Qualcast Suffolk Punch 35s - ignition spark problem

Hi
My first post. Hope this is the correct section to post this question.
I've recently gotten hold of a old suffolk punch petrol lawnmower. Was running ok and was looking forward to using in on my lawn.
Pulled it out of the shed at the weekend and thought i'd give it a good clean for the season. I decided the best thing to do would be to spray the engine, in fact the entire mower, in enginer degreaser, leave it running for a while then pressure wash it. On reflection probably not the best idea. The old saying goes "if it's not broken, dont mend it!"
Not long after i'd started pressure washing, the mower cut out and now has about as much life in it as a dodo!! There is just no spark at the plug.
I had assumed that water must have gotten into the ignition system and hoped that if i left it for a few days it would dry out and everything would be fine and dandy. But no! Three days later and still nothing.
Can anyone help? Do you think i have broken anything or do you think it is still simply damp and needs more time to dry out? Is there anything i can do to try and solve the problem or help dry it out? I have read about megneto coil but not sure what this is?
Any help much appreciated!!
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thanks for the response. Nah, nothing as serious as that. engine turns ok and compression is good. There is just no spark at the plug.
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I'd start at plug and work back. Use one from car and see if plug is ok (Unless you have diesel). Has the lead been damaged/dislodged? If you start getting into the main gubbings of the engine, personally I'd bin it. You can get a 4 stroke for 99 nowdays. I got a large self propelled with Briggs and Stratton engine and clutch online for 119. (Can't remember the site off hand)...Bargain.
Can I ask the knowledgable folk here - why dont you get a diesel lawnmower?
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Thanks again for you response. I can see logic in starting at plug. But dont think it is plug as i didn't pressure was top of engine or anywhere near the plug. I can't see the entire lead as is goes through a hole into the casing and not quite worked out how to get to it yet. Yeah could replace it but its a bit of a challenge now and i want to get it running again. I bit of a project i guess!!
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On Tue, 10 Mar 2009 16:41:48 -0700 (PDT), snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I like that attitude.
Wet has got in (pressure washing engines is not a good idea, water gets in...) you need to strip it down as much as you can and dry everything. The ignition module is probably a sealed unit take it off, dry it and put in the airing cupboard for a few days.
Are you sure you have no spark not a carb or fuel tank full of water? Water sinks under fuel amd fuel is picked up from the bottom of the tank.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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Yeah deffo no spark. didn't pressure was anywhere near the fuel tank.
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Too much compression to be able to start with a hand pull ? Need for a glow plug to preheat the fuel mixture to stand any chance of getting it going ? Need for a high pressure fuel injector pump ? Low compression petrol engine with simple carb and magneto-fired spark plug, is simpler all round, requiring no external power source, and no fuel pump. Easily got going with a simple hand-pull recoil starter.
Arfa
Arfa
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On Wed, 11 Mar 2009 02:03:17 -0000, Arfa Daily wrote:

You have a decompression lever to release the compression. You pull several times to spin the engine up on the fly wheel the release the lever. There is enough momentum to take it through compression and provided the engine is in reasonable condition it will fire.

Not on my small single cylinder diesel gen set. From cold it's as rough as old boots for 10 seconds or so producing clouds of white smoke from unburnt fuel but soon picks up and runs up to speed.

Driven off the camshaft not a problem.

Petrol might be a bit simpler but a diesel doesn't need external power and a 4 stroke petrol as in lawnmower does have a fuel pump to lift the fuel from the tank, built into the tank/carb unit on my B&S.
--
Cheers
Dave.




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Dave Liquorice wrote:

Never had a lawnmower with a lift pump before. All mine have had the tank above the engine. A lot simpler!
I think the main reason for the absence of diesel lawnmowers is weight & cost. A small diesel engine with the same power output would weight considerably more.
Tim
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I don't doubt that small diesels are out there on things like generator sets, but they are not particularly suited to use on a lawnmower, for the reasons that I suggested. Key to getting one to start, is the heavy flywheel and valve lifter, neither of which are particularly conducive to the thing being able to be started and pushed, in the case of a non self-propelled type, for someone of a smaller stature, such as the wife ... ;-)
Also, in good condition or not, I'm willing to bet that the thing can still be a bitch to start on a cold day. Witness what little diesels like the Peugeot noddy cars are like when the glowplugs have failed, even with the help of an electric starter - it used to take the lad across the road fully five minutes of almost continuous cranking to get his going, before he got it fixed.
For a standard Qualcast type application, the low revving power of a diesel is not what is ideally required. Easy-start high revs is what is required.
As far as the high pressure fuel pump being driven off the camshaft, that is not really the issue. It still needs input power, as it doesn't get the power to operate for free from the camshaft, so that is additional starting energy that has to be provided by your arm.
Over the years, I have had several cylinder and horizontal rotary petrol mowers, in both self propelled and push variations, and they have all been gravity fed for fuel, with the tank being mounted either up on the handlebar assembll or, in the case of the rotary that I currently have, directly on top of the engine, so no fuel pump of any description being required.
Arfa
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Thanks for the responses guys Agreed, i'll not be pressure washing again. It is clean though!! Will try and access the electrinic ignition module and get it dried out. Problem is that it is located behind the flywheel. Not sure how to remove that. Difficult to remove the nut in the middle as the whole thing simply spins around. Any tips? Ta
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On Tuesday, 10 March 2009 23:19:38 UTC, snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

Ihavethesameproblemwithmyatco14comodorewiththesuffolkengineIcametotheconclusiontheelectronicignitionhadfailedtheflywheelhasalefthandthreadiboughtanewstatorandfitteditstillnospark
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1) The posting you are replying to is 8 years old.
2) Your space key is broken.
--
Today is Sweetmorn, the 20th day of Confusion in the YOLD 3183
I don't have an attitude problem.
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snipped-for-privacy@peters-eaters.co.uk wrote:

LipSmackingThirstQuenchingAceTastingSuffolkPunch?
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On Thu, 15 Jun 2017 09:44:13 -0700, peter wrote:

You've also got a problem with your space bar! and your eyes since you can't read dates!
--
TOJ.

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Blimey, his spacebarhasstoppedworkingagain
Brian
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This newsgroup posting comes to you directly from...
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Rip off all the covers and look at the generation side of the system. Odds are there is a dead short there somewhere
http://www.fixed4free.com/answers.php?id 87
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snipped-for-privacy@hotmail.com wrote:

I think this is likeliest. Water and HT electrics (particularly on old machines) don't mix well. I've heard of people using a low oven to really dry out magnetos.
Possibly a bit extreme but if you can expose the magneto and get some warm dry air into it, it can't do any harm.
Tim
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Yes.
Clean the make and break contacts with a bit of fine emery cloth.
Then waft warm air around the ignition coil. Don't overcook it:-)
regards
--
Tim Lamb

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