Tiny Bathroom

My tiny bathroom measures only 190cm x 155cm and comprises a shower cubicle,
a toilet and a basin. I drastically need to update to a clean, smart and
modern design and maximise space, particularly the space in which to shower.
Anyone got any great ideas or have designed such a small space before?
Reply to
Jo
You will probably need to specify placement and size of any windows and doors as this will have a big impact on what works and what does not.
Andrew
Reply to
Andrew May
Depending on where the door is, that's not a particularly small space for a shower room, and there should be plenty of room. We've recently done a really nice shower, toilet and basin setup in not much more than half that area. It could actually be possible in the space you have to fit a bath, separate shower, toilet and basin, although a more spacious setup without the bath is probably preferable. As the previous reply said, position of doors and windows determines what is possible.
A
Reply to
andrew
We have a small shower room and an adjacent toilet, that we're planning to knock together to make a combined shower room and toilet of similar dimensions to yours (224 x 151 cm in fact). There are no windows but two extractor fans, one of which would be removed, and one door would be blocked in. We're going to do away with the old corner shower cubicle and have one end of the room reserved for the shower, with a transparent sliding partition across the full width, dimensions approx. 96 x 151 cm. You could even make the whole thing into a wet room, tiling the walls and floor right through and having a floor drain and no partition, but we're not doing that.
Reply to
Chris Hogg
Modular hotel pods are good examples of how to get things into as small a space as possible.
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Bignell
Reply to
Nightjar
In article , djc wrote:
How's it sealed round the edges, e.g. floor-to-wall? And I assume the underfloor pipes are not insulated, right? Does anyone insulate underfloor pipes? We've got some longish pipe runs to a downstairs loo, and it takes an age to get hot water through. Waste of water and energy, but I wondered what the standard is.
Reply to
Tim Streater
.... As the previous reply said, position of doors and windows determines what is possible.
----------------
And the position of the soil pipe/outlet. You will not want to reposition it for a trivial reason.
Tim W
Reply to
Tim W
Impressive. But I have always wondered. If the point of a 'wet' room is that it all gets wet how do you keep the toilet paper dry?
Andrew
Reply to
Andrew May
In article , snipped-for-privacy@home.again.com says...
Ours isn't much bigger - the extra being more than taken up by the bath as well as the stuff you listed.
Plain white. Pale floor.
Has the advantage of being very cheap, very easy to get right, easy to repair in the unlikely event of damage, and makes it bright and light and airey.
The only downside (oddly not that it's hard to clean, it isn't) but that it's sometimes a bit too bright - if you fancy lounging in a hot bath you'll need to do it with candles or something as the ceiling lights are a bit fierce for relaxing.
Reply to
Skipweasel
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Impressive. But I have always wondered. If the point of a 'wet' room is
IME, you can't, even in much larger ones. Everything's always damp.
Wet rooms are horrid.
Reply to
Huge
In article , andrew_d snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com says...
Shower cap.
Or, just possibly, Bronco toilet paper.
Reply to
Skipweasel
The floor is a wedi fundo tray : 40mm "Styrofoam core coated with a polymer-modified cement coating and reinforced with glass fibre". The walls are similar but 12mm. All the joints were taped with a rubberised sealing strip before tiling. And just in case there is some silicone on the corners. It's been very satisfactory for five years now. The 40mm of insulation underfoot means the tiles never feel cold.
As its in a 2nd floor flat uninsulated pipes are not too much of a worry. If I was doing it again I might do so, but the problem of having to wait for hot water to come through is down to the combi boiler. Insulation might make some difference if the water system was in constant use, but I am out all day, and it is usual for several hours to pass before hot water is needed again.
Reply to
djc
Skipweasel ( snipped-for-privacy@googlemail.com) wibbled on Friday 28 January 2011 17:01:
Lights on a TLC pull cord dimmer - that's what I did - works very nicely :)
Reply to
Tim Watts
How does that work, then? Is the cistern remote from the pan? If so, would it not be as well to have the cistern above head height instead, like in the good old days when you had a pull handle on the end of a chain? Why ever were they done away with?
Reply to
Ronald Raygun
I find that hard to believe, unless you're using undersize parts (for example I understand you can get 150cm long baths, but really nothing under 170cm is worth having unless you're a shortie), or unless you don't think you need much floor space for yourself (over and above the space taken up by the parts).
It could be done, I think, without a separate shower (i.e. mount the shower on the wall above the bath taps, so you're standing in the bath when having a shower), but with a separate shower the figures just don't add up.
The bath (170x70) must go along one long side, wasting 20x70; The shower (80x80) would probably need to go in one of the remaining two corners, wasting 80x5.
This leaves only 110x85 into which to fit a toilet (40x70) and basin (50x40), and enough cruising room to access everything.
Reply to
Ronald Raygun
Tim Streater ( snipped-for-privacy@waitrose.com) wibbled on Friday 28 January 2011 16:45:
Yes - that's one seriously nice piece of work!
Reply to
Tim Watts
In article , snipped-for-privacy@localhost.localdomain says...
No, the sink drains into the cistern to save water.
Reply to
Skipweasel

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