Tool Gloat : Good Will score.


    Today was a Trip to the Good Will with the wife.
    Skillsaw for $25 less the senior discount. Main reason was "The safety switch is where I can 'use' it." (The one I have has the thumb switch located in such a way that I can't reach it with my thumb.)
    And the Delta bench grinder, with two good wheels, for $20. Happy, happy, I've been meaning to do something to sharpen plane knifes and chisels.
    Happy, happy.
--
pyotr filipivich
TV NEWS: Yesterday's newspaper read to the illiterate.
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On Wed, 23 Jan 2019 15:32:57 -0800, pyotr filipivich

You have attain suckage
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typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    I spoke too soon.
    Or did not check close enough. The Saw is missing the "blade bolt", and the washers and flanges. I _might_ be able to replace them with expedites, the bolt is "tricky" as it is an "off size" - from what I see. Who knows, it might actually just be a fine version, or metric. Nerts.
    
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pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
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On Wed, 23 Jan 2019 21:32:16 -0800, pyotr filipivich

Those parts are readily available - and should not cost enough to double the price of the saw - or even raise it 50%.
Check with your local Skill service depot - they may have the parts on a dead saw they will give you for free or very reasonably - but even new they are NOT expensive.
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On Wednesday, January 23, 2019 at 9:31:11 PM UTC-8, pyotr filipivich wrote:

Yeah, one of my Milwaukee saws took a 3/8-24 lefthand thread. Cost three bucks at a good local store. To figure out what yours needs, just give us the model number: someone here will have one to measure..
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typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    Skil 5275-05
Illustrated here: https://www.mmtoolparts.com/store/5275-05-f012527505-parts
    I need part #37 23, 24 and 65.
    It is the #24 "Flange" which is no longer made, and has no replacement, but that could be made "from stock" with a bit of work. Hmmmm "... it's a simple procedure, involving lasers."
tschus pyotr
p.s. "Amazon really does have everything" - including two packs of the blade bolt.
but not the flange. 2610968320
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pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
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On Thu, 24 Jan 2019 08:39:20 -0800, pyotr filipivich

When it comes to power cords I've taken to buying a good exterior grade extension cord and cutting off the female end. I then remove the old cord and surgically remove the cord from the strain releif, then insert the new cord into the strain releif and secure it with a suitable adhesive. I then either attach or fabricate the required terminations on the coed and connect to the tool. If the strain relief is too badly deteriorated I find another one from something else or make one up from rubber tubing or whatever. Ihave also "repurposed" spring strain reliefs that are commercially available.
As for the missing "flange" I suggest checking the parts from whatever saw replaced that one in Skil's line and see what they used - often the complete "assembly" is transferable to the older saw. Using the newer bolt (as long as the thread is the same) along with it's associated parts.
I've done that several times with older Milwaukee tools when I run into an "obsolete" part. (milwaukee 14 inch cutoff saw - replaced the whole handle when 1/2 of the original was no longer available - which also involved an upgraded switch - and on an early Sawzall where the swash plate? for the original ram was no longer available, but the entire upgraded ram assembly was a drop-in (undocumented) replacement ($17 if my memory is correct) For the (discontinued) switch on that saw last year I searched and found another application that used the same original part number and found IT had a supercession to a new part number - which required a different screw. It was also discontinued but a supplier in California had it available n FleaBay. I ordered it and by changing the screw AND modifying a wire it worked perfectly
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On Thursday, January 24, 2019 at 8:38:15 AM UTC-8, pyotr filipivich wrote:

... that is not available from manufacturer. So, you need to measure the double-D driven shaft shape it mates to, and get a suitable size flat washer, drill/file the center hole to fit that shaft.
It is also possible that the manufacturer uses the exact same shaft for other saws, and their other flange washers will fit and work perfectly: when engineering a 'product life management' scheme, they obviously messed up (that part IS commonly required for replacement.
One cannot trust that manufacturer's inventory-number to identify the useful components any more than you can trust their stocking decisions.
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typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    As I said elsewhere "A simple procedure involving lasers." (Classical reference to The Simpsons) I've got the tools, I can make a flange. Drill an undersized hole (~.500") and "mill to fit."

    It maybe required, but that doesn't mean the company is going to keep supporting those tools.
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pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
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On Thursday, January 24, 2019 at 5:50:57 PM UTC-8, pyotr filipivich wrote:

The first four digits of the serial number are the same for all those replacement parts; but, the SAME PART is probably available by a different serial number to 'repair' four or five similar saws. The long serial number enables warranty/inventory controls at the manufacturer, maybe even down to batch level, that no user should have to care about.
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typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    Which explains why the three saws I have, all have different flanges, blade bolts. I would imagine that RepairPartsOnLine.Com has a vested interest in knowing which parts are cross compatible, and which one's aren't.

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pyotr filipivich
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On Thursday, January 24, 2019 at 9:29:24 PM UTC-8, pyotr filipivich wrote:

They posted the manufacturer's diagram/ list, not their own. I was once a warranty agent for a manufacturer that had (? six) different part numbers for the identical computer clock battery, and different prices, too, but they all had the same battery-mfg logos and battery-mfg part number. People have commonsense, companies don't.
For anything under warranty, I had to order the 'correct' part, or not get reimbursed.
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On Friday, January 25, 2019 at 2:24:48 AM UTC-5, whit3rd wrote:

People make decisions, companies don't.

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typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    As may be as well.
    OTOH:     Blade Bolt     Part Number:     1619X00935 * *This part replaces obsolete part #: 2610353049, 2610346554 and 2610016657.
    What irks me, is the lack of information. Is the bolt threaded 5/16 NF x 24tpi or the metric equivalent? (They are close, I checked the bolt against the thread gauges.)

    Companies have "policies" because the "guy who knows that stuff" isn't here/available to make exceptions. I worked a second hand store, and realized that if they opened a second store, a lot of the "way things get done" could not be done that way, because Bill or Dean would not be "here" to make those decisions.

    Yep. One reason that Army specifications get specific about materials, even to brand names, is that the receiving officer very often does not know what actually qualifies as "or equivalent."
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pyotr filipivich
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