Sash windows.

Been fixing up some sash windows which are basically about 130 years old. Had a broken glass after what look like a bird it it - or bullet. ;-) And a sash cord.
So decided to replace all the sash cords at the same time, and with new parting and stop beads. So got the type that takes a nylon brush for best draught proofing. And wondered if anyone knows how long the brush is likely to last? It will hopefully stop any rattles too, in a wind.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Thursday, 10 October 2019 19:03:47 UTC+1, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Not as long as the windows :-)
Can you buy spare brush strips and put them away for future use in case the profile becomes unavailable?
Owain
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It comes on a drum, and you fit it to the bead yourself. I got a 100 metre drum. ;-)
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 10/10/2019 19:03, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Make sure the top sash is the outer one, not like this fine example... https://goo.gl/maps/Yxs3qvmEwETNJgYE6
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;-) At least I got that right.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 10/10/2019 19:03, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I've got a lot of sash windows in my holiday flat, which is in a Grade II listed building - so little scope for double glazing.
I've replaced all my beads with the nylon brush type. They have improved noise and drafts to some extent, but not as much as I hoped.
I've also replaced the cord to sash attachments with these https://www.mightonproducts.com/cordclam-cord-retainer which make it a doddle to remove and replace the sashes in future - e.g. for painting. Oh, and the staff beads are screwed rather than nailed on like the old ones - also facilitating easy removal.
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Roger
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I've also used screws for the staff beads. Couldn't think of a similar way to fix the parting beads, though.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Friday, 18 October 2019 16:50:43 UTC+1, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I've found pins make it easier & quicker to remove the beads than screws.
NT
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The snag with nails is one of the four sections has to be removed first. Once this is done, the other three are easy.
But if they are nailed, much more chance of damage to the paint than with screws.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Saturday, 19 October 2019 14:54:03 UTC+1, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

I've no idea what that means. I did try screws on sliding sashes but found it produced far more disruption of paint & difficulty in removal.
NT
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On 18/10/2019 16:46, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

My parting beads don't use any fixings. They are an interference fit in their grooves, and have to be tapped in with a block of wood and a hammer.
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Roger
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That may have been the case here 150 years ago. ;-) The old ones had long panel pins, though.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 20/10/2019 14:36, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

Belt and braces! If you replace them with the furry type, you'll probably find that they're a tight enough fit without needing any pins.
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Roger
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No - they are the same thickness as the ones they're replacing. Which weren't that old anyway. I drilled pilot holes through the new with a pillar drill to make using long panel pins easier.
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Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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