quality bandages

i use them from time to time but have found the quality has gone down
i had a large stock but the replacements are not as good
anyone find a bandage that will stay put even if it gets wet
these new ones come off even from sweat
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On Thursday, May 10, 2018 at 1:18:23 PM UTC-5, Electric Comet wrote:

Not so much the bandage, itself, but Aerozoin spray is used to help a banda ge and/or tape stick and stay stuck. Often, for nicks, scrapes and cuts t o my hands, I spray a bit of Aerozoin on a Q-tip, rub it where the bandaid tape will be placed, allow to dry a few seconds, then apply the bandaid. S tays stuck all day and beyond showering, if need be. Long ago, Aerozoin w as sold/known as ToughSkin, used a lot by ball teams for/when applying band ages or wraps of various kinds, for skin or injury protection of sorts.
Benzoin is used on canker soars and on delicate skin sites as a "skin tough ener"-like assistant or wound cover (of sorts), until the skin heals.
Not sure, but both products should be available over the counter at your lo cal Rx.
Sonny
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11:18:16 -0700 typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    What brand are you using?     Which brand were you using?
    I kept a roll of micropore tape to close up the small nicks.
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
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On Thu, 10 May 2018 13:02:45 -0700

no idea the ones i ran out of were a cloth type and stuck on for a long time
the new ones are different varieties of crap
one is a stiff plastic and comes off in minutes of any movement might be okay on the arm or leg but doubt it
other one is cloth but will not stick to itself so you wrap it around a finger and overlap and try to stick to the cloth and it comes off

will look for this sounds familiar
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12:07:18 -0700 typed in rec.woodworking the following:

    I hate it when that happens. B-)

    You can also use it to keep the bandaids closed.
--
pyotr filipivich
Next month's Panel: Graft - Boon or blessing?
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On 5/10/2018 1:18 PM, Electric Comet wrote:

Not a bandage, per se, but a waterproof, rubberized tape that is slicker than greased owl shit.
I have a persistent problem with on fingernail on my dominant hand that continually will start to split. I'll catch it on something and it will split further. Only rarely can I super glue or keep tape on it long enough for the damn thing to grow back without catching it on something all over again. Just had a small piece break off a week or so ago. Looking at the drug store I found this flesh colored, rubberized tape said to be waterproof. Damned it it wasn't. I put one piece on the nail longitudinally to protect the area of the nail bed that was exposed and one piece to make it around the circumference of the nail (about 1 ½ turn), not too tight. After three days there was no sign it was giving up its hold but I wanted to "air it out" to let the skin breath a bit.
I found a new best friend. Bye-bye Super Glue, you never worked that well for me anyway.
I would love to give you the name but it was in a blister pack and I tossed the packaging and just keep the unused portion of the roll in a zip lock sandwich baggie. It was, I believe, a major brand and I bought it at the local Jewel-Osco (food & drug chain) owned by Albertson's.
It should not be difficult to find it if you look. Works like a charm and for a bandage, just roll your own with a bit of gauze or . . .
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On 5/10/2018 10:56 PM, Unquestionably Confused wrote:

I have found that a good emergency bandages is a roll of paper towels. I carry a roll in all of my vehicles that are stored in a plastic bag. While it may not be perfect the bag keeps it clean, strong, and it can soak up a lot of blood.
I realized the importance when we came upon a car wreck. The victim had the type of skin the came off in sheets, I don't know what we would have done with out paper towels.
--
2018: The year we learn to play the great game of Euchre

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On 5/11/2018 6:13 AM, Keith Nuttle wrote:

[snip]

Another one (from time spent working on an ambulance crew before there were paramedics) is sanitary napkins. Sealed in paper and used with an ACE or other bandage, they were outstanding for pressure bandages. A newspaper, or even a magazine, makes for a great splint.
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On Friday, May 11, 2018 at 7:13:59 AM UTC-4, keith snipped-for-privacy@sbcglobal.net wrote:

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Paper towels with duct/electrical/painters/packing/gorilla/etc. tape. Whate ver you have handy.
BTDT lots of times. Not waterproof per se, but most tapes stay on.
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On Thu, 10 May 2018 21:56:32 -0500

will look for this sounds good
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As a guy that in the drier months, has frequent splits in the skin along th e edge of the fingernail, I've used finger protection tape for a while. The last brand I bought (multiroll pack 12 rolls/pack) "bantex" cohesive gauze by brasel products, turns out to be pretty waterproof. I've recently (effe n aging process) developed trigger thumb- where the thumb only likes to be in a couple positions- anything in between the 2 positions is painful, so I splint the thumb and that alleviates the notchy ness for a bit . I was usi ng gloves to keep the water off the splint but found that the water doesn't even start to loosen or unravel the gauze over the splint. I leave it on f or the day with frequent immersions and it's still doing the job. Bought o ff fleabay BTW- careful one place showed a pic of the pack of 12 in the adv ert and sent one roll instead of 12! Lesson learned... Regards, Pat
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On Saturday, May 12, 2018 at 7:03:39 AM UTC-5, patrick wrote:

the edge of the fingernail, Pat
This goes for Questionably Confused, also, since you have splitting nails.
Cracking or spliting skin near the nail bed, splitting of the nail and/or t hin/small "lines"/streaks showing on/under the nail, raised ridges on the n ail(s) and clawing of the nail are signs of significant and/or advanced hea rt disease. These symptoms/signs are also often prevalent on the toe nails , as well. I would advise you to go have a thorough physical performed.... by an internist, cardiologist.... if you are not already under the care of a physician.
Sonny
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https://youtu.be/q4awo34rpC8

https://youtu.be/q4awo34rpC8

Interesting, I'd not heard nails could be a cardiovascular problem indicator but I do remember being taught in school (in the '60s) that the quarter-moon visible at the base of the thumbnail is a sign of good health.
Earlobe creases are another possible indicator of cardiovascular disease.
http://haydeninstitute.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/Ear-Crease-Cardiovascular-Disease.jpg
https://www.healthline.com/health/heart-disease/ear-creases https://myheart.net/articles/earlobe-crease-and-heart-disease-fact-or-myth/ https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4697048/
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On Sat, 12 May 2018 05:03:35 -0700 (PDT)

will look for this one
most here have not bothered with pre made bandages and use some kind of tape
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Try Liquid bandages, AKA "New Skin" I believe. Hurts on initial contact due to alcohol content, but does a nice job on superficial scratches/cuts...
On Tuesday, May 15, 2018 at 3:14:58 PM UTC-4, Electric Comet wrote:

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Well, if the splitting of the skin at the nail edge/tip means I have advanced heart disease then I've been going downhill since I was 11 YO (now 67) and it first was noticed... Thanks for the info though. Regards, Pat
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On Sun, 13 May 2018 06:07:13 -0700 (PDT), patrick
One of my coworkers has had that for as long as he can remember. If he has heart trouble I want the same heart trouble--he runs 7 miles every morning before work and climbed Everest a few years back.
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On Sun, 13 May 2018 09:24:58 -0400, J. Clarke

You might want to reconsider. Remember Jim Fixx? It's not unusual and in fact, runners have *more* heart issues than those, who are active but not distance runners. It's known that runners have a higher instance of AFib, for instance, than the general population. A few of tons of articles.
<https://www.runnersworld.com/newswire/heart-risk-marathoners-have-larger-plaques-in-arteries <https://www.active.com/articles/new-study-cites-link-between-marathon-running-and-some-heart-attack-factors
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On Sunday, May 13, 2018 at 6:40:00 PM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

What a subject. I'm in a quandry at 68. I still feel great and I'm not going to worry about living a short or long life. I'm more worried about becoming a miserable old f.than going out a happy younger one. Maybe it's going to be a fatal flaw but I haven't been for a checkup for 10 years and have no plans to do so for another 10. My grandparents went this route and quit smoking in their 50's . I quit in my 30's they all drank a shot of brandy or bourbon a while before bed , which I practice. They lived into their mid to late 90's My folks were tied into the medical system with vials of pills and daily pill box doses. My mom started in her 50's and lived to 63. My dad didn't start the pill thing until his late 70's and then he had every ailment under the sun until and passed at 87. I must admit my generation and the younger ones have had a lot more crap chemicals in our food most of our lives. While yhe 80-100 year olds have not had as much, maybe. Who knows it's a crap shoot . So I just shoot for happy and let nature take it's course . O.K.,so I'm foolishly happy for now! rick B.
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On Sun, 13 May 2018 17:05:35 -0700 (PDT), Rick the antique guy

Maybe it'll work out for you but I tried it, until I retired (the first time) in '06 (age 54). Didn't work for me. Right after, I had a rather severe run-in with A-Fib and heart failure. Got over that hump fairly well, lost a lot of weight and was doing alright (but seeing Drs regularly). Then in '14 the A-Fib came back and they found four blocked coronary arteries (70%, 90% and two 100%), so had a CABG/MAZE. After the A-Fib got a lot worse (even though the whole purpose of the MAZE procedure was to stop it). In the last two years I've had three left-atrial ablations for atypical A-flutter, a carotid artery angiogram (another scheduled later this year), a fractured pelvis, and an AV node ablation with pacemaker (but I've been fine for the three months since ;-).
Getting old isn't for sissies. ...but it does beat the alternative.
I hope pretending that doctors don't exist works out better for you than it did me. ;-)
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