Stuck Euro Profile securing screw

I am having difficulty removing the posidrive screw that holds a Euro Profile cylinder in place. The end of the screw is starting to become damaged.
Anyone had a similar experience?
What would be the best way of removing this screw?
--
Michael Chare

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An impact driver is ideal for removing screws with minimal damage to the slot. But once the slot is damaged, drilling out may be the only route.
--
*Puritanism: The haunting fear that someone, somewhere may be happy.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 22/07/2016 11:00, Michael Chare wrote:

Give it a bit of shock. Put the screwdriver in the head of the screw. Hit the end of the screwdriver with a hammer once or twice. Now see if the screw moves
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mailto: news admac {dot] myzen co uk

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On Friday, 22 July 2016 11:00:45 UTC+1, Michael Chare wrote:

http://wiki.diyfaq.org.uk/index.php/Screws#Removing_a_Damaged_Screw
NT
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On 7/22/2016 1:05 PM, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

Not helpful in your case, but a comment on the DIY FAQ.
This doesn't explicitly mention mole-type wrenches which are IMHO one of the most effective tools for this at least on machine screws, although it does talk about pliers and wire cutters.
The thing about the mole is that you can really graunch it tight, forming a new positive key. And you are separating the "grip" and the "turn" function.
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I'd guess most locks would have flush screws?
--
*Honk if you love peace and quiet*

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 22/07/2016 13:35, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Indeed that is the case. I was going to try a left had drill bit starting with a centre drill bit or maybe get some of these screw extractors:
http://www.screwfix.com/p/screw-extractor-5-piece-set/18643
--
Michael Chare

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On Fri, 22 Jul 2016 14:39:22 +0100, Michael Chare

I've not had to do this on a Euro Lock but have done so on many (machine) screws over the years and that's use a very fine punch to tap the screw round.
This works best when whatever the screw is mounted in is rigid (like an engine block) so whilst your doors is probably 'soft' wood or uPVC, there may be a lock plate over it that could help act as a support.
So, if you still have any screwdriver slot left (whatever the head type), use a fine (1-2mm diameter) and possibly slightly angle tipped punch held at as low an angle you can get and at 90 Deg to the axis of the screw. If you can work a 'key' into the screw (by using the punch to 'cut' a slight slot) and as near to the outside edge as possible then you will get better torque.
Do this from as many different directions as possibly and at least two opposite sides.
I used this technique quite recently on a Stihl crankcase Torx socket screw that had been stripped out because of poor usage (they hadn't cleaned the socket out properly before inserting and using the tool). I was able to cut a slight slot across the top of the screw with a hacksaw (I have often used the Dremel with a cutting disk) and then used the punch to get the screw loose.
Cheers, T i m
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On 23/07/2016 10:11, T i m wrote:

Something like these or can you suggest anything better?
http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/16-Piece-Metal-Punch-And-Chisel-Set-Parallel-Drift-Pin-Brake-Centre-Gauge-Tool-/391054070528?hash=item5b0ca39300:g:eXwAAOSwstxU3SvA
--
Michael Chare

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Michael Chare wrote:

If you haven't got much use for the other punches, just use your least favourite small flatblade screwdriver ...
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On Sat, 23 Jul 2016 15:00:47 +0100, Michael Chare

I'd say 'yes', assuming you haven't already got most of those but even if you only use a couple on this job, it'll be way cheaper than any locksmith. ;-)
So, depending on the room you have around the head of the screw and how deeply it may be countersunk I'd first use the smallest chisel bit across the top left of the screw (say 10 O'clock) and hammering down and left. Depending on how easy it is to hold the door you might even start downwards at 9 O'clock (so you are hitting down the door not across it. Then go over to 3 O'clock and do the same upwards.
If you can't get even the corner of the small chisel on the outer edge of the screw head without digging into the surrounding metalwork, you could try one of the flat punches on the 'edge' you may have just cut with the chisel or a pointed punch at a great enough angle to get it to grip into the screw, rather than slipping off.
Use as big a punch you can (stronger and more rigid) and keep good pressure / grip of the punch against the screw before you give it a tap (to try to stop it slipping).
Assuming you have a bench grinder you could always very gently (so it doesn't get too hot, or quench it regularly in water) grind an angle of about 30 degrees across the end of say the 3rd from right punch to give you a bit more of an 'edge' to bite into the steel.Regular taps in opposite directions should start things going.
If the frame isn't plastic you could try putting a heavy soldering iron on the end of the screw (till you see smoke) as that might release any locking agent used.
It's funny, with experience you learn to choose the right screwdriver for the screw head (although you can still get it wrong first time) and assuming it's not already been mullered by someone else, you can get a feel of what effort might be needed before you turn it, de-cam and do damage (as after that you have an even more difficult job of course).
My go-to crosshead screwdriver is a long Pozi No2 or (and often surprisingly), the x-head bit on my Leatherman PST II.
Good luck!
Cheers, T i m
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On 23/07/2016 17:00, T i m wrote:

Thanks for your advice, the punches were not quite as small as I had imagined, and not quite pointed enough, but the screw came out with just a few taps of the hammer. So thank your very much for your help. Just off to buy a new screw.
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Michael Chare

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If you carefully drill off only the heads of the screws, and remove the lock, there should be enough left of the screw to undo with pliers or a mole grip. Once the screw is no longer under tension, it should come out easily - unless corroded, etc.
--
*If at first you don't succeed, try management *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 23/07/2016 12:19, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I doubt if you can remove an euro cylinder with some of the screw still in place, it wouldn't fit through the hole to extract.
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newshound wrote:

The screws securing euro locks are generally countersunk, which won't help.
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On 7/22/2016 1:49 PM, Andy Burns wrote:

Which is why I wrote
"Not helpful in your case"
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On Fri, 22 Jul 2016 16:35:40 +0100, newshound wrote:

this might work
remove escutcheons on either side with two adjustable spanners grip both ends of the cylinder and break it in half by working it up and down a 5mm hole drilled through the narrow part of the cylinder (where the screw fits ) will make breaking it easier
new cylinder about £20 in B&Q
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On 22/07/2016 19:29, neman nemo wrote:

In my case my son wanted a euro removed that had a broken key in it, I tried everything to loosen the screw to no avail so next stop was to break the lock. One hard hit with a hammer and the lock bent slightly but the screw then just gently screwed out, I didnt manage to salvage the lock though. Ebay may be cheaper for purchasing depending on the level of security you want.
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On Fri, 22 Jul 2016 20:38:15 +0100, ss wrote:

A few years ago I replaced my locks and next doors - they're identcal sizes. Trouble is, the measurements seem to be unusual and not available from SF or any sheds. I had to buy them 'remotely' as it were and was rather nervous about the supplier knowing my address and the numbers on the keys - ebay was not consisdered! I found some good locks of the correct size and then did as much as I could to check the supplier. So far no-one has come in and tidied up out of sympathy :-( I'd have preferred a personal retail purchase so that I was anonymous - bit paranoid I suppose.
--
Peter.
The gods will stay away
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On 23/07/16 07:56, PeterC wrote:

No, not really. I did the same as you a few months ago, replacing all the original eurolocks with antisnap ones.
I guess the company I bought them from over the internet wouldn't last 5 minutes if it became known there were break-ins associated with them (insurance companies share claims data). But they do have the key "code" data, of course, in case I need replacement or extra keys, and my address. Caveat emptor, I suppose.
--

Jeff

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