Plasterboard fixings- The good, the bad and the useless!

Found the following vid of interest,
Plasterboard fixings- The good, the bad and the useless!
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mIEY3E4fiDk

Great title.
"The video includes- plasplugs hollow wall anchors, Plasplugs heavy duty plasterboard hollow wall anchor, Universal wall plug, Worm screw, redi driver, Rosette plasterboard fixing, Snap toggle, Hollow wall anchors, Grip it fixing."
--
Adrian C

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On 07/12/2016 11:01, Adrian Caspersz wrote:

Interesting. Doesn't include the legend that is the Rawlplug UNO.
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Dave - The Medway Handyman

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On Wednesday, 7 December 2016 19:54:40 UTC, David Lang wrote:

Would be more useful if it covered more types and showed what weight each could support, but not a bad start.
NT
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Unfortunately some fittings require a screw to be screwed into the wall and the item slides over it on a keyhole plate. Many of the plugs need the screw to be tight. What is the solution?
I also believe that the modern screws are not as good as the old woodscrews. They had more of a tapered thread root which would act as a wedge and open up a plug. Newer screws tend to merely cut a thread into the lug and they are parallel.
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On 08/12/2016 10:15, DerbyBorn wrote:

Hollow wall anchors are ideal for this. http://www.toolstation.com/shop/p36548

My experience is the opposite of this.

The problem is that if the plug gets pulled back out by the slightest amount the wedge shape results in it becoming *very* slack. Also the greatest amount of expansion is at the start of the hole, often in plaster which is likely to crumble and loose grip. The tip of the plug expands much less near the bottom of the hole where the substrate, will be much stronger and provide a much better grip if there was more expansion.

Decent plugs will expand if you use the correct size screw.
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Mike Clarke

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Yes. Because plasterboard crumbles, the best fixing will spread the load over the back of it. A normal wall plug which simply expands can also split the board if close to an edge or hole.
But with some of these anchors, you may need to change the screw to countersunk.
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*Procrastination is the art of keeping up with yesterday.

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On Wed, 7 Dec 2016 11:01:13 +0000, Adrian Caspersz

and of course if the wall is plasterboard dot&dab onto a solid base (brick or block) then a few of the fixings won't work at all. Obvious to most of us maybe, but not to everyone.
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On Thursday, December 8, 2016 at 3:59:09 PM UTC, Davidm wrote:

I remember coming home cold from the sea many winters ago, and half leaning against the wall, half sitting on the storage heater in a rented house. Wh en I defrosted I went to stand up, the heater fell off the wall. Wrestling with 70kg of bricks is something I do not want to repeat. When I re-attache d the heater, the screws went into the studs, where the should have been in the first place.
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