Yawn, another meter question

They are being advertised on TV as saving electricity. Now we all know that adverts are all accurate and never lie. But how exactly do they save electric? Or do they mean that customers can use the information given to save it?
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On Sun, 19 Aug 2018 07:36:31 +0100, Broadback

That's what I understand. TPTB expect you to look at the meter every few minutes and run around switching off lights, phone chargers etc to save a few watts. My impression is that most people pretty soon get bored by them and stop looking, presumably reverting to their former wasteful or otherwise behaviour.
--

Chris

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On 19/08/18 07:43, Chris Hogg wrote:

Yeah. Save £40 something per annum, allegedly - having a larf there. Try getting a wife and daughter (let alone yourself) to change habits for an extended time. We all are used to consuming electricity, gas and water in the manner to which we have become accustomed. Only when these resources are unavailable will we change.
Maybe the reason for establishment encouragement of smart meter adoption is so they can cut off supply to force prevention of resource waste. Family X is consuming 1% more electricity/gas/water than the average for their type - click, fixed.
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On 19/08/2018 08:19, Richard wrote:

I believe that the official figure has been revised to something like £15 per annum. However the cost of the smart meter, for which you are paying for in your bills, has to be factored in. Various recent estimates put the cost of a smart meter at £400 per household.
--
mailto : news admac myzen co uk

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On 19/08/18 09:14, alan_m wrote:

£15? That's a short evening down the pub buying your own...
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wrote:

That’s bullshit. I decided that it was mad to be pissing so much against the wall with heating in the winter and changed to pissing much less against the wall in winter, and that resource continued to be available.

Just another utterly silly conspiracy theory.

Just another utterly silly conspiracy theory.
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In the good old days of electro-mechanical meters there was a nice big wheel which you could monitor go around. You could see or measure what happened when you put the kettle on, or as one did in those days, switched on the electric heater. Which was all fine and dandy but it didn't give alternatives to boiling the water or from being cold so even in those days no money was actually saved.
--
AnthonyL

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On Sunday, 19 August 2018 13:11:35 UTC+1, AnthonyL wrote:

Modern meters have a flashing LED. Flashes once per watthour.
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Must be me, but how would any meter persuade me to switch off lights etc I didn't need? Unless of course you make a habit of leaving things on when not needed. And can't for the life of me see how a fancy meter would change that.
--
*A fool and his money are soon partying *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Sun, 19 Aug 2018 15:19:06 +0100, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I think the whole "smart meter" crap was busted when someone asked if they save electricity, why not use them for water, and save water. The only reason that makes sense is if they don't save electricity.....
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Would probably be more effective with water especially in times of shortage.
--
bert

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On Sunday, 19 August 2018 07:36:34 UTC+1, Broadback wrote:

Their ultimate real purpose is energy demand management, in the new world of renewable energy.Tariffs will be instantly adjustable depending on electricity available. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_demand_management
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On 19/08/18 08:54, harry wrote:

Not quite. instantly adjustable up, long-delayed down. Just like power supplies and petrol/diesel at present.
That is an interesting Wiki article, though. I thought the examples (<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Energy_demand_management#Examples>) were particularly informative, and a bit worrying: "The utility companies in the state of Queensland, Australia have devices fitted onto certain household appliances such as air conditioners or into household meters to control water heater, pool pumps etc. These devices would allow energy companies to remotely cycle the use of these items during peak hours."
What is the point of having an air conditioner (or heater in cold climates) if the electric company decides they will switch it off? It would be bad enough not owning an air conditioner in a heatwave, but actually having one and just sitting there watching it do nothing because someone else is controlling it would be especially galling.
--

Jeff

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On Sun, 19 Aug 2018 11:47:33 +0100

This is quite common in the States for A/C. For a reduced cost rate, there is the option for the utility company to shut off the A/C power for a period of time. In all the time we had this, we never noticed it being switched off, so it was either for a short enough duration to be un-noticeable, or was never invoked.
--
Davey.

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Particularly if you have a resident whose body temperature control is not very effective and would suffer extreme distress without said air conditioning.
--
bert

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writes

There are no such people and they are free to pay more for an unswitched service anyway.
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Rod Speed wrote:

There are susceptible people who die in heatwaves that would not with air conditioning
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writes

Sure, but not for that reason and they are free to pay more for an electricity supply that is never cut in a heatwave.
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On Sunday, 19 August 2018 11:47:35 UTC+1, Jeff Layman wrote:

They won't switch it off. They will (treble?) the price of electricity it there is a shortfall in supply.
The YOU will turn it off. Or your computer will.
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And you call this progress?

--
bert

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