Why are stairlifts so slow?

Actually this question has come up before. The reason I was given many years ago now, was inertia. IE if it went up fast, it would jolt at the start and end of the run. And if you made it slow down and speed up, then it would probably still take a long time as the distance travelled in the main is a short one, and people are heavy loads to move. I guess one could make a three point seat belt system but by the time you have done it up and undone it, you might as well have been going slower anyway! On the other hand, a commode mounted on a Chairlift might be a good product to make. grin. Brian
Reply to
Brian Gaff (Sofa)
Probably stair lifts have weak motors geared down. To match the speed of a person walking up, the motor would have to be more much more powerful to create short acceleration and deceleration stages at start and finish. A faster middle speed would then be a doddle.
Reply to
Dave W
Because most people have become pussified snowflakes, unwilling to accept modest risk.
But people have become incredibly illogical too.  Ever notice all the obese people wearing masks?  Apparently it never occurred to them that being obese was more of a threat than the Wuhan virus?
If they are so afraid of dying, why don't they change their diet and lose some weight? The evidence is clear, metabolically healthy people are largely unaffected by the Wuhan virus.
Reply to
Grumpy Old White Guy
A person walking up stairs is probably no more than 50W.
lets say 80kg doing 2 meters of stairs in what - 10 seconds if elderly.. so 16 kg m per second. ~ 160W? Gosh that's actually quite a lot.
Anyway 160W intermittent is a $5 permanent magnet motor running off 12V or so. Sort of thing that runs your car windows, Or wipers
Reply to
The Natural Philosopher
I imagine economics comes into play also. I small motor geared down is cheaper than a larger, more powerful motor.
-dan z-
Reply to
slate_leeper
Agreed. Although in the case of the stairlift, at any speed you are safe due to the supplied belt. If you don't use it, your fault not theirs, so no compensation claim, nothing for them to worry about. And they could even make it disable the motor if you don't fasten the belt.
Agreed. Although I've seen nobody in the UK wearing a mask, we don't bother.
Agreed. When a fat person says they have a medical problem, I just say "Eat. Less. Food." You don't need to change your diet, just eat less of it. Or go for a run or something, it's not rocket science.
Reply to
Commander Kinsey
Depends on the make, if your stairs have corners, how many steps, etc, etc. A minute is close enough. And 37 seconds is still way too much, considering an able bodied person can walk up those stairs in something like 5-10 seconds without running.
Reply to
Commander Kinsey
It's not just toilets. Imagine you're an infirm person upstairs. The doorbell rings. You take quite a few minutes to get there, by which time they've left. Now you've missed your parcel and are expected to go collect it from the post office.
Reply to
Commander Kinsey
Electric motors have 100% torque at stall.
I am pleased to see that you at least know the difference between a motor and an engine. There is hope for you yet.
Reply to
Xeno
Because the bedrooms are the least accessed room. Makes sense to put kitchen, lounge, bathroom downstairs to reduce the number of times you go up and down the stairs.
Reply to
Commander Kinsey

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