Wood side strip not bonded to acrylic bath

Hi,
just unpacked our Homebase cheap and cheerful acrylic bath.
One long wooden strip is not bonded to the side of the bath.
Both ends and the other side seem to be bonded fine.
Even though this will be on the wall side, it has the feet and wall fixing brackets screwed to it so it looks to me as though this could cause major problems.
Just posting in case this is not a problem; don't think so though.
I have fitted an acrylic bath before, and AFAIK all the wood was bonded.
[It flexed alarmingly before I fitted it, but once screwed down with the edges resting on battens it has been solid as a rock.]
I am now facing taking the suite back and (because HomeBase don't normally hold them in stock AFAIK) either waiting another few weeks (but without a bath) or getting a refund and buying one from B&Q.
A very dusty and grubby (and unlikely to be bathed)
Dave R
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You could bond it with some fibreglass resin perhaps?
Bob
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<snip>
Bob
Thanks for the suggestion.
However I am not willing to spend money to repair a brand new product.
Furthermore if a repair was attempted I wouldn't be able to return it if the repair was unsuccessful.
If there is one manufacturing fault, there may be others; another possibility is that the bath has been crushed during transport and this has sprung the wood loose.
Whatever, I paid for new goods and they appear to be faulty.
Just double checking that it is a major problem.
Cheers
Dave R
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David W.E. Roberts wrote:

All goods from B & Q and Bathstore are by definition faulty.
If you want a good product pay double.

Its not. Its cheap shite that you saved pence on and it will cost you pounds - even just the hassle of getting it swapped - to fix. And teh finished result will styll be shite.
These are not finished products, they are kits of most of the bits you need to build a satisfactory bath. Now go out and get the wood framing you need, and glue it to the bath. Your mission is to somehow support an utra thin shell of glass and resin so it feels like it really is a 450 10mm thick moulded resin bath. Instead of the 199 heap of wombat turds that it really is., It can be done for a lot less than 250, so think of it that way.

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David W.E. Roberts wrote:

Oh don;t be such a wuss.
Do what I do with EVERY 'acrylic' bath. Get 20 meters of 2x2, cut it up and use car body filler (P38 type two pack) to attach it to stiffen the bath up. You can reattach the flaky bit at the same time.
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fixing
major
normally
a
If you bothered to read the start of the thread you would see that I have fitted a 'budget' bath in the past.
I didn't need body filler, extra wood, or anything else.
It is in and solid as a rock.
If you get one without faults, it will be fine.
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