OT: Strange computer monitor problem

SWMBO's desktop computer uses a Samsung 17" flat screen monitor which is powered via a smart switch (extension lead where the sockets only turn on when the master socket is drawing power).
She's been complaining of late that when she turns her computer on each morning, although the innards are "worbling" (her term!) away, nothing appears on the monitor for a long time.
My first thoughts were that the smart switch was duff - but no. I checked this morning, and other things connected to it - speakers, etc. - were on, and the monitor supply lead was definitely live. But the monitor's power light wasn't on, and the screen was blank.
*Then*, probably 10 minutes later, the thing sprang into life. This has apparently been happening every day for a while.
Anyone ever come across anything like this. I can only assume that some component or other in the (internal) power supply is on the blink and needs to "warm up" for a long time before it does anything. Any ideas?
--
Cheers,
Roger
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What happens if the monitor's just plugged into a normal power lead and switched on? Does it come on immediately-ish or 10min later?
I idly wonder what the standby current of the monitor is, anyway...?
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On 09/01/2016 15:25, Adrian wrote:

I did try a different power lead connected directly into a wall socket this morning. The monitor certainly didn't come on immediately, but I didn't wait 10 minutes - I plugged its normal lead back in after checking that it was supplying 240 volts. I then went and had breakfast, and when I came back the monitor was on!

Probably not that much. Keeping it powered all the time *may* be an option.
--
Cheers,
Roger
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Roger Mills laid this down on his screen :

It sounds as if the switch mode power supply of the monitor is failing to fire up, probably a failing capacitor in the power supply.
--
Regards,
Harry (M1BYT) (L)
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On 10/01/2016 12:06, Harry Bloomfield wrote:

Indeed. I left the monitor on standby last night - connected to a wall socket rather than the smart switch, so that its power didn't go off when the computer shut down. [In this state, with power on but no video signal, the green power light flashes rather than being solid.]
This morning, when we turned the computer on, the monitor came to life immediately. So the monitor's power supply's cold start arrangement has to be prime suspect.
We'll probably live with it until it dies completely. It doesn't owe us a lot - it's over 14 years old. I don't really fancy trying to mend it myself, and the cost of paying someone to fix it would probably approach the cost of a new one.
[I found out its age by checking my financial system for evidence of the purchase, and was horrified to find that back in 2001 it cost us nearly 600 quid for a 17" 4:3 monitor! By comparison, I have recently bought a 24" widescreen monitor for only just over £100.]
--
Cheers,
Roger
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A flashing light or colour change is what I'd expect with no signal.

Or your 'posh' dizzy board ain't supplying the full 240v or whatever. It will likely have a solid state 'switch' somewhere, and they ain't loss less.
--
*CAN AN ATHEIST GET INSURANCE AGAINST ACTS OF GOD?

Dave Plowman snipped-for-privacy@davenoise.co.uk London SW
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On 10/01/2016 15:17, Dave Plowman (News) wrote:

No, if it had been that, it would have worked when I first connected it to a wall socket rather than the smart switch yesterday. It didn't! I used two separate power leads (one at a time!) one connected to the smart switch and the other to a wall socket. I measured the voltage of both with my digital multi-meter - and they both the same (~238v IIRC).
--
Cheers,
Roger
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wrote:
<snip> >I don't really fancy trying to mend it

OOI, have you ever done any PCB type soldering? Would you *like* to carry on using it by fixing it yourself? (If you could wave a magic wand etc (and this is a diy n/g after all))? ;-)

Depending on who that 'person' was of course?
See, there are people out there that actually have such skills that mean that sort of job is really bread_and_butter to them and given the right caps 'in stock' I'm sure that there are some here who would do the job in a few minutes and for a cuppa. ;-)
I've done quite a few now, TV's and monitors and not including those with external PSUs.
Typical process. Half a dozen screws and possibly some clips round the outside (popped open by a strong thumbnail) and the back comes off. Often the PSU is a small stand-alone module and it would be fairly easy to spot if the caps by the bulging or even split ends.
Then it's 'just' (easy for me to say I know, with my 40+ years experience as a electronics / field support 'tech' and desoldering station) a matter of getting under the board , desoldering the caps (often one_at_a_time to avoid confusion, marking the new ones as you go) and soldering the new ones in.
Re-assembly is the reverse of disassembly, as it says in the Haynes manuals.
It probably took me longer to type than it would take to do. ;-)
And assuming that is the problem, it should be good for a good few years.
So, lets say it works and you have just saved say 60+ quid on a new one. Now you have done the one, you might / should also be able to do the next and so on, potentially saving 'lots'.
Not suggesting *you* should, just suggesting it can be easy, moneysaving and satisfying and in many cases you have little to lose.
(You do need to be careful and YMMV of course).
Cheers, T i m
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On 10/01/2016 15:55, T i m wrote:

Thanks for the encouragement. I *might* have a go when I run out of better things to do. Meanwhile, I've replaced it with a 19" 4:3 monitor which I "retired" when I bought a wide-screen monitor for my computer. It's actually newer than the problem one, and slightly larger and - in my opinion - has a much better picture. I'm hoping that SWMBO will agree when she sees it!
--
Cheers,
Roger
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On 10/01/16 14:34, Roger Mills wrote:

That used to be my thinking till I compared actual power consumption and realised a new PC or monitor would pay for itself in less than 2 years down to better standby and operating power
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If you tell a lie big enough and keep repeating it, people will
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an Elonex 386 a long time ago, and the price for each improved replacement has only ever gone down.
--
Graeme

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On Mon, 11 Jan 2016 08:12:36 +0000, News wrote:

Is that all?
I remember, as a student in the very late '80s, pricing up a PC - an Elonex 386SX - to no great spec, even at the time... Not going to happen under a grand and a half.
The utter jaw-dropping value a year or so later of an HP Deskjet (Colour? Don't be daft!) suddenly being under £500...
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Indeed. It was a 'private sale' new, unused PC, hence the price, which had to be cash. Perhaps I should have asked more questions but given that I was in no position to buy a brand new PC from a shop, didn't.
Needless to say it is still in the loft, complete with original boxes, manuals etc.
--
Graeme

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On Mon, 11 Jan 2016 09:02:29 +0000 (UTC), Adrian

I think I paid (only) £360 for my HPDJ500c when the RRP was also around £500. Handy knowing someone who worked at HP. ;-)
Now a cheapo inkjet printer is often cheaper than it's replacement cartridges.
I found the receipts for my first VGA card, Adaptec (ISA) SCSI controller and 80Mb SCSI hard drive the other day <gulp>.
Cheers, T i m
p.s. Is it 'sad' when you know (or knew) what bus (8/16b ISA, ISA/LB EISA, MCA or PCI etc) is used on an Adaptec controller from it's number?
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On 11/01/2016 09:40, T i m wrote:

First Adaptecs I used were SCSI. It might even have been SASI.
Andy
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On 11/01/16 09:02, Adrian wrote:

Oh I got a V70 (?) clone with an orange monitor for around £600 IIRC and a hard drive too. Must have been around 1985

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The first PCs were priced at about £4k because that was the all-in cost of the alternative which was a terminal on a mainframe.
--
bert

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I;ve recently had a similar problem (Viewsonic monitor) and came tot eh same conclusion. Bought a replacement.
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bert

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wrote:

The power saving socket is probebly a red hearing, you need to plug the monitor directly into the mains so there is no doubt.
Assuming it is the monitor itself that is faulty, then yes, it's a very common scenario with switch mode power supplies, typically caused by the failure of a small startup electrolytic capacitor with a value of about 10uF. Also replace any electrolytics with bulging tops.
--

Graham.

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On 09/01/2016 16:18, Graham. wrote:

+1 Especially given it's a Samsung. Might be worth doing a search using the model number on Badcaps or just Google it with the model number plus "bad caps" :)
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