SDS drill for general DIY?

I want an SDS drill for some work on brick and concrete, but I want one that'll be very good for general DIY as well. I'm considering one from the Metabo range as they have a very good quick change mechanism for swapping the SDS chuck with a conventional one (better than Makita I believe). I first thought I'd get a BHE24 drill but I know they don't have a rotation lock and chiseling might be useful in the future - wish I had one when I was hacking off tiles last year. I then thought I'd get a KHE24 though they're more expensive (rotation and percussion locks, but only one gear), and then I noticed the UHE range are good for screw driving as well with their two speed gear box, but they're the most expensive of all. I'm also concerned that all of these SDS drills might not be good on wood with the percussion stop as I've seen they have lower rotation speeds than normal hammer drills.
Can anyone with SDS experience for general DIY work tell advise me on which one to buy please?
Many thanks,
Ken
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All in one tools are rarely a good idea as they always involve compromise.
Why not just get the SDS of your choice and a basic non hammer mains drill for everything else - they're cheap as chips.
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*You're just jealous because the voices only talk to me *

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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In general, a SDS drill will be much heavier than a conventional hammer drill. This can make it awkward for some tasks.
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The DeWalt 566 is quite light and very well balanced. I use it one-handed all the time almost as one would a battery powered drill.
Highly recommended providing you don't do a Grunff on it :-)
There is also a quite small Bosch (can't remember the number but B&Q have it).
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G&M wrote:

It's funny, since buying my Makita 18V combi, I've only used my Bosch mains hammer drill once - and that was for mixing tile adhesive. It's always either the DeWalt for drilling holes in walls/chiseling etc, or the Makita for everything else.
--
Grunff

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one-handed
Ah but you've got an understanding wife ! :-) For some of us it's an either/or choice.
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G&M wrote:

You bet - she loves the Makita. Really likes the speed control on it.

Ahhh!
BTW, the DeWalt is all fixed, running like new. Took me about 15 mins. I reckon if I had to do it again I could do it in 5. Very nicely engineered machine.
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The spares for my angle grinder were even cheaper, only 6.95 for a complete kit :)
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Ian Stirling wrote:

:-)
I use crappy angle grinders too (for masonry work, keeping my good ones clean for metal work). They are useful, but pretty crap compared to good ones.
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I've actually found that for some tools, the parts can be more valuable than the whole. Just try finding a small gearmotor for 1.99, when you can buy whole screwdrivers for that.
The first really cheap angle grinder that died (5 min operating time) yeilded a gearbox (4:1) that looks ideal to fit to my grinding machine to reduce the speed from a normal motor, as the gearmotor I was using died (crappy plastic gear)
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Grunff wrote:

I would have thought that a good one will stand up to masonary work just fine. As long as the bearings and switch gear are well sealed against the dust they ought to last well. I have a 2kW Hitachi 9" grinder that has done nothing but cut masonary, slabs, roof tiles, concrete paths etc for the last 3 years - still working as good as new.
What is more it actually cost less in real terms than a number of the cheapie options - got it from a local trade supplier (alas now closed it seems) who specialied in Hitachi kit - it was 72 quid but that included about 30 quids worth of diamond disc! (must admit I asked the girl behind the counter to check that the disc really was included in the price!)
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Cheers,

John.

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John Rumm wrote:

Even if this is true, would I really want to get nasty stone/concrete dust on my lovely metal working tools? I might do maybe 1 days worth of masonry work per year, compared to several weeks worth of metal work.
I'd rather use my cheapie grinder for this, keeping my good ones relatively dust free.
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one-handed
I think it is more that at that price you use it to get your moneys worth.
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IMM wrote:

No, you use it because it feels and works so much better. You obviously have no experiance of using decent tools.
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John.

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worth.
No you use it because it cost a fortune to buy.
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IMM wrote:

No, you obviously haven't been following the story. I bought the Makita because I use my cordless drill *a lot*, and they kept failing or performing unsatisfactorily. Remember, you receommended I try the 18V PPPoo, which I did and found to be shit.
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worth.
I also said try the Riyobi and the Wickes (Kress), which you never.
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IMM wrote:

How many times am I supposed to try what you suggest? You suggested the PPPoo first, I tried it, it was shit. Am I supposed to then continue following your suggestions? Please!
I'm *extremely* happy with the Makita. Yes, it cost twice as much as the PPPoo or the Bosch (green), but it's far more than twice the tool. Use one and you'll understand.
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I think your maths is a bit out. More like the Makita cost five times as much as the PPoo but is five times the tool.
( Would love to get the Makita sliding mitre saw but it's just too expensive for my woodworking needs )
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G&M wrote:

Ok, a little off, but not 5x - the Makita 8443 cost 280, including 3x 2.6Ah NiMH batteries (and a pocket TV!). The PPPro 18V combi was 90, but only two batteries and only 1.9Ah at that.

Same here, stuck with a NuTool for now. Works well but is inacurate and very noisy. Fitting a decent blade helped a lot.
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