What paint for furniture

I got a nice little desk from the Salvation Army for $69 (US). But it is white. Now I need to figure what kind of paint I need to change the color. I need something pretty tough, because I will be using it as a desk and a part time workbench for assembling small items. The top has some mars, I will need to clean and seal it. On one edge it is damaged a bit. Probably from being pushed up against a wall.
I understand that the procedure for the painting is: 1 Clean it good with some sort of general purpose cleaner. 2 Sand it with fine grit sandpaper. 3 Clean it with a tack cloth. 4 Prime it 5 Sand 6 Tack Cloth 7 Paint 2 coats. 8 let dry thoroughly
Any suggestions?
Thanks Bill
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wrote:

Maybe a few coats of polyurethane - over the paint - on the top for durability ? .. making the toughness of the paint less of a factor. Be sure to let the paint cure for a week or so. John T.
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wrote:

Waterborne polyurethane is probably the safe bet. Something solvent-based is risky unless you know what's already on it.
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On 1/24/2019 9:23 AM, Bill Gill wrote:

Is it possible that the wood under the paint is something really nice? If so, I'd strip it and polyurethane it. If you want paint, a good enamel should do.
Going back 30 years or more, it was common for people to "antique" furniture by painting it with a kit. Some nice wood got hidden for the sake of some trendy style.
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On 1/24/2019 8:30 PM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

This desk was built in Vietnam for Pottery Barn Kids. I doubt if it is all that wonderful. My first thought was High Density Fiberboard, although the drawers look kind of like wood.
Bill
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On Thursday, January 24, 2019 at 9:24:02 AM UTC-5, Bill Gill wrote:

Check out Benjamin Moore Advance.
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On 1/24/2019 8:23 AM, Bill Gill wrote:

so that objects will not stick to the surface I would advise to avoid latex type paints. I would go with an Alkaid Oil based paint.
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On Friday, January 25, 2019 at 12:07:58 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

The Benjamin Moore Advance paint may fit the need without the oil paint clean up.
"A premium quality, waterborne alkyd enamel that delivers the desired flow and leveling characteristics of conventional alkyd paint. It provides a tough, satin finish that stands up to repeated washing. It is easy to apply, resists spattering and cleans up with soap and water."
I used it on the cabinet/bookcase I built for the kitchen.
"Ideal for interior doors, trim, cabinets, walls, and ceilings. For primed or previously painted wallboard, plaster, masonry, wood and metal."**
However...
"Depending on weather and drying conditions, it could take up to 30 days to reach optimum hardness and final sheen."
Because of other things I was doing in the kitchen and then a 2 week vacation, I was actually able to let my project cure for the full 30 days before use.
**I'm not sure about that "Ideal for...walls and ceilings" claim. Even my Benjamin Moore dealer was hesitant. When I went to buy the paint for the kitchen walls, she suggested the Aura line instead of the Advance. She said it can be very hard to prevent sags with the Advance line. It is kind of thick.
The Aura is very quick drying. Under the proper conditions you can recoat i n 1 hour. I actually enjoyed painting with it. Did the whole kitchen in one d ay.
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On 1/25/2019 5:56 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I found a review of the Aura paint. The reviewer apparently had some of the same problems. He suggested General Finishes paint. It is available here in Tulsa at Woodcraft.
Bill
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On Friday, January 25, 2019 at 9:34:38 PM UTC-5, Bill Gill wrote:

d
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I'm not sure what you are talking about.
I posted nothing related to "problems" with the Aura paint.
In fact, my exact words were: "I actually enjoyed painting with it."
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On 1/25/2019 10:07 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

My bad. I meant the Advance.
Bill
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On 1/25/2019 5:56 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

And why I suggested an oil based paint. They typically are good to go in 24 hours.
As far as clean up goes. I would much rather clean up with thinner than soap and water. Thinner cuts oil based paint almost instantly. Soap and water on water based paint takes quite a while at the faucet. I throw rollers away for both paints.

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On Tuesday, January 29, 2019 at 12:05:59 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

d
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Ah, but a question still remains:
Which ends up harder after it's own published curing time? I don't know the answer, I just ask the questions. ;-)
In other words, does the Advance paint end up harder and more durable after it's 30 day complete cure than the oil paint does after it's 24 hour comple te cure? Let's not quibble over cure times. Let's wait 6 months and then test both paints. I'm pretty sure that they would both be 100% cured by then.
If the Advance paint is harder than the oil 6 months down the road, then it's the better paint for a "desk/part time workbench". Again, I'm not sayi ng that it will be, I'm simply saying that it's not about cure time, it's abou t ultimate hardness/durability.
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On 1/29/2019 5:39 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

I use Sherwin Williams Oil based Alkyd paint on all of my wife's quilting studio furniture, 7 separate pieces. Nothing sticks to it and the surface is hard. She regularly swaps out sewing machines from her 8' sewing table with no stick spots or marks left in the paint surface. If there is a harder drying surface, she/we don't need it. And seriously who wants to wait 30 days or 6 months to use the surface? We actually wait 3~4 days to place the sewing machines and fabrics on the surfaces but we can easily handle the painted surfaces 24 hours after application.
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On 1/30/19 10:53 AM, Leon wrote:

Weren't you the guy who swore by conversion varnish for painting stuff that needs a hard, non-tacky finish. I was researching some cabinet door/drawer providers and they seem to all use a conversion varnish as a top coat.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On 1/30/2019 6:14 PM, -MIKE- wrote:

Not me. Although I have used a gel varnish on top of flat paints.
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On 1/31/19 8:49 AM, Leon wrote:

I bet it was Robert.
--

-MIKE-

"Playing is not something I do at night, it's my function in life"
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On Thursday, January 31, 2019 at 9:15:14 AM UTC-6, -MIKE- wrote:

LOL... bet you are right. Still use it, still love it. Can't brush it, but if you can spray lacquer, you can spray this stuff.
A lot of speculation on what to use on furniture, and for me, no question i t would be alkyd. Latex is considered a permeable finish, and alkyd is alm ost impermeable. With alkyd finishes the abrasion resistance is much great er and its light resistance is higher.
Green strength of alkyd is 48-72 hours depending on site conditions such as ventilation, temperature and humidity. Full cure is about 21 days accordi ng to SW, Coronado, Pittsburgh etc.
Latex is not a favorite for horizontal surfaces, high abrasion surfaces, or surfaces exposed to water. NOTE: I specified horizontal surfaces. Latex will shed water when given a chance (vertical surfaces) but is still a per meable surface. I have seen green/cure times vary so wildly over the years I wouldn't speculate on either.
So as a contractor, I need something I can control and something I can rely on for specific performance. I use latex on walls, some trims, alkyd on ev erything else.
To see a brief discussion on permeability of paints, check out this link:
https://www.dulux.ca/diy/tips-tricks/common-problems/filler-shows-through-t he-paint-(4)
Robert
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On Fri, 1 Feb 2019 01:05:19 -0800 (PST), " snipped-for-privacy@aol.com"

If abrasion resistance matters to you you want urethane. Some time back I spent a good bit of the taxpayers' money evaluating the abrasion resistance of various paints to use on military aircraft and the result consistently was that urethanes were as a group the most abrasion resistant paints available. There were more resistant coatings (thick nickel plating or boron carbide for example) but they could not be applied with a sprayer.

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On Friday, February 1, 2019 at 6:06:18 AM UTC-6, J. Clarke wrote:

No doubt there are superior finishes of all types for any application that address specific aspects of coatings.
Working within the context of the OP's question, I would not suggest a coating that he probably could not apply without training, would no doubt have to purchase additional specialized equipment to apply, and would cost more than the desk itself.
Doubtful a well meaning hobby/DIY guy (but certainly not excluding the possibility) of application of true industrial related coatings (NOT paint) that you speak of.
Just in case, this is my first resource:
https://protective.sherwin-williams.com/
Robert
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