roundabouts

On a fairly open roundabout I can see a car approaching from a road on the right. Given that I will be on the roundabout first who has the right of way? Is the rule give way to traffic on the roundabout or give way to traffic on the right? I see so many cases where because the driver entering the roundabout sees there is no traffic on his right he assumes he has right of way.
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wrote:

The Highway Code doesn't seem to be clear on this, either. In the section on Roundabouts, it says "When reaching a roundabout you should: Always give priority to the traffic coming from the right, unless you have been directed otherwise by signs, road markings or traffic lights"
and so on. https://www.highwaycodeuk.co.uk/changes-and-answers/-highway-code-for-roundabouts#
But it doesn't stipulate whether 'the traffic coming from the right' is actually on the roundabout, about to come onto the roundabout, or approaching the roundabout and fifty yards away.
I guess you have to use your common sense, much like at any road junction, along the lines of 'can I safely get out onto the roundabout before the traffic coming from the right reaches the space I'm about to occupy'.
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Chris

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Also if you are chasing around so fast you cannot stop before hitting the car in front you are either too fast or too close or both! Cyclists seem to think they have priority too, even over poor pedestrians, since if they can at a junction they zoom up the crossing and go onto the footway. Brian
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As far as I'm concerned it's traffic already on the roundabout. Although if some loony is approaching it at 900mph from my right I wooden push the issue.
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Tim Streater wrote:

On the approaches to this roundabout:
http://goo.gl/maps/k1xYx
a barrier has been erected so that you can't see traffic already on the roundabout until the last minute, presumably with the intention of making you approach the give way line more slowly, rather than speeding through if you think it is clear.
Chris
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Chris J Dixon wrote:

Th council here tried a similar trick, presumably it had the opposite effect on accidents as they removed it after a couple of years
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On 13/01/2020 15:50, Andy Burns wrote:

The very large business park that I work on has access from the motorway. The junction serves only the park and a small commercial waste site.
Bushes and trees planted at the top force drivers coming up the slip-road to almost stop, with the result that they are going too slowly to take advantage of gaps in the traffic coming around the roundabout. All the vehicles stopping or nearly stopping causes a tailback, which sometimes trails right back onto the motorway, causing stationary traffic in the first lane.
The stupid thing is that removing the bushes and trees would allow drivers to adjust their speed and slot in (as roundabouts were always intended to be used).
Even worse is that they have just widened the road from the roundabout to the business park to a dual-carriageway, but did not take the opportunity to make the (newly constructed) left lane separate from the roundabout, allowing exiting motorway traffic to flow without hindrance.
SteveW
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On Mon, 13 Jan 2020 21:53:53 +0000, Steve Walker

Was there any history of accidents that would cause the roads authority to introduce measures to reduce traffic speeds? I have seen this done at some roundabouts; I assume because of accident record.
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There are three cases:
- driver on right gets there first: he has priority and you must give way to him
- you and driver on right get there at the same time: he has priority and you must give way to him
- you get there before other driver: you don not have to give way, but should aim to be clear of the roundabout so he can pass behind you without having to brake more harshly than needed for negotiating the curve of the roundabout
There is no obligation *always* to give way to traffic on your right (on the roundabout or about to join) if you will be clear and will not affect them. Consider the case of a car on your right that is 100 yards away from the roundabout as you arrive. You don't have to stop (and it would be bad driving to do so) just because he is visible in the distance; you will have exited the roundabout on the far side long before he even crosses his give-way line.
Obviously there are boundary cases where people cut it very fine and *do* make the driver on your right brake hard to avoid hitting you. On a busy road where I can see traffic queueing to join, I expect that cars might cut it fairly fine even though I have priority over them, and I am prepared to brake harder than normal (and give them a warning hoot!) just in case. Roundabouts don't work well if there is far more traffic going in one direction, such that traffic coming from the left never gets chance to join the roundabout because there is never a large enough gap to do so: that is when peak-hours traffic lights are needed.
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Straight from the highway code
give priority to traffic approaching from your right, unless directed other wise by signs, road markings or traffic lights.
Basically anyone approaching from your right and that might be straight ahe ad on a 3 road roundabout has priority, however you have to make a judgemen t call regards have you time to clear the way before someone approaching fr om the right reaches you. Essentially you should not enter if a vehicle or other means of transport has to brake in order to let you through.
Richard
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On Mon, 13 Jan 2020 04:24:18 -0800 (PST), Tricky Dicky

Quite so. I think it is 'speed or direction' rather than just speed,
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On 13/01/2020 18:16, Scott wrote:

That used to be called velocity in my school day:-)
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On Mon, 13 Jan 2020 18:49:41 +0000, ARW

Indeed. And we were chastised for confusing mass and weight.
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On 13/01/2020 18:53, Scott wrote:

We never mentioned the art teachers mass within ear shot the physics teacher.
She went to mass watchers.
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Velocity includes speed *and* direction.
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On Monday, 13 January 2020 18:49:46 UTC, ARW wrote:

otherwise by signs, road markings or traffic lights.

t ahead on a 3 road roundabout has priority, however you have to make a jud gement call regards have you time to clear the way before someone approachi ng from the right reaches you. Essentially you should not enter if a vehicl e or other means of transport has to brake in order to let you through.

Velocity has speed AND direction.
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On 13/01/2020 11:52, fred wrote:

The requirement for vehicles entering a normal roundabout* is to comply with the legal definition of give way:
'No vehicle is to cross the transverse line ... so as to be likely to endanger any person, or to cause the driver of another vehicle to change its speed or course in order to avoid an accident.'
* There are roundabouts where the traffic in the roundabout has to give way to traffic entering. E.g. the A24 northbound has priority at the B2209 roundabout.
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Colin Bignell

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wrote:

This ^^^^^
Give Way doesn't mean Stop. It doesn't matter if it's a roundabout or a clear stretch of road. If you can go without impeding the other vehicle then you do so. Overhesitation is (used to be) a negative on the driving test.
If it is a two lane roundabout and the other car is on the inside lane then it can still be clear to go.
If two cars approach a roundabout on adjacent entry points at the same time and approximately the same speed then both can safely enter the roundabout at the same time. That's the beauty of roundabouts. Unfortunately some roundabouts are "uneven" so if the traffic from right is approaching at National Speed limit and you're on a 30mph you are unlikely to be able to proceed without impeding the other car.
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On Tue, 14 Jan 2020 10:40:44 GMT, snipped-for-privacy@please.invalid (AnthonyL) wrote:

I'm not sure I agree with that. If the other vehicle changes lane (to exit) and you collide with it, I think you would have a difficult task persuading anyone the accident was other than the result of fault or negligence on your part. I would certainly argue if I were on the roundabout and another vehicle entered the roundabout and collided with me, that liability was prima facie with the other vehicle. A decent dashcam I think would assist such argument.
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On 14/01/2020 10:40, AnthonyL wrote:

The DfT guidelines are that a roundabout should normally carry the lowest speed limit of any of the roads meeting at it.
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