Stud Wall Instruction

Hi all
Does anyone know a good link for building a stud wall? Need info like: Size and type of timber. Plasterboard type/thickness. Spacing of trimmers etc
Want to wall off end of room to make storage cupboard - 3m wall including door access.
TIA
Phil
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Well, plasterboard is 1200mm wide, so you have the choice of spacing the studs at 600mm (cheap and quick) or 400mm (more solid).
Use 75mm x 50mm studwork. You need a footplate of the same material and a top plate over the top. Place either one or two noggins, depending on the height of the wall. Two is probably better, equally spaced between the footer and header.
Attach the studwork using skew nailing. Plasterboard over using 12.5mm plasterboard, either straight edge, scrim taped and skimmed, or taper edged, taped and filled. Use plasterboard screws. Avoid plasterboard nails.
The top of the wall need securing, to stop it wobbling, especially over 3m. How this is done depends on the situation. You may be able to attach to joists in the ceiling above.
Christian.
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On Wed, 2 Mar 2005 10:14:39 -0000, "Christian McArdle"

Whats a footplate/top-plate/noggin ?

Whats skew nailing/scrim tape

Just asking as im new to plasterboard/std wall construction too !!
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-----------------A---- | | | | | | B | | | | | | | | | |------|------|--C---| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | -----------------D----
A = topplate/header B = stud C = noggin D = footplate/footer

Skew nailing is a secure and strong way of making a butt join. Obviously, perfectionists may use proper furniture type joins with mortice and tenons etc, but this is not necessary.
| | / | | / | +--------- |STUD | NOGGIN | | | +--------- | | \ | | \
The diagonal lines represent the nails. By nailing in at 90 degrees to each other, you get a very strong join that wouldn't be the case if all nails were parallel. It is best to predrill the wood, though, especially the clearance hole.
Scrim tape is a fibre backed ultra low tack sticky tape. You cover plasterboard joins with it to prevent or reduce cracking as the boards move naturally.
Christian.
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I prefer this style as its I found it less fiddly to make.
-----------------A---- | | | | | | B | | | | | | | | | | |------| | |------| |--C---| | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | | -----------------D----
| | | | | +--------- | STUD | NOGGIN |-| | | | +---------+ +--------- | | | |-| 2 x NAIL | | +---------+ | | | | |
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Certainly, there is little to object to it. It depends how the noggins are attached, really. With skew nailing it makes no difference, whilst other methods are easier otherwise.
Christian.
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On Wed, 02 Mar 2005 13:07:25 +0000, Christian McArdle wrote:

Just out of interest, what function do the noggins perform? Stiffening the frame or providing more places to screw the plasterboard?
I only ask, because one (at least) of the walls in my last flat didn;t appear to have any, given the ease I pushed a bit of oval conduit up 3/4 of the height internaly to feed a new bathroom mirror-light.
Cheers
Tim
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I'd say the former, although they are useful for the later, particularly when the stud spacing is 600mm.
Christian.
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Christian McArdle wrote:

In which case its better *not* to use the offset noggin method I suggested.
The plasterboard also provides a lot of stiffening too.
BTW, if you really want a stiff wall you can put diagonals in to make a lattice type wall (although I cannot think of a domestic situation where this would be required).
Alex
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It can be required for structural stud walls, where the structural value of the wall is for stability of the house, resisting sideways wind loads, rather than simple gravity load bearing.
Christian.
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Christian McArdle wrote:

Interesting. I had heard you can use them for suspending walls from above too.
Not really a DIY thing though as I would want some indemnity put on the calculations eh?
Alex
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On Wed, 02 Mar 2005 14:13:25 +0000, Christian McArdle wrote:

If it's non structural, can one omit the noggins, because it makes dropping cables down the cavity a lot easier in the future?
Tim
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Tim S wrote:

The wall construction described here *is* non-structural. It is physically possible to omit the noggins (!) but your BCO may have an issue with this.
I would always put noggins in and plan ahead with the wiring.
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Alex W wrote:

BCO is also likely to insist on the space in the cavity being filled with sound insulation of some sort, which also screws up the dropping of cables.
David
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Lobster wrote:

Not in a single dwelling. There is no requirement for sound insulation WITHIN a property to teh best of mu knowledge.
However its occasiuobnally a good thing. So run cables BEFORE you put psaterboard up.

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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

IIRC there is between a WC compartment and a habitable room.
Owain
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Owain wrote:

When discussing inclusion of rockwool under the floor on my loft conversion, the BCO mentioned that although the plans only called up said insulation as a fire precaution if the plasterboard to the existing 1st floor ceiling was less than 12mm, that I would probably need to include it anyway to meet the accustic requirements that were now included in part <letter I can't remeber>. Not sure if this is only applicable with three or more storys, but the impression I got was that this was a general requirement.
(as it happened I was in favour of as much sound insulation as possible given one of the sprogs would be right above our heads!)
--
Cheers,

John.

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The Natural Philosopher wrote:

Well, when I was embroiled in Building Regs Hell about 6-9 months ago - you might have followed some of the saga here(!), when I was advised about some new lack of regs compliance each time the BCO visited over an unrelated matter - the BCO at one point asked whether I had put sound insulation in my internal stud partitions, and when I said 'no' (pillock!), required me to remove all the plasterboards to rectify the situation.
I'm not saying BCO was definitely correct; I think I was probably a bit punch-drunk by that stage. I'd certainly be interested in knowing for sure before I do it again!
David
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Well I can't find it WRT a 2 storey detached single occupancy house. Sometimes I think the BCOs get confused about these rules themselves and end up quoting inappropriate regs.
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Tim S wrote:

Yes, and yes....
There is also a good argument for putting a row of noggins at 1.2m height, and then running the plasterboard horizonatally rather than vertically. That way you can slso stagger the overlaps between top and bottom to add more strength to the wall. The noggins in this case ensure there are never any unsupported plasterboard edges.
--
Cheers,

John.

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