed on their website (http://www.constantines.com /) but I'll drop by and get to know the place as well as Woodcraft store

Thank you.
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Corner of My Mind wrote:

If I had to pick one, I would do the Table saw. Then the router class
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shawn wrote:

Oh, I don't know. Turning can keep some of us occupied for years and there's a lot less tools required. One lathe, a half dozen gouges, scrapers, and chisels, a grinder, and maybe a few sharpening jigs and the OP is in business. Add a chuck and a couple of extra jaw sets after the initial practicing. The whole thing could be done for around $1000, although I'd spring for the new General mini-lathe with the swiveling head which would add around $300 more.
And in many cases, practice wood is free.
Of course, there's a lot more turning stuff out there to spend money on if you're a tool junkie - DAMHIKT :-).
--
It's turtles, all the way down

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Larry Blanchard wrote:

Ok... now I need to confess my ignorance/newbieness.
When I initially saw the list of classes and read their description, I was thinking "woodworking 101 & 201" and not "woodturning 101 & 201". I did not realize my mistake until I read your post.
I think Table Saw and Router would be more beneficial for me if what I'm initially interested in building are built-in bookcases, window seat, and other items that have minimal rounded pieces.
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Protect hearing when using the router!!!
On Wed, 04 Apr 2007 17:32:14 -0500, shawn

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snipped-for-privacy@vcoms.net wrote:

Thanks for the advise. That seems logical to me.
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I've taken 2 classes at the Woodcraft store in Pompano - a one evening turning class and one on sharpening your turning tools. The turning class was with Dean and was very good - all hands-on and left with my first bowl :). The sharpening class was even better - they had to cancel but I never got the message and drove 20 miles anyway, so Jay, the manager, took my in back and showed me how, cranked up a lathe for me to test the newly sharpened gouges on, and gave me some advice to correct my technique. I plan on going back to take the "Woodturning 101 & 201" from Lee Sky soon - he's very good.
Tom
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Tom S wrote:

Well...this is a completely opposite experience than Bill experienced when he took the router class. I wonder if the teaching technique is different based on the class or based on the store/teacher. Since I would be going to the pompano store also because it is the local one to me, this makes me feel a little better.
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Corner of My Mind wrote:

I suspect that it is store / teacher specific and that is why I suggested nosing around before signing up. The Pompano store has had a good recommendation. Two year ago I'd have given my local store much the same recommendation as a former in-law was teaching many of the classes then. We don't keep in touch much and he seems to have moved on. Pity ... he actually knew what he was doing and how to present it.
Bill
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shawn wrote:

Thanks for your recommendation. I really appreciate it.
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On Wed, 04 Apr 2007 17:32:14 -0500, shawn

I agree with the table saw. I probably use it more than any other power tool in the shop. But, you can do woodworking for a lifetime and not use a table saw at all. I have two routers and these are useful and very versatile tools also. Quality hand tools are a good investment as they can last a liftetime and many still prove useful after you buy power tools.
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SWDeveloper wrote:

Interesting paradox. A tool that is used most often but is not needed.

The question is how does a newbie spot a quality tool if he doesn't know what to look for? Is there a brand that is known to only product quality tools? Just look for the most expensive of that tool available?
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