Replace lock barrels with thumbscrews?

I'd prefer thumbscrews on the inside of my patio doors. Mainly because you can't use a key on the outside if there is still a key on the inside.
Is it possible to fit thumbscrews to the existing, or do I need to replace the barrel?
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On 11/08/2013 22:44, R D S wrote:

Do you mean patio? Or dungeon?
--
Rod

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On 11/08/2013 22:44, R D S wrote:

I assume you are talking about standard eurolocks, in which case I think you will need to replace the barrel (not expensive or difficult).
The police will say *never* have thumbscrews, the fire brigade say *always* have them.
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On Sunday 11 August 2013 22:56 newshound wrote in uk.d-i-y:

I have opted for thumbscrews on a new rear door and again in the conservatory to which that door leads.
Reasoning:
1) We can escape in a fire (esp kids whose bedromms are next to that door);
2) OK - someone might reach in a window with a tool and operate the conservatory thumbscrew - but will will have nothing of much value there;
3) There are no windows within reach of the rear door. To operate the thumbscrew would require breaking a full door size DG glass unit. In which case, they could walk through the hole!
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On 11/08/2013 23:04, Tim Watts wrote:

Its not that simple..
thumb turns provide a quick and easy escape route for a burglar. This encourages them to find a way in, not necessaraly via the door. It also makes getting the loot out easier than passing 42" TVs through windows.
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On Monday 12 August 2013 07:53 dennis@home wrote in uk.d-i-y:

It's simple to me - fire escape trumps burglary.
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On Monday 12 August 2013 07:53 dennis@home wrote in uk.d-i-y:

+1.
Mike
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On 11/08/2013 23:04, Tim Watts wrote:

I find it quite amazing, that when I knock on a customers door, how many of them start ferreting about for keys, sometimes a couple of minutes.
People have no idea just how fast a room can become full of smoke.
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On Sun, 11 Aug 2013 22:56:43 +0100, newshound

The crime prevention officer will soon change his mind if you can't find the key when he's about to leave.
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Graham.

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On 11/08/2013 22:56, newshound wrote:

You can get thumb turns which have a push and click piston to add extra security.
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Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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On 2013-08-11, newshound wrote:

In some places outside the UK, it's illegal to have locks on rented accommodation that can't be opened from the inside without a key (for fire safety).
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On Sunday, August 11, 2013 10:44:33 PM UTC+1, R D S wrote:

I think you all mean thumb*turns*.
If it's a Euro cylinder then they can be obtained easily with key one side and thumbturn the other. Eg http://www.screwfix.com/p/securefast-6-pin-thumbturn-euro-cylinder-lock-35-35-70mm-polished-nickel/99334?_requestid23746 (Screwfix item code 99334 if the link doesn't work).
Owain
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On 11/08/2013 22:44, R D S wrote:

You can obtain replacement Euro cylinders with keys inside and out where inserting a key from one side works even if there is a key in the other side - "clutch cam" seems to find them. There is also another version which only works that way from one side, so you have to install them the right way round
SteveW
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On 12/08/2013 00:18, SteveW wrote:

Check your house insurance many have small print that the key must be more than 3 feet from a window at night, having a device that can open the door may invalidate your insurance.
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Would that be 3ft from a window that opens? Or does a fixed pane of glass qualify. If it's openable windows, would that sort of insurance also require that window locks were fitted *and active* ?
If the objective is to stop a burglar exiting with booty, then it's no good if the key is 3ft 1 inch away and findable from the inside.
--
Roland Perry

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On 12/08/2013 09:22, Roland Perry wrote:

I believe its to do with smashing a window and reaching in for the keys to gain access.
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On 12/08/2013 13:21, ss wrote:

I've got a wife and three young children. The key stays in the lock at night, so we can get out in case of a fire - I've been in a house fire once and I'm not taking chances.
Anyway if it's to do with smashing a window to get the keys to gain entry, why should it matter? You must be in if the keys are there!
SteveW
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On Mon, 12 Aug 2013 22:48:27 +0100, SteveW wrote:

I never felt comfortable leaving the key in the lock. You need to be careful to ensure you don't engage it slightly which prevents anyone from opening the door from the outside. I always worried in case my wife had a fall when I was out, and a keyholder couldn't get in.
I'm curious as to how the entire population appears to have been happy to completely change the way front doors lock without a murmur. ISTM we have lost an essential part of the way Yale locks worked, which was to allow a front door to be closed *and* locked without needing a key.
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Is the inability to have keys fully inserted on both sides a bug or a feature?

Not everyone is quite so happy. I would be extremely unhappy to buy a house that didn't have a "Yale" type lock on the front door. The "plastic conservatory" type doors which seem to go with Euro-cyclinder locks are much more prone to going wrong, as well as looking hideous.

The only advantage is that it's virtually impossible to lock yourself out. On the other hand, if you have visitors/guests staying with you, they can't leave and lock the door behind them unless issued with a key.
--
Roland Perry

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On 13/08/2013 10:03, Roland Perry wrote: .

Many uPVC doors with Euro cylinder locks can & do lock you out.
--
Dave - The Medway Handyman www.medwayhandyman.co.uk

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