PEX For Shop Air Lines?

My son bought me a 50' retractable air hose for Christmas. I plan to hang it in my attached garage where it will get the most use. However, I also use my portable air compressor in my shop, which is in the basement.
I've been reading and watching videos about using PEX as air lines in home workshops and even in some commercial settings. If I ran PEX from the garage to the shop, I could leave the compressor in the garage and have easy access to air (and more room) in the (small) shop.
The only downside that I heard mentioned was moisture collecting in the PEX.
Is this something that I really need to be concerned with? If moisture is really an issue in PEX, isn't it an issue in the retractable hose also? In *any* hose in fact?
If it is an issue, would clearing the line by attaching an air gun nozzle before using a nail gun eliminate any moisture concerns?
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On 12/26/18 9:42 AM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Have you thought of putting in an in-line moisture filter/trap?
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On Wednesday, December 26, 2018 at 12:31:32 PM UTC-5, -MIKE- wrote:

I thought about, but I'm trying figure out if one is really needed.
People don't use a moisture trap when they haul their portable compressors to job sites and use the e.g. 20' black hose that came with compressor, do they? When is a moisture trap needed?
If needed, what price-point would I be looking at for a 150 PSI compressor? I'm not trying to build an industrial strength system, just something for a small shop. Occasional nail gun use, nozzles for clean up, tire fills, etc.
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I drain the large tank in my wood shop, regularly, and especially when spra ying finishes.
I've never had a moisture issue with my smaller portable tanks (upholstery shop), I have 2, nor in the hoses. As to your nail/staple guns, oil them r egularly.... that should be sufficient to prevent any moisture issues with them. I've had one small tank for about 5 yrs and the other about 2 yrs. There are no moisture traps on the small tanks, as there is on the large w ood shop tank.
I've occasionally used a small tank for spraying a finish, with no moisture issues, yet. *Sidenote: I suspect the regulators on the Harbor Freight sm all compressors are not accurate, re, spraying requiring a certain pressure (about 40 psi). I regulate to about 50 psi for my best results with my sp ray equipment on these small tanks. Your results may vary.
I wasn't aware the type of moisture trap has a psi rating or requirement. It's the tool rating (maximum) that's important, as for as I know.
Sonny
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On 12/26/2018 2:06 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

A moisture trap is needed when moisture sprays out the end of the house into your tool. All of the moisture is from the moist/humid air outside of your compressor being sucked in, heated, and going into a cool tank. The moisture from the air will condense inside the compressor. If you run the compressor enough to begin heating up the compressed air in the tank you will begin to see the moisture being blown out of the end of the hose.
Moisture separators are CHEAP, just add one near the compressor but before you airline.
OR leave the compressor drain line open so that it constantly leaks a little bit, enough to keep up with the condensation that forms inside the tank.
With that said, is PEX going to be adequate for high pressure air?
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On 12/26/2018 2:56 PM, Leon wrote: ...

See ASTM F877 for PEX tubing.
Most box store PEX tubing will be rated 160 psi at 73°F but drops to 100 psi @ 180°F.
It's a little close on rating in my book at 150, but more than likely there's some safety factor in play but I don't have any specifics in that regards.
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On 12/26/2018 3:58 PM, dpb wrote:

I know the stuff is pretty good, and can expand IIRC up to 10%. My house pressurized plumbing is all PEX. I was just wondering if PEX, besides having enough pressure resistance, would pose any other danger like the PVC stories you hear about. It being relatively pliable I would imagine it would simply fail but not fly apart into pieces.
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wrote:

I was going to say, CPVC is used for water too but definitely _NOT_ advised for air. Personally, I wouldn't use either.
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On 12/27/2018 11:08 AM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

I agree, mainly because plastic becomes weak and brittle when exposed to UV light. Not a big concern inside a house, in walls with little sun light, but why fool with it. Of course, I recall my kids had plastic swing sets and toys, forget the name, but they were indestructible. Most ever happened to them was some color fading.
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I believe that those ratings are working pressure, not burst pressure, but I haven't sprung the 50 bucks or so for F877 so I may be mistaken.
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On Wednesday, December 26, 2018 at 3:56:49 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

That might work if the drain was on the bottom of the compressor. That is not the case with the very common Porter Cable 6 gallon pancake model. Not only is the drain located up the curved side of the tank a few inches, they neglected to center it between 2 of the 3 legs. You have to tilt the unit up onto one leg and then balance it at a specific angle to get it to drain.
It would take some type of angled stand to position the unit so that drain was always at the lowest point. Any idea of these things would mind running at an angle? Overall vibration could be dealt with via some secure strapping, but I wonder about the connection points of the compressor unit at the tank. Hanging/running at a weird angle may not have been designed into the unit.

Home Depot PEX is rated at 160 psi. That's higher than the max the compressor can put out. I don't think I'm concerned about that.
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On 12/26/2018 5:11 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Ah, got'cha. Leave it to PC to add a drain but not one that works like it should. It would probably cost and extra dollar or so, during manufacture, to add a small tube to the inside of the drain valve that reaches down to the bottom of the tank.

If it is oilless it should not matter. If it uses oil as a lube there could be complications if run at an angle. Most of the time construction guys just have them sitting around on an uneven surface but probably not at the angle necessary to keep thank drained.

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wrote:

Likely not PC but the chinese sweat-shop that builds the darn things. PC just puts their labels on them, and they are too cheap to either do proper quality control or to buy a slightly higher priced unit.
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wrote:

And too cheap to actually engineer a proper one for the Chinese re-education camps to make.
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On 12/27/2018 7:45 PM, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

+1
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On Thursday, December 27, 2018 at 10:38:17 AM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

I've gotta ask you to explain that one to me.
This isn't the PC compressor I'm talking about, but the location of the drain is the same, i.e. up the side a few inches.
https://images-na.ssl-images-amazon.com/images/I/41NH6dLMTYL._SL500_AC_SS350_.jpg
How would adding a tube from the drain valve to the bottom of tank help?
It's not like there's any suction at the valve to draw the water up the tube. The unit has to be tilted to drain it. Once the unit is tilted to drain, all the water will move to the then lowest point and the tube would actually *block* the drain.
Am I missing something with your suggested tube placement.
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On Fri, 28 Dec 2018 17:32:06 -0800 (PST), DerbyDad03

You ARE missing something. If a line from the inner side of the drain valve reaches to the bottom of the tank, when you open the drain air pressure acting on the water will force it out the drain valve.
Mark the position of the drain valve. Temove it and solder a tube into the valve, bent so it will reach the bottom of the tank at the center of the tank, Feed the line into the hole then tighten the valve to it's original position to put the end of the tube at the bottom of the tank. VOILA!!! a drain that actually WORKS - for a few cents worth of materials and about half an hour's work (if you are slow)
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On Saturday, December 29, 2018 at 12:06:51 AM UTC-5, Clare Snyder wrote:

Ok, thanks.
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On 12/26/2018 2:06 PM, DerbyDad03 wrote:

Just to add a little more, the more air you move through the compressor in a relative short amount of time will determine if you will have a moisture issue.
If you are using a nail gun occasionally you should have no problem Nail guns are high pressure and very low volume users. Your compressor will not be running constantly.
On the other hand, filling a flat automobile tire or blowing your shop out for clean up is a very high volume operation and will promote moisture issues more quickly.
The longer it takes for you to use enough air to trigger a recharge of pressure the better. The hotter the compressor runs the more moisture will be extracted from the air.
If is is raining outside, when running the compressor, or if you live in a humid environment you will more likely have to deal with moisture.
just put one of these on your compressor and be done with the wonderment of it all.
$5.99
https://www.harborfreight.com/catalogsearch/result/index/?dir=asc&orderScore%2Cf%2CEAFeatured+Weight%2Cf%2CSale+Rank%2Cf&q=compressor+water+seperator
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On Wednesday, December 26, 2018 at 4:11:19 PM UTC-5, Leon wrote:

Thanks for the info, but...
That separator is rated with a working pressure of 90 psi. While I don't usually run at anything more than that, my regulator goes up to the max of the compressor's range (150 psi) which makes running it at the max possible.
Wouldn't shrapnel be a concern? "Weakest link" and all that, if you know what I mean.
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