How do I fit an old-style spark plug connector on Suffolk Punch?

The existing connector is broken. I can get a new one from e.g. eBay, for example: http://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/Suppressor-Spark-Plug-Cap-Cover-Fits-Suffolk-Qualcast-Lawnmower-/311778038361
This type has a screwed thread inside and presumably I just trim the end of the coil lead, then screw in the new connector?
Anything I should be aware of when doing this?
Thanks.
MM
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Only possibly to only trim the minimum if the existing lead is short as the leads are often part of the coil and so can be lengthened without a joining piece.
I'm assuming you want to go with this old skool cap because of how you kill the engine (metal flap that shorts directly to the plug top)?
Cheers, T i m
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Thanks. Yes, I did wonder about the length of the lead and whether the lead can be extended with some kind of connector piece and some spare cable lead. I think there is actually ample cable lead anyway as the lead is quite "floppy", going towards the plug.
Re the shorting flap, this machine doesn't have one. To stop the mower I just push the control on the handle all the way down. I am not particularly bothered about the type of plug connector, except to say that this "old skool" type is simple and straightforward, whereas the rubber boot caps seem to have to be crimped on, and several YouTube vids I've watched don't make it look easy. Certainly not as easy as just screwing the old style into the lead.
Also, this old connector type does have a suppressor, so I don't know what I'd be gaining by using the modern type.
MM
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On 09/03/2017 10:04, MM wrote:

When I saw the headline "Suffolk Punch" I was tempted to reply "Stick it up its *ss", but refrained! ;-)
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Since typing that earlier I have read elsewhere that these mowers not fitted with the shorting tag were shorted in order to stop them by pushing the throttle lever all the way down, and this action caused the short and the engine stopped. Maybe my problem is with the throttle cable, namely that it is not "un-shorting" the coil when I open the throttle. I just tried again with the spark plug out and the throttle lever opened fully, but there is still no spark.
I also tried another suggestion, namely to straighten a wire paperclip, wrap one end round the spark plug terminal and push the other, straight end into the end of the HT lead. Still no spark.
It looks like I'm going to have to remove the flywheel and check the points. Perhaps the coil has got damp after 5 months in the garage.
MM
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<snip> >>I'm assuming you want to go with this old skool cap because of how you

Gdgd.

Personally and to save having an armful of accidental HT, I'd just go for one of the twist on plastic caps in any case. Or you can get the metal shielded ones (also screw on) if you want something a bit tougher / quieter (depending of anyone is listening to the radio nearby). ;-)

As above ... you only need to touch it once when it's running to appreciate why enclosed caps are better (if you don't have the shorting-plate thing). ;-)
Cheers, T i m
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That ancient type is only suitable for stranded copper core spark plug leads. Most these days will be a conductive plastic core - which has some resistance and designed to cut down the RFI from the spark.
With that type, you bare the core and fold it over the outer insulation, and crimp on the terminal.
--
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On Thu, 09 Mar 2017 10:58:54 +0000 (GMT), "Dave Plowman (News)"

The machine is probably 30 years old at least, so I doubt it's fitted with all mod cons. Besides the connector in the link above *does* have a suppressor.
MM
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Ah - right. You can still buy the old copper cored spark plug cable from the likes of Vehicle Wiring Products.
However, resistive cored cable has been around for more than 30 years. Although originally impregnated string.
--
*Time is the best teacher; unfortunately it kills all its students.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Thursday, 9 March 2017 12:13:27 UTC, MM wrote:

Ah, I thought you meant a pre-war mower which just had a metal ring on the end of the lead, no plastic AFAICR.
If you need spark leads, old aerial wire without the outer copper works fine.
NT
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On 10/03/17 02:08, snipped-for-privacy@gmail.com wrote:

http://www.gsparkplug.com/8mm-ht-ignition-lead-cable-high-resistance-hypalon-black.html
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Best to test it before use. Attach it to the HT lead. Hold it in your hand. Spin the engine.
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May be worth searching for, say, Morris Minor HT leads or similar, if you prefer the older type. Possibly one for a vintage motorcycle. Matchless or AJS or similar.
--
Graeme

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