dead on the job and no one noticed

caught wind of a story where a guy went to repair the roof at a walgreen store and died while up there
no one noticed and they forgot he was there
apparently they found his truck in the lot after a few days
if i did a job like that i would check in with the manager and tell them i will check out so they know
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On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 19:22:38 -0700, Electric Comet

Sadly it appears either Stormy did not make the arrangements, or the Walgreens employees did not follow through. Although Stormey wasn't always the sharpest pencil in the drawer, I'm betting on the Walgreens staff totally missing the boat on this one. Might not have saved his life, but would have meant the corpse wasn't up on the roof 3 or 4 days before being found.
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On Sun, 16 Apr 2017 19:22:38 -0700, Electric Comet

Whoever is on staff when you get there may not be when it is time to leave. Often they do no pass on the information in any event.
As to other employee's most wouldn't even be aware of what you were doing or why unless it affected them directly.
If the guy worked for himself then only his family would care, if he had any. If he was an employee then his service manager would have checked up on him. Unless it was over a weekend or was an unscheduled call.
Typically for stores like that the store manager is a non-professional person who just rose through the ranks simply due to employee turnover.
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On 4/16/2017 11:29 PM, OFWW wrote:

Well, anyone that is being paid is a professional. But I agree with the jest. He was not groomed for the position.
Concerning the dead guy, something should not have smelled right. ;~)
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wrote:

Point taken.

Yeah, didn't think of that, the HVAC intake should have picked up the odor and spread it around.
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Can't speak for Walgreens but my two partners and I did considerable maintenance and repairs for Eckerds [now CVS] in the late 90s and beyond. All the store managers we ever dealt with started as pharmacists.
Dave in SoTex
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On Monday, April 24, 2017 at 9:47:08 PM UTC-4, Dave in SoTex wrote:

If you had gone up on the roof of an Eckerds (now CVS) and died while you were up there, would you have been left there for a couple of days or were procedures in place to keep track of maintenance workers?
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On Tue, 25 Apr 2017 16:24:11 -0700 (PDT), DerbyDad03

Since I did commercial and industrial HVAC, few retail stores ever cared about checking, if any. There was never any routine for checking, and unless you killed an A/C unit to service and it got hot in the Pharmacy, they would care less, or the managers office. :)
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On 4/17/2017 12:29 AM, OFWW wrote:

Chris was single so no family to look for him. He was an independent so no service manager to look for him.
Chris Young was a heating refrigeration guy, locksmith, general handywork. Death was from cardiac arrest. Not sure of his age, but he was 50ish. Overall nice guy that did a lot of work for seniors for cheap. Sad way to go.
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Thanks for the inside info. Makes sense.
Knew of an HVAC guy here who was working in a crawl space attic and had a heart attack there, the customer heard him through the ceiling and called fire rescue, and while I can't remember how they got him out, I think it was through the ceiling. Fortunately the story happened happily with full recovery.
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On Mon, 17 Apr 2017 14:21:13 -0400

that is true and sounds too young
after a few days i would guess that cause of death might be difficult to determine
maybe they will change how they handle contractors and repair people
not exactly what you want your store to be known for
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On Mon, 17 Apr 2017 19:36:28 -0700, Electric Comet

Dead is dead. Nothing the store could do other than escort the serviceman while he was there, or install cameras to watch the roof and everything, then have someone monitoring the camera's. Then what, have the escort be a certified EMT? Just in case?
No reason for changing anything other than perhaps the store managers awareness of on site personnel.
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You pose totally ridiculous "solutions" - then say nothing can be done .. Duh. Let's hope you are never in charge of worker safety - especially any young workers who are too green to challenge you. 1. working alone in a hazardous job / location 2. check-in / check-out daily or more 3. communication checks from job site
These are just a quick few topics of conversation for the investigators to consider - and recommend improvements. John T.
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On 4/18/2017 12:18 PM, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

I think he was commenting about the customers of the serviceman. They are not in charge of monitoring work safety guidelines.
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On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 13:18:56 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

Having worked in the industry I am fully aware of what goes on. Yes, the ridiculous solutions were just that, and costly as well. Also I have worked at sites who had roof top cameras for security reasons and the guards monitored them.

Checking in/out is the workers responsibility, and they usually do so that the customer is kept abreast of the work done or being done.
It is the managers responsibility for all the rest. I have worked on stores just like what was described, and know their various shifts, using part time workers, etc.
Workplace safety is high on my list, especially given the scenarios of drug usage affecting work safety.
I'd guess that my personal experience in this area far outstrips anything you have done or have experience with, and I know what works and what doesn't. We are all responsible for our own safety and well being. And yes, when working as the boss of others I am aware of State, Federal, City, County and union requirements.
You would probably not fit in as an employee.

What investigators? This isn't the first case of its type. and you don't know the half of it. Plus this guy was evidently an independent working for himself, and more than likely cut a few corners of his own in order to maximize his earnings.

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On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 13:18:56 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@ccanoemail.ca wrote:

Not the customer's issue.

That'll help a lot with a heart attack. So he's only dead a day instead of three. So what?

Not the customer's issue.

None would have saved his life. Anything else is just a waste of time.
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On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 21:35:38 -0400, snipped-for-privacy@notreal.com wrote:

Actually, it can be. I wouldn't bet on the labour board totally absolving you of responsibility

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How sad to see this humble blue collar man's death become a shit storm of p ontificating bullshit.
Ed is the only one that has noted the sadness of this man's passing.
I think of so many one/two man companies I work with that have service guys that are divorced, their kids are grown or moved away, and yet they still get up every day and do something useful without prompting. The could easi ly be Chris King on any given day.
I work about 40 to 50% of the time on homes and small commercial sites that have no one at home, no one to check in with, and I climb on roofs to do e stimates, work on roofs for repairs, go high on ladders to examine repairs and take pictures for reports, etc. Sometimes I never see my clients, we j ust email and text. It was strange at first being a completely one man show that is responsible for every aspect of the work from estimating to comple tion. Doing that for a couple of decades though, you get used to it. I re alize that I could be hurt (and have been) badly when there is no one to he lp. Poor Chris was doomed, and going to work that day, doing that job was his undoing.
Seeing this thread about what could have/should have/ought to have been mak es me glad I don't work that much with others. The guy is dead for crying out loud. He was just making a living. And apparently (after reading a bit ) he died the way he lived, he just went away. He didn't seem like the guy that expected much out of life from what I read, but as pointed out was th ere to help others.
If only you guys had been there to advise him and the people around him on how to act, what to do professionally, and how to interface with the world, letting him know of his shortcomings and personal responsibilities. With this kind of advice, he might have jumped off the damn roof.
It seems that these threads of bickering self righteousness get at least 10 X the interest than any wood working thread do these days.
Robert
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On Wednesday, April 19, 2017 at 3:55:52 AM UTC-4, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

pontificating bullshit.

ys that are divorced, their kids are grown or moved away, and yet they stil l get up every day and do something useful without prompting. The could ea sily be Chris King on any given day.

at have no one at home, no one to check in with, and I climb on roofs to do estimates, work on roofs for repairs, go high on ladders to examine repair s and take pictures for reports, etc. Sometimes I never see my clients, we just email and text. It was strange at first being a completely one man sh ow that is responsible for every aspect of the work from estimating to comp letion. Doing that for a couple of decades though, you get used to it. I realize that I could be hurt (and have been) badly when there is no one to help. Poor Chris was doomed, and going to work that day, doing that job wa s his undoing.

akes me glad I don't work that much with others. The guy is dead for cryin g out loud. He was just making a living. And apparently (after reading a b it) he died the way he lived, he just went away. He didn't seem like the g uy that expected much out of life from what I read, but as pointed out was there to help others.

n how to act, what to do professionally, and how to interface with the worl d, letting him know of his shortcomings and personal responsibilities. Wit h this kind of advice, he might have jumped off the damn roof.

10X the interest than any wood working thread do these days.

+1
Nuff said.
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On 4/19/2017 3:55 AM, snipped-for-privacy@aol.com wrote:

Well stated.
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