Recomendations for power cord "transplant" into a Skilsaw 5150?

    As in "Yes" or "not a good idea"?
    I thought I got a great deal on a Skil 5275:05 - nope. Missing the bolt, etc.     Getting replacement parts is a pain. But I've a "dead" 5150 which I thought could provide parts. Well, sort of.     Then I thought, might be easier to just replace the power cord on the 5150.     But they don't make those anymore.
    So, I'm thinking maybe I could get a "generic"cord and just swap that. Any ideas?
tschus pyotr
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pyotr filipivich
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On Thursday, January 24, 2019 at 1:34:48 AM UTC-5, pyotr filipivich wrote:

I have used portions of extension cords (for heavier duty tools), cords from dead tools and even purchased replacement cords on *Bay. They all work. Understand the amp draw of your particular tool, do not undersize the gauge to save a couple of $.
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On 1/24/2019 9:23 AM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

In determining the size of the wiring, check the engineering recommendations, but temper it by checking the cords on similar equipment at you local store. I have found that the cords on new 1hp motors table saw, is less that the engineering recommended size. I don't know if I misunderstood the current draws or the fact that the cord that comes on the equipment is short caused the apparent under sizing.
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On Thursday, January 24, 2019 at 1:34:48 AM UTC-5, pyotr filipivich wrote:

I just put this on a PC 743 c-saw:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
I also replaced this, which was in way worse shape than the cord itself:
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
One of main differences between OEM cords and non-OEM cords is that the OEM cord may come with connectors on the end that are used specifically with the OEM switch, etc.
Obviously, the non-OEM cord should be spec'd at least the same as the OEM one.
The B&D cord I used has the same part number as the PC cord and it matched exactly except for the ring connectors. The OEM cord protector was as snug a fit as you would like so as a pair they worked well together.
Another thing to consider is the diameter of the cord. The cord for the PC is "clamped" to the saw by the 2 piece handle. If the replacement cord had been too small, it would have been loose. If it had been too big, I would not have been able to screw the handle back together. In my case, the screws were used to draw the handle parts together and compress the cord. Since I didn't want to take a chance of stripping the holes in the plastic handle, I used clamps to close the handle gap and compress the cord, and then screwed the screws down tight before removing the clamps.
Perfect fit.
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On Thursday, January 24, 2019 at 3:06:34 PM UTC-5, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Nice explanation...Thanks for sharing
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Just remember that the outside diameter of the cord does not determine the current carrying capacity. Check the label for the conductor size. I would use 14-gauge wire for a 15-amp tool like a drill and 12-gauge wire for a big tool like a table saw. Some "heavy duty" cords in the big box stores seem to mean "heavy duty covering," not heavy wires.
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On Wednesday, January 23, 2019 at 10:34:48 PM UTC-8, pyotr filipivich wrote:

There's a plug, cord, strain relief, and some terminated wires involved. Ideally, you'd get a similar-diameter cord, remove the old wires from the strain relief, and by stretching the vinyl sheathing, extract the old sheath from that strain relief (which is usually molded on top of the cable). Then any cord that fits snugly can be threaded through the original strain relief.
Crimping or soldering the right terminations onto the wires is a hassle, but they DO still make those fittings. Match the colors of the old wire with the new ones. US normally uses green-white-black, European standard is green/yellow-blue-brown, so if there's no white wire, use the blue one... green and green/yellow are grounds, the two-conductor cords won't have those colors.
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wrote:

Be careful there. If it's US spec it's 120v, if it's european speck its 240v. If you're in Europe and find a US-spec cord double-check the voltage on the tool. If you're in the US and find a European-spec cord, again double-check the voltage.
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On Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 12:30:11 PM UTC-8, J. Clarke wrote:

Any cord with the right kind of plug molded on the end will be OK for the voltage that goes with that plug; I've seen the European-standard colors on 120V cordsets, though.
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wrote:

The cord doesn't care about voltage, the tool does.
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On 2/10/2019 5:11 PM, J. Clarke wrote:
...

U think the manufacturer will have put the wrong voltage plug/cordset on the tool???
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No, I think that if it has US cord set and you are in the EU, after you replace it with an EU cord set and plug your 110 volt tool into the 220 there will be much spitzensparken followed by escape of the magic smoke. Going the other way it may decide to burn up more slowly.
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wrote:

Yes, I've seen the euro colours on 120 volt cords too - and they are virtually ALL rated for a minimum of 300 volts -usually 600.
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On Sunday, February 10, 2019 at 3:16:35 PM UTC-5, whit3rd wrote:

You may have missed one part. I'm not sure what you are referring to as the "strain relief" but my PC circular saw has a plug, cord, *cord protector*, strain relief and terminated wires.
What I would call the strain relief are the protrusions on the 2-part handle, that when screwed together clamp the cord tightly. The cord protector is a separate piece that simply slides onto the cord and is also held in place by the handle, but not nearly as tight as the cord holder/strain relief. It basically just sits in a channel so it can't move fore or aft.
(Amazon.com product link shortened)
On my saw here's nothing "molded" to the cable other than the plug.
Maybe the Skil 5150 is different, but that's how my PC saw is set up.

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On 2/10/2019 4:53 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

A strain relief is a grommet or bushing or something molded on the cord that tightly holds the cord, typically as it goes into a housing.
The purpose is so that the wire terminals, that connect to the electronics inside a housing, will not be pulled if you pull on the cord.
Some cords have a guard/strain relief that extends a couple of inches to prevent the cord from being bent too severely as it exits a housing.
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On Monday, February 11, 2019 at 2:23:56 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

It's not as simple as that.
On my PC 743 that "guard/strain relief" is indeed called a "strain reliever" on their parts list, but it does not serve the "purpose (such) that the wire terminals, that connect to the electronics inside a housing, will not be pulled if you pull on the cord." It only serves the purpose of "preventing the cord from being bent too severely as it exits a housing." The fact that it spins on the cord proofs that.
The actual strain relief that protects the terminal connections is actually molded into the handle itself. It's not a separate grommet or bushing or anything molded onto the cord. In between the internal end of the "strain reliever" sleeve and the terminal connections are 2 protrusions in the handle channel that the cord goes through. When the handle is screwed back together those protrusions pinch the cord and hold it tight. So tight that I clamp the handle closed instead of relying on the screws in the plastic handles to provide the crushing force. I fear that I'll strip the screw holes.
Even though PC lists P/N 901266 as a "strain reliever", other parts suppliers list it as a "cord protector" which is much better description since it protects the cord but does not provide anything in the way of terminal connection protection.
https://tricitytoolparts.com/products/901266-porter-cable-cord-protector-boot-replaces-843464-875590
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