Stump removal

Have 45m run of double staggered Leylandii .... (no I didn't plant them)
Want to remove and plant something better ... I can obvioulsy use s chain saw and cut down to a stump, there seems to be 2 main options to removal of the remainder.
1. Pull out stump with a trefoil such as in this video
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eZjqEC_FWqo
... but how well will that work on 20 yr old Leylandii .... typical diameter between 6 and 8 " .... assume roots will be extensive
2. Hire a stump grinder .... HSS have a 6HP model : http://www.hss.com/hire/p/portable-stump-chipper
or do I need something beefier such as
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tjEhmiLARyw&feature=youtu.be

The trees are on a raised bank about 1.5m above ground behind a 1.2m wall. I can put a ramp to wheel up a 'portable' grinder .... but not something like a bobcat or similar
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On Wed, 10 Aug 2016 12:21:34 +0100, rick wrote:

Try and dig the first one out by hand?
We took down a huge Leylandii when we first moved in and found it to be very shallow rooted so getting the stump and the main roots out was (relatively) easy. This tree was considerably more than 6-8" diameter.
That trefoil looks fun, but does rely on something pretty big as the main post. It also looks to be pulling upwards; I would think that you could tear out most of the stumps by leaving a taller trunk and pulling more sideways.
Another option (depending on access and the potential for collateral damage) would be to hire a mini digger for the day and use the small bucket just to grub them out.
Cheers
Dave R
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On 10/08/16 12:33, David wrote:

Done that with bigger stumps than Leylandii.
Good if you want to get the soil prepped up for replanting
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On 10/08/2016 12:33, David wrote:

Leave about 2 metres of trunk above the ground. This makes it easier to apply some lateral force on the stump. if you cut them to ground level then without a JCB, a stump grinder may be necessary.
Also wait for some heavy rain to soften the soil. Leylandii are notorious for sucking all the moisture out of the soil and leaving it like concrete.
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On 8/10/2016 2:00 PM, Andrew wrote:

If I use a winch that is approach I think might work
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rick wrote:

What's the chance that you destroy the brick wall?
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On 8/10/2016 4:56 PM, Capitol wrote:

By using winch - think I'm OK ... I built wall 1m in front of bank, filled first 1m with stone (& French drain, all wrapped in Terram ... and then soil on top .... trees were in the bank behind .... so hoping majority of root is in the bank. With a winch taking it slowly ... I 'may' be OK
However if people with experience think not then I will go the stump grinder option.
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rick wrote:

How are you getting rid of the cuttings?
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On 8/10/2016 5:10 PM, Capitol wrote:

Probably local recycling centre ... they have skips for green waste
Probably just leave pulled stumps other side of the bank, they can roll down bank till they stop at a tree :-)
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Makes more sense to soak the area with a hose.

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On 8/10/2016 12:33 PM, David wrote:

I could I guess .. but there are more than a 100 of these.

no option on using a digger - no access
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On 10/08/16 12:21, rick wrote:

3. Cut flush with ground with chain or bowsaw. Light fire on top. Leave to smoulder two weeks.
I had some. They are LONG GONE.

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On Wednesday, 10 August 2016 12:41:36 UTC+1, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

If they're sufficiently far from the house the first step can be omitted. They burn nicely.
Owain
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On 8/10/2016 12:41 PM, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Not an option for 100+ trees
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On 10/08/16 16:18, rick wrote:

Now he tells us its 100+ trees and there is no access. chainsaw + light remains.
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On 8/10/2016 4:25 PM, The Natural Philosopher wrote:

I did say in OP that it is "45m run of double staggered Leylandii" which is going to more than 100 trees
and in OP that there is no access for bobcat or similar
So far I have option to try to pull out - but never tried it (hence video link) Or a stump grinder - but may be take a long time - (long hire time)
I just tried eBay ... wow the Tirfor winches go for very high prices .... guess the Landrover market keeps price up.
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rick wrote:

I just can't see pulling these trees out without a lot of ground damage and massive force. I'd cut them off at ground level and settle down to digging holes big enough to plant in, in a single row between the stumps. Laurels have more lateral spread, so you won't need two rows. If desperate, buy smaller plants and use a post hole borer SDS? It'll just take a few more years to establish, but water well and add compost.
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On 8/10/2016 5:08 PM, Capitol wrote: I just can't see pulling these trees out without a lot of ground

I don't want to use Laurels as "is not suitable for seaside gardens" and I live 500m form the sea. I will use either Oleaster – https://www.hedgesdirect.co.uk/acatalog/oleaster.html
Griselinia - https://www.hedgesdirect.co.uk/acatalog/griselinia_littoralis.html
My original idea was to cut them to just below ground level and plant new hedge between - avoid any stump removal (not something I really want to do)....but advice from Hedge suppliers and RHS is that this is unlikely to be successful. You can't plant new hedge close enough ( at least 5 per M) the stump will be in the way ... and the side spread of roots means you will have difficult getting roost of new hedge established.
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On Wed, 10 Aug 2016 20:05:32 +0100, rick

I would say 5 per M is unnecessarily close. That's almost every 8"; ridiculous! Probably recommended in order to sell more plants! When I took out my Leylandii hedge several years ago (see my earlier post in this thread) I replaced it with a single row of Eleagnus ebbingei, planted about 2 per M at the closest (every 18" in old money). Neither the stumps nor roots of the Leylandii got in the way. We live in a very exposed position in West Cornwall, probably a little closer to the sea than you and 300ft up, facing SW and getting the full blast of salty winter gales. Eleagnus ebbingei is excellent in that situation, fast growing and tolerant of those harsh conditions. It's not entirely hardy, but as you're on the coast, it should be OK. Other hedging plants you might consider for coastal exposure as well as the Oleaster (Olearia Traversii, which I also have and is good), are Olearia virgata Laxifolia* (finer leaved than the Oleaster), also fast growing, and Quercus Ilex (Holm oak). Although the Holm oak is capable of reaching tree proportions (as are the Oleaster and Eleagnus if they're allowed to), it can be kept clipped to make a tough seaside hedge.
* http://tinyurl.com/h3e8r2c Nursery just up the road from me 50 5ltr Olearia Laxifolia plants delivered for just £377.08 + VAT Or 15 20ltr Olearia Laxifolia plants delivered for just £327.08 + VAT
Smaller plants will establish better in an exposed site. Almost anything will need staking for the first few years under such conditions.
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45 metres of double row hedge. Doesn't take a genius to work out that that is quite a lot of trees.
Also said that digger access wasn't possible in original post. Time for new reading glasses methinks.
Tim
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