Transferring files, folders and programmes to new computer

I have a new-to-me computer, running W-7 64 bit. My existing computer runs W-7 32 bit. I want to copy all the files, folders and programmes to new computer so that it looks much like the old one. There are already some programmes and files on the new computer that I don't want overwritten or lost, IOW I want to _add_ the contents of my old computer, rather than just making a direct clone.
Can anyone recommend suitable software? I see programmes such as PCmover and Zinstall look as if they would do the job, but has anyone got experience of them? Both computers have wireless links to a common BT hub. Can the transfer be done via the hub, without a wired link?
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Chris

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What a palaver! Why does one need a 'program' simply to copy files, surely you just network the two machines and copy the files. For data files they live in your 'home' directory. Program files may be a bit messier and, anyway, as you're moving from 32-bit to 64-bit the executables will (probably) be different so you'll need to [re]install from scratch I'm afraid.
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Chris Green
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wrote:

What a palaver! When setting up a new Mac here, it will ask if I want to transfer settings, programs and data from another machine (various ways are offered to do that), and if I say yes, then it does it. Some software here has been through several such copies and continues to run without a hitch as it did on the machine it was originally installed on, some generations ago.
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Presumably the two Macs *do* have to be networked somehow though! :-)
Once you have both machines connected to the same network so they can 'see' each other and know each others' names then I don't see a lot of difference.
What would happen if moving between Macs running different architectures?
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wrote:

Well clearly. Here SWMBO and I have our own machines, there's another acting as file server, and the printer, all on the LAN.
If I get a new machine I plug in onto the LAN and then turn it on. At some point the OS will ask whether I want to transfer everything from another machine and provide a list of those available. I pick one and it copies all users, their settings, files, applications, application support files, etc to the new machine. Once that's done I just get on and use it, nothing else needed.

The difference is that you wouldn't see a thread like this one in the Mac ng's because it wouldn't be needed.

What d'ye mean by "different architectures"? If you mean 32/64 bit, then up to now that's not been an issue, as both have been supported for the last several years. Next year they'll drop support for 32-bit altogether, so I just got Office 2016 to replace Office 2008 (which latter is an example of an app that's now been transferred a couple of times from one machine to another without losing a beat).
If you mean PowerPC vs. Intel, it's 13 years since that happened and about 6 OS versions ago. Even that had little impact, they supplied an on-the-fly translator so you could continue to run the old apps. Eventually support for that was removed since under those circs you have to have two copies of all libraries, etc, but they tend to wait until most apps have had new versions for a while to give time for the transition.
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On Sat, 12 Jan 2019 17:38:42 +0000, Tim Streater

Aww bless.
No, you would get the 'I've just upgraded my OS and now some of my apps won't run and it tells me they are no longer supported.
Or the fairly recent hardware that won't run the latest version of OSX?
I just installed W10 on a laptop that came with XP and *everything* ran ok straight away.
Yes, OSX (and Linux) is generally better (than Windows) re the ability to simply copy programs across, assuming you can get the programs for OSX or Linux in the first place that is.
I was also able to install W10 on an old MacBook that wouldn't take (anything like) the latest version of OSX. Go figure. ;-(
Cheers, T i m
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On 12/01/2019 17:52, T i m wrote:

Yup had the SIL phone me in a panic because she had allowed her Mac to update itself to a new (minor) OS version, and then found that none of her Adobe creative suite would run. She had publishing deadlines looming and the only way she could fix it in a hurry was to go buy a later version of CS for £1300! (needless to say she told me all this after the fact when it was too late to do much about).

Apple help get round that by making such shonky laptops you need to buy a new one every 18 months anyway ;-)
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On Sat, 12 Jan 2019 22:02:28 +0000, John Rumm

Feck! ;-(

The MacBook I was given to play with was melted, cracked and distorted ... yet was probably pretty 'expensive' when new and I understand such failings aren't unknown with the range.
It's currently running W10 and Linux as the OS it was designed for is way too limited nowdays.
This s/h Mac Mini has been ok, considering, even running XP. The stupid slot drive failed years ago and I've not bothered replacing it.
I love the way the 'MacBoys' insist that the slot drive was ok because 'no one' ever uses mini cd's these days. Yet I'm still getting kit that has drivers and software that comes on such.
Maybe if you just use your computer as a typewriter ...
I wonder if there is any correlation between those who support Apple, voted Leave and like cats? ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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On 12/01/2019 22:02, John Rumm wrote:

The change from XP to Vista/W7 broke significant programs such as some versions of Autocad. The options were then buy a new package at megamoney or pay for a 3rd party update to the existing Autocad at £300 plus. Apparently Microsoft removed a feature that Autocad relied upon :(
SteveW
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On Sat, 12 Jan 2019 23:09:15 +0000, Steve Walker

Significant but not all that common IRTW?

Then that may have been something unofficial that was bad programming?
The point is, I often download install and run programs where one 'setup.exe' supports Windows from XP to 10 and 32/64.
With Mac you 'more often' find you have to match an older version of the prog with the version of OS ... and that can be even more manual / complicated on Linux and the different OS / Kernel versions / package managers etc. As I said, assuming they actually do a Mac / Linux version of the program in the first place.
Cheers, T i m
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On 13/01/2019 00:20, T i m wrote:

In much of industry, AutoCad is the standard. It is pretty common. Huge numbers of small businesses, that could little afford to upgrade, needed to to retain the ability to read and write AutoCad files for their clients.

No. My recollection is that they removed an entire, documented system, that they'd decided to no longer support.
SteveW
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wrote:

Yes, that’s certainly true. XP was the last of the Wins that attempted to support everything back to DOS. MS gave up on doing that after XP.
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On Sun, 13 Jan 2019 02:05:48 +0000, Steve Walker

Sure, but what percentage of *machines* were running AutoCAD, worldwide?

Whilst you may be right in that instance ... and this sort of thing isn't completely unknown across all OS's, one of the things that has actually held MS back was how it tried to maintain the backward compatibility with older software / hardware.
I am aware also of programmers using undocumented calls and subroutines to then find them broken after an update or upgrade.
In some early OS's you *could* access say the serial port directly and that was how some software makers could secure their programs via the use of a personality module / dongle. Improve the access to that physical port via an intermediate software layer (that improves things for 99.99% of customers) and you are bound to upset a few others.
Cheers, T i m
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On Saturday, 12 January 2019 23:09:19 UTC, Steve Walker wrote:

300

I know someone still running XP for exactly that reason.
Owain
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On Sun, 13 Jan 2019 02:18:34 -0800, spuorgelgoog wrote:

I run XP in an isolated VM for one program that has a 16 bit setup program.
I also run an isolated machine for a program that was never updated past XP.
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Which of course has never happened with any other operating system anywhere in the Universe.
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On Saturday, 12 January 2019 10:48:04 UTC, Chris Green wrote:

I found all my data fitted comfortably on the USB stick I bought for the purpose, so I just moved it that way, and got a backup in the process.
Owain
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Chris Green wrote:

You don't, but you might find files you want are not all in obvious places.

to the point that it's probably not worth trying, copying the obvious files of the program over is just the start, there will likely be extra runtime libraries, and simply copying those isn't enough they need to be registered, then there are registry entries

Yep.
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On Saturday, 12 January 2019 10:48:04 UTC, Chris Green wrote:

When I ran W98 I was surprised to find that a fair percentage of programs ran perfectly if their installed files/folders were simply copied into the program files directory. It saved a good bit of time.
NT
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On Sunday, 13 January 2019 03:36:14 UTC, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Wasn't that *before* MS invoked the abomination that is The Registry?
Owain
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