The Houston Gang

On 9/3/2017 5:53 PM, dpb wrote:

That area had to deal with Hurricane Beulah in 1967, IIRC. I lived in Corpus Christi and we were on the dirty side of that storm, we had street flooding for two straight days.
BUT I wish the best for all of your relatives that got caught up in this disaster.
There is still severe flooding a few miles from our home.
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On 9/3/2017 12:57 PM, dpb wrote:

I do not know the rules, I'm sure it depends on the location. BUT I recall seeing the trailers everywhere, mostly in driveways.
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If it's designed to be a house trailer or RV and if it's on your property, why would there be an issue?
Are you suggesting that in Houston it's illegal to park your RV in your driveway?
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On Sun, 03 Sep 2017 16:32:16 -0400, J. Clarke

A house trailer would be an issue just about anywhere but a RV trailer might be different. OTOH, if you're living in it, the gendarmes might get a little tight-lipped about it.

Not allowed here (dumbass HOA).
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On Sun, 03 Sep 2017 21:06:41 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

I would not buy any property that was afflicted by an HOA. Of course the town here thinks it's an HOA so I really need to look into moving.
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On Sun, 03 Sep 2017 21:36:08 -0400, J. Clarke

It's getting hard to buy without an HOA, anymore. Developers use them to protect themselves during build-out, then dump the mess on the homeowners. Ours may have gotten the message that we're not interested (haven't heard from them since the last annual meeting but this year's is next Saturday).
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On 9/3/2017 9:12 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

In the Houston area the HOA takes over where the local governments leave off. Our HOA pays for landscape crews to keep up with the common areas and the entrances. The HOA pays for maintenance around the neighborhood and pays for street lighting, mosquito control, etc.
I actually prefer to be in a strict HOA, you can not buy in a neighborhood with knowing and agreeing to the rules and regulations. Our HOA is not terrible to deal with....I'm the president. ;~) But we do want residents to pay their dues and to not be the eye sore on the street.
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The only common areas we have are the two entrances to the subdivision (~70 homes). The HOA plants annuals around the signs and mows around them (big deal). I'd prefer they plant perennials and ditch the signs. They serve no purpose, now that the subdivision is completely build. They also bought an unbuildable lot off the last developer (the first went bust in '08) for some unknown reason. It would make a lousy park or whatever. It's at the edge of the development and would only serve as a place for kids to drink (and whatever). That's what the cul-de-sacs were before the subdivision was built out.

The problem is that everyone has a different definition of "eyesore" and the definition charges dramatically over time. It's not just "eyesore" that changes, either.
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On 9/4/2017 7:50 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

Down here and I suspect there too, the developers are board members on the HOA. Until the subdivision is actually built out the developer's remains on the board. Purchasing the unbuildable lot from the developer "down here" would mean that the HOA would be able to elect it's own home owner board members and do what is best for the HOA vs what is best for the developer. Our neighborhood is about 12 years old but the HOA was not controlled by the home oners until about 6 years ago.

Well that is true but when you buy into a subdivision with a HOA "here" you agree to the terms or you cannot close on the house. So by initialing that you agree to the terms, you agree. If you have problems with that you have no one to blame but yourself.
Not pointing the finger at you, just speaking figuratively.
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On Monday, September 4, 2017 at 10:45:16 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:



In my opinion, Texas should have a "universal code" or some kind of promulg ated, recognized rule set for HOAs. Some here are tyrannical, and some are like toothless old dogs that can only bark.
I work in small developments that I charge the daylights out of for everyth ing because of the HOAs. If I repair a roof, I have to certify in writing that I searched to find the closest match shingle to the existing. So if O .C.'s Estate Gray is off by a shade or two, they can require the homeowner try another factory run. ALL paint colors for everything must be approved by an architectural committee. Same with landscaping, same with types of pl ants and grasses, sprinkler systems, types of trees (no nut trees), and on a on. No animal feeding;, no birds, squirrels, hummingbirds, or deer.
My dumpsters have to be graffiti free, and if graffiti appears over a weeke nd, I must replace the dumpster. As a rule, I don't use rusted or damaged dumpsters, but these guys require that I net the top of it every night and lock the door as well. I have to charge to haul siding to a place where it isn't viewable from the street from any angle. So even when siding is del ivered, we haul it to the back of the house and stack it, then haul it to t he front as needed. Even I am starting a siding job the moment the siding is delivered, I have it all hauled to the rear.
I cannot start work earlier than 9am, nor work later than 5pm. You don't ma ke money in construction working those hours, and if it is 4pm, and the nex t step could take two hours, you pack up and go home. Add the extra time t o the client's bill and start up the next day where you left off. The HOA vigilantes call the police if your truck is parked going against traffic. They call the police to alert them if your employees have a truck that has a ground clearance (14", I think).
They write HOA "citations" for excessive noise. No equipment can be left vi sible at the end of the day, period. A small loader or lift, nope. Scaffo lding must have a "permit" from the HOA that is approved by the architectur al committee for a certain amount of time.
Remodeling is almost impossible as they control every aspect of design, fin ish materials and even finish out materials. For their very lives, the HOAs can't figure out why contractors hate them. It isn't just the funny littl e man with the big paunch in his baggy shorts with his spindly white legs, his black socks in white dress shoes walking a chihuahua with his coolray b ifocals that snoops around on the job, interrupts your workers, reminds the m of rules they don't care about, and asks stupid questions.
It is because they can stop your job anytime, even if they don't know what you are doing. If you don't stop at any time when they want you to, they c an fine the homeowner (my client). They can take a homeowner to court anyt ime and force them to pay both sides of the legal teams.
That represents almost all of the HOAs that were started about 20 years ago to now. Older HOAs, they got nothing. They can make suggestions, but tha t's it. If there is a rule about one thing or another, they don't have the money to take anyone to court. Besides, the language of the HOA articles is so loose it simply says that "this or that isn't allowed". No indicatio n of penalty should that situation occur.
Can't say about Houston. They are screwy to begin with due to their lack o f zoning and bizarre building codes. It will, no doubt, be a challenge for my brother in law since he is the long standing president of their HOA.
Truthfully, I think there is so much devastation in Texas now that just get ting folks dry, safe and accounted for is the priority. One of the FEMA gu ys said on TV "this wasn't going to be another New Orleans". I think they mean it. Don't forget that the former mayor or New Orleans, the guy that O prah cried and hugged on TV many times, the guy that was lauded a such a gr eat humanitarian, a sensitive guy that put his people first... is still in prison for stealing just about every thing he could. In fact, he has just been called out of prison to be deposed on more corruption charges. His re lease date is at this point up for speculation.
Once again, we will see.
Robert
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Yes, and has veto power over the board. That's why I said that HOAs are designed to protect the builder during build-out. He couldn't care what happens after.

It's just one lot (and the last one). The builder has ultimate control until he sells the last house.

About half the subdivision was built in 2006 and 2007. Wen the fit hit the shan in 2008, the builder went bust (with some foundations started) and the other half of the lots reverted back to the bank. A new builder bought the property from the bank in 2014 and finished the subdivision in 2015 and 2016 (finishing the houses on those 8YO foundations). The HOA bought the unbuildable lot in 2016, IIRC, just as the last of the homes were selling. Note that the builder(s), nor the bank paid any HOA fees.

The fact is that the rules *can* change after the game begins.

Understand. I don't know if being appointed to an HOA board makes people crazy or if it's only the crazy people who sit on HOA boards.
Not pointing a finger at you, just speaking figuratively. ;-)
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On 9/5/2017 12:30 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

LOL. I always went to the meetings and one day the HOA VP visited me and indicated that the secretary resigned. He asked if I would be willing to fill that spot, I accepted. FF about a year and the board made me president. I keep getting reelected with no opposition and reassigned to hold the president position.
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Leadership is sometimes a position they give you to keep you from causing trouble. You weren't causing trouble for them, were you Leon? ;-)
Puckdropper
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On 9/5/2017 3:24 PM, Puckdropper wrote:

LOL, I may have been a trouble maker way back. I was awarded management position of an automotive tire center for Ameron Automotive Centers in 1975, I was 21.
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On 05 Sep 2017 20:24:02 GMT, Puckdropper

It's also something given to you because you didn't step backwards fast enough.
You do have a point, though. I think twice before I speak at our annual meeting. My mouth may earn me something my ass doesn't want to pay for.
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On 9/5/2017 8:54 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

IIRC they don't make you take a management position, they ask you. Whether you take it or not is strictly up to you.
Having always been in a management position since 21, it was not that big of a deal for me.

So think before you speak. ;~)
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Why am I not surprised?

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On Sunday, September 3, 2017 at 3:32:26 PM UTC-5, J. Clarke wrote:

I remember temporary exclusions being made from time to time.

I read the City Codes (you can look them up easily if you are asking as mor e than a talking point) and they are very specific regulations on number of axles, length of trailers, specifics on equipment, equipment trailers, and on a on. So a dual axle RV falls under the City Codes, as does a dual axle trailer of any type, including livable trailers.
It is illegal to park any vehicle, trailer, piece of equipment, implement o f anything that resembles those examples off an "improved" surface. So you can't just haul out trailer and put it in your backyard or alongside the h ouse. Any of those things has to be parked on asphalt, concrete, or "other wise improved" surfaces. The intent is that they don't want grandparents t railer hauled into the front yard (or backyard)of a subdivision and have it sink in the yard up to the axles.

Not to park it, but to leave it for a length of time, yes. We have a limit on how long they can stay if they have dual axles. We have another ordina nce that keep people from hooking up to electric, sewer and water services for more than a few days. No one wants to hear the generators running all night, see oozing sewer pipes, the lights hanging off the sides of the trai lers so the occupants can sit outside and drink beer. Citizen complaints c an greatly shorten the time allowed to have a living unit on your property.
To be clear, some RVs are too large to be allowed. IIRC, Houston's length ban is 20'. No one wants to see some weekend warrior that is used to drivi ng nothing large than his minivan trundling down crowded streets, or trying to back into a narrow driveway jackknifing the trailer while he blocks the streets figuring out how to back a trailer he uses twice a year. And some people guests just don' know when to leave.
The biggest problem that we had here before all the mountain of ordinances were passed was that people drug trailers into their driveways and used it as a permanent bedroom for their elderly relatives, unruly teenagers and ev en party houses to watch sporting events. Pretty convenient; you have plac e to watch the event, a fridge for the beer, and even weatherproof conditio ns to do it in. Some of those trailer stayed in the driveways for YEARS, Y EARS, axles rusted solid, non working brakes, and sitting on cinder blocks since the tires had long rotted out.
Most likely there will be a great amount of leeway and discretion shown in trailer use and placement due to the incredible severity of the housing sho rtage. In the hundreds of briefings and updates that have followed in the l ast tend days, I did catch one where the FEMA guys responded about the trai ler availability and use and he said they were proceeding quickly but caref ully, adding that they had "learned a lot since Katrina".
Guess we will see. I don't think anyone knows exactly what is going to hap pen on any long term aspects of this situation yet. I have been in touch w ith my sister quite a bit and at last the water is out of her house. But t hey are still pretty much on their own, hauling out all their furniture and belongings by themselves. All the aid is still focused on relocating peop le, feeding them, and secondary searches of houses and debris, cleanup, etc .
Robert
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On 9/4/2017 12:57 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

My first reaction is, under the circumstances just suspend the regulations for three to six months. Upon second thought, after the allotted time how do you get them moved out? Nothing good would come of it.
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On 9/4/2017 8:06 AM, Ed Pawlowski wrote:

That is how I understood that it worked in the past. Most trailers were provided by Fema so no one really owned them.
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